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Issue Details: First known date: 2009... 2009 Earth's Breath
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Contents

* Contents derived from the North Melbourne, Flemington - North Melbourne area, Melbourne - North, Melbourne, Victoria,:Spinifex Press , 2009 version. Please note that other versions/publications may contain different contents. See the Publication Details.
Climate Change: Yugantameghahi"At the end of every cosmic cycle,", Susan Hawthorne , 2008 single work poetry Climate Change: Yugantameghaha

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • North Melbourne, Flemington - North Melbourne area, Melbourne - North, Melbourne, Victoria,: Spinifex Press , 2009 .
      Extent: 84p.
      Note/s:
      • Partial contents indexed. Remainder pending.
      ISBN: 9781876756734

Works about this Work

Of Cyclones and Bovines: Living in the Torrid Zone Susan Hawthorne , 2011 single work essay
— Appears in: Etropic : Electronic Journal of Studies in the Tropics , no. 10 2011; (p. 55-62)
Heeding the Warnings : ‘Sucking up the Seas’ in Vance Palmer’s Cyclone Deborah Jordan , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Etropic : Electronic Journal of Studies in the Tropics , no. 10 2011; (p. 20-31)
'Climate change literary criticism calls for fundamental re-evalutions of our critical tools. In representations of extreme weather events, Vance Palmer's Cyclone set in North Queensland meets many of the new criterion with its story about the impact of the cyclone on individuals, community and plot. The genesis and inspiration of the novel, its writing, its publication, review and reception can be addressed. The cyclone is seen through the perceptions of different characters. Vance and Nettie Palmer knew many of the people drowned in the 1934 cyclone. Palmer drew on the historical record in his novel, which was published over a decade later. The reception of Cyclone was very limited given it was published locally by Angus & Robertson and had no serious critical response. The environmental imagination has been a powerful force in Australia creative writing and is undervalued in contemporary debates.' (Author's abstract)
The Interview : Susan Hawthorne Talks with Heather Taylor Johnson Heather Taylor Johnson (interviewer), 2011 single work interview
— Appears in: Wet Ink , no. 25 2011; (p. 30-34)
John Jenkins; of Jordie Albiston, The Sonnet According to “m”; Philip Hammial, Skin Theory; Susan Hawthorn, Earth’s Breath; Felicity Plunkett, Vanishing Point John Jenkins , 2011 single work review
— Appears in: Long Paddock , vol. 70 no. 3 2011;

— Review of Vanishing Point Felicity Plunkett , 2009 selected work poetry ; The Sonnet According to 'M' Jordie Albiston , 2009 selected work poetry ; Skin Theory Philip Hammial , 2009 selected work poetry ; Earth's Breath Susan Hawthorne , 2009 selected work poetry
Autopoiesis and Ecopoetry Susan Hawthorne , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: PAN , no. 7 2010; (p. 94-100)
'Poetry has always been the song that is imprinted in human culture, and equally importantly the song that we learn from the natural world. What can happen to poetry, what might happen to poetry, where are poetry's songs, in a world where nature could be overwhelmed by the over-consumption of resources, and where nature itself might become unrecognisable through the effects of our inventiveness on its integrity. Is ecopoetry a form of elegy or a vision into the future? Or, perhaps even more interestingly, is it a glimpse of an enduring position that humans have had over many thousands of years?' (Author's abstract)
John Jenkins; of Jordie Albiston, The Sonnet According to “m”; Philip Hammial, Skin Theory; Susan Hawthorn, Earth’s Breath; Felicity Plunkett, Vanishing Point John Jenkins , 2011 single work review
— Appears in: Long Paddock , vol. 70 no. 3 2011;

— Review of Vanishing Point Felicity Plunkett , 2009 selected work poetry ; The Sonnet According to 'M' Jordie Albiston , 2009 selected work poetry ; Skin Theory Philip Hammial , 2009 selected work poetry ; Earth's Breath Susan Hawthorne , 2009 selected work poetry
Autopoiesis and Ecopoetry Susan Hawthorne , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: PAN , no. 7 2010; (p. 94-100)
'Poetry has always been the song that is imprinted in human culture, and equally importantly the song that we learn from the natural world. What can happen to poetry, what might happen to poetry, where are poetry's songs, in a world where nature could be overwhelmed by the over-consumption of resources, and where nature itself might become unrecognisable through the effects of our inventiveness on its integrity. Is ecopoetry a form of elegy or a vision into the future? Or, perhaps even more interestingly, is it a glimpse of an enduring position that humans have had over many thousands of years?' (Author's abstract)
The Interview : Susan Hawthorne Talks with Heather Taylor Johnson Heather Taylor Johnson (interviewer), 2011 single work interview
— Appears in: Wet Ink , no. 25 2011; (p. 30-34)
Heeding the Warnings : ‘Sucking up the Seas’ in Vance Palmer’s Cyclone Deborah Jordan , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Etropic : Electronic Journal of Studies in the Tropics , no. 10 2011; (p. 20-31)
'Climate change literary criticism calls for fundamental re-evalutions of our critical tools. In representations of extreme weather events, Vance Palmer's Cyclone set in North Queensland meets many of the new criterion with its story about the impact of the cyclone on individuals, community and plot. The genesis and inspiration of the novel, its writing, its publication, review and reception can be addressed. The cyclone is seen through the perceptions of different characters. Vance and Nettie Palmer knew many of the people drowned in the 1934 cyclone. Palmer drew on the historical record in his novel, which was published over a decade later. The reception of Cyclone was very limited given it was published locally by Angus & Robertson and had no serious critical response. The environmental imagination has been a powerful force in Australia creative writing and is undervalued in contemporary debates.' (Author's abstract)
Of Cyclones and Bovines: Living in the Torrid Zone Susan Hawthorne , 2011 single work essay
— Appears in: Etropic : Electronic Journal of Studies in the Tropics , no. 10 2011; (p. 55-62)
Last amended 11 Oct 2010 12:18:46
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