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y separately published work icon Leaving Home with Henry single work   novel  
Issue Details: First known date: 2009... 2009 Leaving Home with Henry
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'Henry Lawson arises from the vaults of the National Library and hitches a road trip around contemporary Australia. His driver (and erstwhile narrator) Trevor is in search of the 'real' Australia, and they travel together through western New South Wales, on up into Queensland, retracing the past and imagining the present. Henry has a romantic moment in Nimbin, is charmed by the contradictions of Byron Bay, makes it to the Gold Coast, and eventually finishes up in his old home town of Sydney. This novel asks central questions about Australians and the myths they create for themselves. Are we an egalitarian people or individuals in the pursuit of pleasure?' (Publisher's blurb)

Notes

  • Dedication: For Michael

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • Melbourne, Victoria,: Press On , 2009 .
      image of person or book cover 2098989333347053757.jpg
      Extent: 89p.
      ISBN: 9781921509551
      Series: y separately published work icon Press On Arcadia (publisher), Melbourne : Arcadia , 2009 Z1824488 2009 series - publisher novel 'Press On is published in partnership with Arcadia. In 2010, four Press On books were published by Press On Publishing in association with Arcadia, the general books' imprint of Australian Scholarly Publishing. Authors Michael Wilding, Peter Corris, Phillip Edmonds and Inez Baranay began the first batch of Press On. Commissioned by Michael Wilding, eight more books join the series with new authors Morris Lurie, Garry Disher, Ross Fitzgerald, Trevor Jordan and Victoria Thompson. Felix Calvino's previously published A Hatful of Cherries Arcadia, 2009 has also taken on the Press On logo. Arcadia's 2011 Press On additions were launched at the Melbourne Writers Festival this year.' Source: www.scholarly.info/ (Sighted 15/11/2011). Number in series: 3

Works about this Work

Rewriting Australian Literature Nicholas Jose , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Teaching Australian Literature : From Classroom Conversations to National Imaginings 2011; (p. 95-107)
'There are those of us who are trying to rethink the place of Australian literature in our lives, as readers and writers, students and teachers, and as participants in this society and culture. It's happening from different angles: in the academy, in literary studies, cultural studies, and Australian studies, including Australian history, at undergraduate and postgraduate levels, and in research frameworks; in secondary and primary education, locally and nationally; and in the public domain. It's also happening internationally, through translation, and in the many different spaces where Australian literature might have meaning. Meaning, of course, is a first question and the meanings of both 'Australian' and 'literature' are fluid and routinely contested. Coupling the terms only increased the questioning, raising the stakes to beg the question of whether it is meaningful or necessary to talk about Australian literature at all. What is it? Does it exist? Does it matter anymore, or any differently from any other kind of literature, simply because we happen to be in Australia? Does it have a privileged claim on our attention, or, if it does, is that suspect? Each part of the coupling comes with hefty baggage. 'Australian' brings the national, the nation and the nationalistic, identity and belonging, history and culture, citizenship and inclusion/exclusion. 'Literature' brings not only the literary, but also language, and literacy, questions of reading and writing, and teaching and learning in relation to reading and writing. In particular it brings, for my purposes here, those approaches and practices known as 'creative writing' that in recent decades have entered subject English and more broadly the business of how literature is made is made in our society. 'Creative writing' is an infelicitous term, perhaps, but one we're stuck with, understood as something with many manifestations, widespread popularity and its own complex institutional history. Discussion of these things - creative writing and Australian literature in the curricular context - joins with larger debates about our education and contemporary culture that tend, paradoxically, to adopt a rhetoric of embattlement while taking for granted the importance of both related fields. It is surprising that, in a neoliberal, technocratic, metric-managed world, reading, writing and creativity should retain such power and loom so large.' (Author's abstract)
Pressing on with Writer's Cuts Peter Pierce , 2010 single work review
— Appears in: The Canberra Times , 4 December 2010; (p. 22)

— Review of With the Tiger Inez Baranay , 2008 single work novel ; Wishart's Quest Peter Corris , 2009 single work novel ; Leaving Home with Henry Phillip Edmonds , 2009 single work novel ; The Prisoner of Mount Warning Michael Wilding , 2010 single work novel
Untitled Rick Sullivan , 2010 single work review
— Appears in: The Advertiser , 20 November 2010; (p. 25)

— Review of Leaving Home with Henry Phillip Edmonds , 2009 single work novel
Untitled Rick Sullivan , 2010 single work review
— Appears in: The Advertiser , 20 November 2010; (p. 25)

— Review of Leaving Home with Henry Phillip Edmonds , 2009 single work novel
Pressing on with Writer's Cuts Peter Pierce , 2010 single work review
— Appears in: The Canberra Times , 4 December 2010; (p. 22)

— Review of With the Tiger Inez Baranay , 2008 single work novel ; Wishart's Quest Peter Corris , 2009 single work novel ; Leaving Home with Henry Phillip Edmonds , 2009 single work novel ; The Prisoner of Mount Warning Michael Wilding , 2010 single work novel
Rewriting Australian Literature Nicholas Jose , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Teaching Australian Literature : From Classroom Conversations to National Imaginings 2011; (p. 95-107)
'There are those of us who are trying to rethink the place of Australian literature in our lives, as readers and writers, students and teachers, and as participants in this society and culture. It's happening from different angles: in the academy, in literary studies, cultural studies, and Australian studies, including Australian history, at undergraduate and postgraduate levels, and in research frameworks; in secondary and primary education, locally and nationally; and in the public domain. It's also happening internationally, through translation, and in the many different spaces where Australian literature might have meaning. Meaning, of course, is a first question and the meanings of both 'Australian' and 'literature' are fluid and routinely contested. Coupling the terms only increased the questioning, raising the stakes to beg the question of whether it is meaningful or necessary to talk about Australian literature at all. What is it? Does it exist? Does it matter anymore, or any differently from any other kind of literature, simply because we happen to be in Australia? Does it have a privileged claim on our attention, or, if it does, is that suspect? Each part of the coupling comes with hefty baggage. 'Australian' brings the national, the nation and the nationalistic, identity and belonging, history and culture, citizenship and inclusion/exclusion. 'Literature' brings not only the literary, but also language, and literacy, questions of reading and writing, and teaching and learning in relation to reading and writing. In particular it brings, for my purposes here, those approaches and practices known as 'creative writing' that in recent decades have entered subject English and more broadly the business of how literature is made is made in our society. 'Creative writing' is an infelicitous term, perhaps, but one we're stuck with, understood as something with many manifestations, widespread popularity and its own complex institutional history. Discussion of these things - creative writing and Australian literature in the curricular context - joins with larger debates about our education and contemporary culture that tend, paradoxically, to adopt a rhetoric of embattlement while taking for granted the importance of both related fields. It is surprising that, in a neoliberal, technocratic, metric-managed world, reading, writing and creativity should retain such power and loom so large.' (Author's abstract)
Last amended 6 May 2014 15:47:45
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