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y separately published work icon Collecting Colour single work   picture book   children's  
Issue Details: First known date: 2008... 2008 Collecting Colour
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'A young girl, Rose, living in the Top End of the Northern Territory, tells the story of a day spent collecting colour from the local plants and making them into beautiful baskets. Collecting Colour, featuring stunning acrylic illustrations on Nepalese paper, is a feast for the senses and is also a fascinating insight into the way of life of fibre artists, who produce beautiful, original work in sometimes difficult conditions.' (Libraries Australia)

Notes

  • This is affiliated with Dr Laurel Cohn's Picture Book Diet because it contains representations of food and/or food practices.

    Food depiction
    • Incidental
    Food types
    • Everyday foods
    • Discretionary foods
    • High sugar foods
    • Processed foods
    • Fresh foods
    • Fast food/Takeaway
    • Bushtucker
    Food practices
    • Eating out - picnics
    • Food shopping
    • Food preparation
    Gender
    • Food shopping - female
    • Food preparation - female [outdoor fire]
    Signage n/a
    Positive/negative value n/a
    Food as sense of place n/a
    Setting n/a
    Food as social cohesion
    • Family meals [picnic lunch, dinner]
    • Social gatherings
    Food as cultural identity
    • Indigenous Australian characters
    Food as character identity n/a
    Food as language n/a

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • Melbourne, Victoria,: Lothian , 2008 .
      image of person or book cover 4899715845829469980.jpg
      This image has been sourced from online.
      Extent: 30p.
      Description: illus.
      ISBN: 9780734411181 (pbk.), 9780734410221 (hbk.)

Other Formats

  • Also sound recording.

Works about this Work

What Are We Feeding Our Children When We Read Them a Book? Depictions of Mothers and Food in Contemporary Australian Picture Books Laurel Cohn , 2016 single work criticism
— Appears in: Mothers and Food : Negotiating Foodways from Maternal Perspectives 2016; (p. 232-244)

'This chapter explores how Australian writers and illustrators in the twenty-first century depict the act of mothering in picture books for young children in relation to cooking and serving food. It draws on the idea that children’s texts can be understood as sites of cultural production and reproduction, with social conventions and ideologies embedded in their narrative representations. The analysis is based on a survey of 124 books that were shortlisted for, or won, Children’s Book Council of Australia awards between 2001 and 2013. Of the eighty-seven titles that contain food and have human or anthropomorphised characters, twenty-six (30 percent) contain textual or illustrative references to maternal figures involved in food preparation or provision. Examination of this data set reveals that there is a strong correlation between non-Anglo-Australian maternal figures and home-cooked meals, and a clear link between Anglo-Australian mothers and sugar-rich snacks. The relative paucity of depictions of ethnically unmarked mothers offering more nutritious foods is notable given the cultural expectations of mothers as caretakers of their children’s well-being. At the same time, the linking of non-Anglo-Australian mothers with home-cooked meals can be seen as a means of signifying a cultural authenticity, a closeness to the earth that is differentiated from the normalised Australian culture represented in picture books. This suggests an unintended alignment of mothers preparing and serving meals with “otherness,” which creates a distancing effect between meals that may generally be considered nutritious and the normalised self. I contend there are unexamined, and perhaps unexpected, cultural assumptions about ethnicity, motherhood, and food embedded in contemporary Australian picture books. These have the potential to inscribe a system of beliefs about gender, cultural identity, and food that contributes to readers’ understanding of the world and themselves.'

Source: Abstract.

Visual Identities : Australianness in Australian Picture Books Pam Macintyre , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Teaching Australian Literature : From Classroom Conversations to National Imaginings 2011; (p. 352-368)
‘The literature written for young people can be a vehicle for mediating change in mainstream attitudes, or it can confirm existing values. As with all literature, it carries ideologies. In this chapter, I will focus on the picture book, which constructs its meanings through dual visual and written texts. In particular, I will analyse selected, recent award-winning Australian picture books for their representations of ‘Australianness’.’ (From author’s introduction, p. 352)
Collecting Colour by Kylie Dunstan Lisa Hill , 2009 single work review
— Appears in: LisaHillSchoolStuff's Weblog 2009;

