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Issue Details: First known date: 2008... 2008 Yerrabilela Jimbelung : Poems about Friends and Family
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'Lionel Fogarty is a leading spokesman for Indigenous rights in Australia through a poetry of linguistic uniqueness and overwhelming passion. In resisting the colonising force of English, he has reterritorialised the language of the invaders and made of it a language that speaks for his people. As well as a selection of his recent poems, Lionel introduces works by two young poets, Yvette Walker and his son Kargun Fogarty.' (Source: publishers website)

Exhibitions

9428942

Contents

* Contents derived from the Southport, Southport area, Gold Coast, Queensland,:Keeaira Press , 2008 version. Please note that other versions/publications may contain different contents. See the Publication Details.
Kargun Fogartyi"Working on this book with my father and Yvette is yet another stepping stone in the first revolution.", Kargun Fogarty , single work poetry (p. 8)
Yvette Walkeri"I am determined to give voice to young Indigenous women in Australia", Yvette Walker , single work poetry (p. 9)
True Blue Didgeridooi"White women playing our didgeridoo instrument", Kargun Fogarty , single work poetry (p. 11)
Note: Works by Kargun Fogarty
Fair Skinned Aboi"I may not be charcoal coloured but I'm Black", Kargun Fogarty , single work poetry (p. 12)
Pay the Renti"Coming around the corner I saw a policeman", Kargun Fogarty , single work poetry (p. 13)
A Newspaper Societyi"Only 30 years ago my race of people were suffragettes", Kargun Fogarty , single work poetry (p. 14-15)
Nunukeli"Across the land and sea to Mageerabah way", Kargun Fogarty , single work poetry (p. 16)
Man, Demand Landi"Isn't it funny how all people are suckers for money", Kargun Fogarty , single work poetry (p. 17)
The Forefronti"We are at the forefront of our struggle", Kargun Fogarty , single work poetry (p. 18)
What I Ami"I am not a child I am not a man nor an ocean fish", Kargun Fogarty , single work poetry (p. 19)
Guppoi"Gupi guppo guppula gupipulka bursting from the sky", Kargun Fogarty , single work poetry (p. 20)
TV's Black Leaders Selling Outi"Zonked out with a sore head 'cause watching TV left me brain dead", Kargun Fogarty , single work poetry (p. 21)
Just a Woman Bashing Dogi"You are always telling her you love her", Kargun Fogarty , single work poetry (p. 22)
Note: *For all women and children who are victims of Domestic Violence
Smell the Baconi"Counteract an attack on a brother colored Black", Kargun Fogarty , single work poetry (p. 23)
School's Out NAH!i"Black people need to be educated white man's way", Kargun Fogarty , single work poetry (p. 24)
Steal for a Meali"People do anything, for a dollar or a dime real sneaky mob,", Kargun Fogarty , single work poetry (p. 25)
Mookadook Mani"A wise, intelligent man once spoke how can you hit your women", Kargun Fogarty , single work poetry (p. 26-27)
Brown Mani"Glimmer, glimmer...softness, redness, brown backdrop canvas of man!", Yvette Walker , single work poetry (p. 29)
Advicei"Little daughter barely there, swollen bososms and unstable identity", Yvette Walker , single work poetry (p. 30)
Untitledi"Red ochre satin mixed with the colours of the rainbow", Yvette Walker , single work poetry (p. 31)

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Works about this Work

y separately published work icon Speaking the Earth's Languages : A Theory for Australian-Chilean Postcolonial Poetics Stuart Cooke , New York (City) Amsterdam : Rodopi , 2013 6178076 2013 single work criticism

Speaking the Earth’s Languages brings together for the first time critical discussions of postcolonial poetics from Australia and Chile. The book crosses multiple languages, landscapes, and disciplines, and draws on a wide range of both oral and written poetries, in order to make strong claims about the importance of ‘a nomad poetics’ – not only for understanding Aboriginal or Mapuche writing practices but, more widely, for the problems confronting contemporary literature and politics in colonized landscapes.

The book begins by critiquing canonical examples of non-indigenous postcolonial poetics. Incisive re-readings of two icons of Australian and Chilean poetry, Judith Wright (1915–2000) and Pablo Neruda (1904–1973), provide rich insights into non-indigenous responses to colonization in the wake of modernity. The second half of the book establishes compositional links between Aboriginal and Mapuche poetics, and between such oral and written poetics more generally.

The book’s final part develops an ‘emerging synthesis’ of contemporary Aboriginal and Mapuche poetics, with reference to the work of two of the most important avant-garde Aboriginal and Mapuche poets of recent times, Lionel Fogarty (1958–) and Paulo Huirimilla (1973–).

Speaking the Earth’s Languages uses these fascinating links between Aboriginal and Mapuche poetics as the basis of a deliberately nomadic, open-ended theory for an Australian–Chilean postcolonial poetics. 'The central argument of this book,' the author writes, 'is that a nomadic poetics is essential for a genuinely postcolonial form of habitation, or a habitation of colonized landscapes that doesn’t continue to replicate colonialist ideologies involving indigenous dispossession and environmental exploitation.' [from the publisher's website]

y separately published work icon Speaking the Earth's Languages : A Theory for Australian-Chilean Postcolonial Poetics Stuart Cooke , New York (City) Amsterdam : Rodopi , 2013 6178076 2013 single work criticism

Speaking the Earth’s Languages brings together for the first time critical discussions of postcolonial poetics from Australia and Chile. The book crosses multiple languages, landscapes, and disciplines, and draws on a wide range of both oral and written poetries, in order to make strong claims about the importance of ‘a nomad poetics’ – not only for understanding Aboriginal or Mapuche writing practices but, more widely, for the problems confronting contemporary literature and politics in colonized landscapes.

The book begins by critiquing canonical examples of non-indigenous postcolonial poetics. Incisive re-readings of two icons of Australian and Chilean poetry, Judith Wright (1915–2000) and Pablo Neruda (1904–1973), provide rich insights into non-indigenous responses to colonization in the wake of modernity. The second half of the book establishes compositional links between Aboriginal and Mapuche poetics, and between such oral and written poetics more generally.

The book’s final part develops an ‘emerging synthesis’ of contemporary Aboriginal and Mapuche poetics, with reference to the work of two of the most important avant-garde Aboriginal and Mapuche poets of recent times, Lionel Fogarty (1958–) and Paulo Huirimilla (1973–).

Speaking the Earth’s Languages uses these fascinating links between Aboriginal and Mapuche poetics as the basis of a deliberately nomadic, open-ended theory for an Australian–Chilean postcolonial poetics. 'The central argument of this book,' the author writes, 'is that a nomadic poetics is essential for a genuinely postcolonial form of habitation, or a habitation of colonized landscapes that doesn’t continue to replicate colonialist ideologies involving indigenous dispossession and environmental exploitation.' [from the publisher's website]

Last amended 27 Apr 2017 13:24:18
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