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Issue Details: First known date: 1956... 1956 Laughter, Not for a Cage : Notes on Australian Writing, with Biographical Emphasis on the Struggles, Functions and Achievements of the Novel in Three-Half Centuries
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Contents

* Contents derived from the Sydney, New South Wales,:Angus and Robertson , 1956 version. Please note that other versions/publications may contain different contents. See the Publication Details.
Invasion of Aboriginal Australia. The Convict Brand., Miles Franklin , 1956 single work criticism (p. 1-15)
The Forerunners : Henry Savery, Major William Christie, Charles Rowcroft, Mrs Francis Vidal, Alexander Harris, W. C. Wentworth, Miles Franklin , 1956 single work criticism (p. 16-27)
First Novel by a Native Born : Gertrude the Emigrant. First Four Novels of Adequate Tonnage., Miles Franklin , 1956 single work criticism (p. 28-68)
The Anglo-Australians: Mrs Campbell Praed, Ada Cambridge, Tasma, Catherine Edith Martin; also Simpson Newland, Fergus Hume, and Nat Gould., Miles Franklin , 1956 single work criticism
The backgrounds of the writers and the times in which they lived; the development of an Australian identity, and current political movements.
(p. 69-95)
The Nineties and The Bulletin. Vigorous Self-assertion in Politics and Writings. Short Stories and Ballads Run Ahead of the Novel. Minor Novels. Steele Rudd., Miles Franklin , 1956 single work criticism (p. 96-117)
The New Century. The Established Trend. My Brilliant Career. Such is Life. Human Toll. Jonah. Mr Moffat. Norman Lindsay. Other Novels., Miles Franklin , 1956 single work criticism (p. 118-138)
Relapse into Old Ruts. Anzac - the Australians' Baptism of Blood - Writings by Anzacs. The Australian Novel goes into Recess. The Interim with "The Fortunes of Richard Mahony", "The Escape of the Notorious Sir William Heans". A Miscellany: Paul Wenz writing in French, D. H. Lawrence, Havelock Ellis., Miles Franklin , 1956 single work criticism (p. 139-166)
Reappearance of the Australian Novel in Force. The "Bulletin's" First Literary Competition. "Flesh in Armour" and "Her Privates We", "Seven Poor Men of Sydney". Work in Progress by Brent of Bin Bin, Brian Penton, John K. Ewers, Jean Devanny and Others. Some Expatriates - "The Montforts" and "Lucinda Brayford", "Pageant"., Miles Franklin , 1956 single work criticism (p. 167-186)
Brent of Bin Bin, Arthur Ashworth , 1951 single work criticism (p. 180-182)
Aborigines as a Theme : Desert Saga, Coonardoo, Capricornia, The Timeless Land, Others., Miles Franklin , 1956 single work criticism (p. 187-200)
Novels by Younger Writers. Avoidance of the Present Tense. Kylie Tennant. Margaret Trist. H. Drake-Brockman., Miles Franklin , 1956 single work criticism (p. 201-210)
Where does the Australian Novel Stand Today? Not yet Regional. Criticism. Old Australia: New Australians. Whither now? Swan Song or Advance the Commonwealth?, Miles Franklin , 1956 single work criticism (p. 211-230)

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Notes:
Notes expanded from 10 talks, 8 of which were delivered as Commonwealth Literary Fund lectures at The University of Western Australia in 1950

Works about this Work

'Our Literary Connexion' : Rosa Praed and George Bentley Chris Tiffin , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Literary Studies , October-November vol. 27 no. 3/4 2012; (p. 107-123)

This essay examines Rosa Praed's communication 'through letters, agreements, publisher's ledgers, and memoirs of her dealings with one of her early publishers, George Bentley of Richard Bentley & Son. These dealings were essentially professional and financial, but they were also educative and personal. George Bentley was one of several male mentors during Praed's first decade of publishing, but the only one who was both mentor and publisher....' (108)

Stella vs Miles : Women Writers and Literary Value in Australia Julieanne Lamond , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Meanjin , Spring vol. 70 no. 3 2011; (p. 32-39)

'Stella Miles Franklin did not want readers of her novel My Brilliant Career to assume that its author was a woman. She wrote to its publishers, asking for the 'Miss' to be removed: she intended readers to believe it to be written by 'a bald-headed seer of the sterner sex'. When Henry Lawson first read it he was flummoxed by the gender of the author. He wrote to Franklin, asking her: 'Will you write and tell me what your really are? Man or woman?' This confusion is nowhere apparent in the preface he wrote for the novel's publication in 1901...' (Introduction, p 32)

