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Is The Ward Clean? single work   criticism  
Issue Details: First known date: 1982... 1982 Is The Ward Clean?
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'Case study of Jane King, Aboriginal girl sent to Cootamundra Home in 1923 by the Aborigines Welfare Board; describes the effect on her of institutionalization , particularly its obsession with hygiene and a denial of Aboriginality. ' (Source: TROVE)

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Works about this Work

Aboriginal Grandmothers and the Living Memorial of Oral History Kathleen Butler-Mcllwraith , Julianne Butler , 2004 single work criticism
— Appears in: Journal of Interdisciplinary Gender Studies , July vol. 9 no. 1 2004; (p. 4-16)
In the last decade, the issue of the Stolen Generations has been central to much academic debate. In detailing life histories, it is generally acknowledged that these individuals were denied their 'place' in their families. We write from the position of those who were not removed, and had/have positive experiences being nurtured in an Aboriginal family. Our sympathy for the Stolen Generations is two-fold. We are distressed at the ramifications of their racialised oppression, but we are also truly 'sorry' at the denial of opportunities to experience family, an opportunity from which we have so richly benefited. In this paper, we attempt to explain what those benefits entailed for us and thus what may have been for others. -- Authors' abstract
Aboriginal Grandmothers and the Living Memorial of Oral History Kathleen Butler-Mcllwraith , Julianne Butler , 2004 single work criticism
— Appears in: Journal of Interdisciplinary Gender Studies , July vol. 9 no. 1 2004; (p. 4-16)
In the last decade, the issue of the Stolen Generations has been central to much academic debate. In detailing life histories, it is generally acknowledged that these individuals were denied their 'place' in their families. We write from the position of those who were not removed, and had/have positive experiences being nurtured in an Aboriginal family. Our sympathy for the Stolen Generations is two-fold. We are distressed at the ramifications of their racialised oppression, but we are also truly 'sorry' at the denial of opportunities to experience family, an opportunity from which we have so richly benefited. In this paper, we attempt to explain what those benefits entailed for us and thus what may have been for others. -- Authors' abstract
Last amended 12 Aug 2014 15:40:05
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