— Review of Collecting Colour Kylie Dunstan , 2008 single work picture book
The Children's Book Council of Australia Judges Report 2009 2009 single work column
— Appears in: Reading Time : The Journal of The Children's Book Council of Australia , August vol. 53 no. 3 2009; (p. 4-10)
Children Are the Winners Angie Schiavone , 2009 single work column
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 22-23 August 2009; (p. 33)
Untitled Rochelle Siemienowicz , 2008 single work review
— Appears in: Bookseller + Publisher Magazine , February vol. 87 no. 6 2008; (p. 22)

— Review of Collecting Colour Kylie Dunstan , 2008 single work picture book
This Week's Selections Katharine England , 2008 single work review
— Appears in: The Advertiser , 7 June 2008; (p. 12)

— Review of Collecting Colour Kylie Dunstan , 2008 single work picture book
[Untitled] Helen Purdie , 2008 single work review
— Appears in: Magpies : Talking About Books for Children , May vol. 23 no. 2 2008; (p. 31)

— Review of Collecting Colour Kylie Dunstan , 2008 single work picture book
Untitled Karen Cunningham , 2008 single work review
— Appears in: Reading Time : The Journal of the Children's Book Council of Australia , November vol. 52 no. 4 2008; (p. 26)

— Review of Collecting Colour Kylie Dunstan , 2008 single work picture book
Collecting Colour by Kylie Dunstan Lisa Hill , 2009 single work review
— Appears in: LisaHillSchoolStuff's Weblog 2009;

— Review of Collecting Colour Kylie Dunstan , 2008 single work picture book
Colourful Threads of a Friendship Deborah Bogle , 2009 single work column
— Appears in: The Advertiser , 22 August 2009; (p. 30-31)
Children Are the Winners Angie Schiavone , 2009 single work column
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 22-23 August 2009; (p. 33)
The Children's Book Council of Australia Judges Report 2009 2009 single work column
— Appears in: Reading Time : The Journal of The Children's Book Council of Australia , August vol. 53 no. 3 2009; (p. 4-10)
Visual Identities : Australianness in Australian Picture Books Pam Macintyre , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Teaching Australian Literature : From Classroom Conversations to National Imaginings 2011; (p. 352-368)
‘The literature written for young people can be a vehicle for mediating change in mainstream attitudes, or it can confirm existing values. As with all literature, it carries ideologies. In this chapter, I will focus on the picture book, which constructs its meanings through dual visual and written texts. In particular, I will analyse selected, recent award-winning Australian picture books for their representations of ‘Australianness’.’ (From author’s introduction, p. 352)
What Are We Feeding Our Children When We Read Them a Book? Depictions of Mothers and Food in Contemporary Australian Picture Books Laurel Cohn , 2016 single work criticism
— Appears in: Mothers and Food : Negotiating Foodways from Maternal Perspectives 2016; (p. 232-244)

'This chapter explores how Australian writers and illustrators in the twenty-first century depict the act of mothering in picture books for young children in relation to cooking and serving food. It draws on the idea that children’s texts can be understood as sites of cultural production and reproduction, with social conventions and ideologies embedded in their narrative representations. The analysis is based on a survey of 124 books that were shortlisted for, or won, Children’s Book Council of Australia awards between 2001 and 2013. Of the eighty-seven titles that contain food and have human or anthropomorphised characters, twenty-six (30 percent) contain textual or illustrative references to maternal figures involved in food preparation or provision. Examination of this data set reveals that there is a strong correlation between non-Anglo-Australian maternal figures and home-cooked meals, and a clear link between Anglo-Australian mothers and sugar-rich snacks. The relative paucity of depictions of ethnically unmarked mothers offering more nutritious foods is notable given the cultural expectations of mothers as caretakers of their children’s well-being. At the same time, the linking of non-Anglo-Australian mothers with home-cooked meals can be seen as a means of signifying a cultural authenticity, a closeness to the earth that is differentiated from the normalised Australian culture represented in picture books. This suggests an unintended alignment of mothers preparing and serving meals with “otherness,” which creates a distancing effect between meals that may generally be considered nutritious and the normalised self. I contend there are unexamined, and perhaps unexpected, cultural assumptions about ethnicity, motherhood, and food embedded in contemporary Australian picture books. These have the potential to inscribe a system of beliefs about gender, cultural identity, and food that contributes to readers’ understanding of the world and themselves.'

Source: Abstract.

Last amended 10 Jun 2021 16:42:14
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