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The Williad sequence   poetry  
Issue Details: First known date: 2009... 2009 The Williad
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Notes

  • Dedication: This poem is dedicated to all the Important Male Influences, dead or alive, who have been playfully utilised in the writing of this Epic. The title remodels that of Homer's The Iliad; The verse form (blank verse) has been lifted from Virgil's Aeneid (and many other worthy later users, such as Shakespeare and Milton); The idea of putting the title of The Iliad to humorous use is pinched from Alexander Pope and his 'The Dunciad', a satirical epic on (male) dunces; The mock-heroic tone is inspired by 'The Rape of the Lock', a trivial (male) quest described in heroic terms, also by Alexander Pope; The Writer tying herself to the chair to resist the call of Hunger laughs at Homer's story of the irresistible call of the Sirens; and the Strait of Love Lack recalls the story of Scylla and Charyribdis. Both are in The Odyssey; Two lines in the stanza on Hunger ('past reason hated, as a swallowed bait / on purpose laid to make the taker mad') have been lifted from Shakespeare's sonnet 129, a poem on (male) lust. The verses are unchanged; the joke is in the change of context; Sleep, the Knot of Perfect Traps, plays with Sir Philip Sidney's sonnet 'Come Sleep, O Sleep, the perfect knot of peace'; Many ancient and less ancient myths and quest stories are remembered in this poem: The Iliad, The Odyssey, Beowulf, Sinbad the Sailor, Gerusalemme Liberata, Apollonius of Tyre, Pericles, The Lord of the Rings... one of them female; The ending takes liberties with the famous final lines of T.S. Eliot's 'The Hollow Men', a poem on the First World War and the futility of wars.

Includes

The Epic on the Epic, Ecriture Feminine. i "Sing to me of the woman, plaintive Muse,", Danijela Kambaskovic , 2009 single work poetry
— Appears in: Cordite Poetry Review , December no. 31 2009;
The Writer and the Attack of Hunger i "And as she bit her pencil, plotting hard,", Danijela Kambaskovic , 2009 single work poetry
— Appears in: Cordite Poetry Review , December no. 31 2009;
The Writer and the Monsters of Child and Housework i "The first victory hers, the Writer thought", Danijela Kambaskovic , 2009 single work poetry
— Appears in: Cordite Poetry Review , December no. 31 2009; Thirty Australian Poets 2011; (p. 154)
The Writer and the Battle of Bills i "And as the golden sun rose in the sky", Danijela Kambaskovic , 2009 single work poetry
— Appears in: Cordite Poetry Review , December no. 31 2009;
The Writer Conquers Sleep i "It is evening: the Child in bed, the cats", Danijela Kambaskovic , 2009 single work poetry
— Appears in: Cordite Poetry Review , December no. 31 2009;
The Writer and the Strait of Love-Lack i "As she recovered from that trial of strength", Danijela Kambaskovic , 2009 single work poetry
— Appears in: Cordite Poetry Review , December no. 31 2009;
The Writer Emerges Victorious i "Having conquered all her Enemies Five,", Danijela Kambaskovic , 2009 single work poetry
— Appears in: Cordite Poetry Review , December no. 31 2009;

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Last amended 11 Jan 2010 12:31:14
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