Australian Fiction and the World Republic of Letters, 1890-1950 Robert Dixon , 2009 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Cambridge History of Australian Literature 2009; (p. 223-254)
Discusses the changes in Australian fiction from the late-nineteenth to the mid-twentieth century, including international influences and the role of overseas publishers and global trends.
'Laughter, Not for a Cage': Miles Franklin and the Writing of Australian Literary History Jill Roe , 1996 single work criticism biography
— Appears in: 'And What Books Do You Read?' : New Studies in Australian Literature 1996; (p. 51-62)
Catherine Martin and the Critics John V. Byrnes , 1961 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Letters , June vol. 3 no. 4 1961; (p. 15-24)
Byrnes defends Martin's An Australian Girl against the criticism of Miller & Macartney, Colin Roderick and Miles Franklin, noting the quality of her writing, her use of Australian themes and her recognition of the significance of religion in the lives of her characters.
Untitled T. Inglis Moore , 1956 single work review
— Appears in: Meanjin , Summer vol. 15 no. 4 1956; (p. 426-427)

— Review of Laughter, Not for a Cage : Notes on Australian Writing, with Biographical Emphasis on the Struggles, Functions and Achievements of the Novel in Three-Half Centuries Miles Franklin , 1956 selected work criticism essay
Welcome Nugget Marjorie Pizer , 1956 single work review
— Appears in: Overland , Spring no. 8 1956; (p. 34-35)

— Review of Laughter, Not for a Cage : Notes on Australian Writing, with Biographical Emphasis on the Struggles, Functions and Achievements of the Novel in Three-Half Centuries Miles Franklin , 1956 selected work criticism essay
Miles Franklin Speaks Out 1956 single work review
— Appears in: The Bulletin , 16 May vol. 77 no. 3979 1956; (p. 2)

— Review of Laughter, Not for a Cage : Notes on Australian Writing, with Biographical Emphasis on the Struggles, Functions and Achievements of the Novel in Three-Half Centuries Miles Franklin , 1956 selected work criticism essay
Australian Fiction and the World Republic of Letters, 1890-1950 Robert Dixon , 2009 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Cambridge History of Australian Literature 2009; (p. 223-254)
Discusses the changes in Australian fiction from the late-nineteenth to the mid-twentieth century, including international influences and the role of overseas publishers and global trends.
Stella vs Miles : Women Writers and Literary Value in Australia Julieanne Lamond , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Meanjin , Spring vol. 70 no. 3 2011; (p. 32-39)

'Stella Miles Franklin did not want readers of her novel My Brilliant Career to assume that its author was a woman. She wrote to its publishers, asking for the 'Miss' to be removed: she intended readers to believe it to be written by 'a bald-headed seer of the sterner sex'. When Henry Lawson first read it he was flummoxed by the gender of the author. He wrote to Franklin, asking her: 'Will you write and tell me what your really are? Man or woman?' This confusion is nowhere apparent in the preface he wrote for the novel's publication in 1901...' (Introduction, p 32)

'Laughter, Not for a Cage': Miles Franklin and the Writing of Australian Literary History Jill Roe , 1996 single work criticism biography
— Appears in: 'And What Books Do You Read?' : New Studies in Australian Literature 1996; (p. 51-62)
Catherine Martin and the Critics John V. Byrnes , 1961 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Letters , June vol. 3 no. 4 1961; (p. 15-24)
Byrnes defends Martin's An Australian Girl against the criticism of Miller & Macartney, Colin Roderick and Miles Franklin, noting the quality of her writing, her use of Australian themes and her recognition of the significance of religion in the lives of her characters.
'Our Literary Connexion' : Rosa Praed and George Bentley Chris Tiffin , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Literary Studies , October-November vol. 27 no. 3/4 2012; (p. 107-123)

This essay examines Rosa Praed's communication 'through letters, agreements, publisher's ledgers, and memoirs of her dealings with one of her early publishers, George Bentley of Richard Bentley & Son. These dealings were essentially professional and financial, but they were also educative and personal. George Bentley was one of several male mentors during Praed's first decade of publishing, but the only one who was both mentor and publisher....' (108)

Last amended 16 Sep 2002 15:17:07
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