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Issue Details: First known date: 2007... 2007 The Third Metropolis : Imagining Brisbane Through Art and Literature, 1940-1970
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'Post-war Brisbane has been a powerful source for the literary and artistic imagination - perhaps more so than any other Australian city. The cultural journal Meanjin began in Brisbane in 1940 and a number of significant poets worked in Brisbane around this time. In the visual arts, a vibrant scene flourished into the 1960s. Most famously, the two decades after the Second World War proved a powerful imaginative source for 'literary' writers such as David Malouf, Rodney Hall and Thea Astley.

'With a focus on the literary and visual arts - in particular poetry, the novel, and painting - The Third Metropolis considers the relationship of these works of art to the actual history of the city - political, economic and demographic.' (Publisher's blurb)

Notes

  • Foreword by Tom Shapcott.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Works about this Work

Engaging the Metaphorical City : Brisbane Male Fiction 1975-2007 Susan Carson , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Sweat : The Subtropical Imaginary 2011; (p. 45-53)
'Brisbane writers and writing are increasingly represented as important to the city's identity as a site of urban cool, at least in marketing and public relations paradigms. It is therefore remarkable that recent Brisbane fiction clings strongly to a particular relationship to the climatic and built environment that is often located in the past and which seemingly turns away, or at least elides, the 'new' technologically-driven Brisbane. Literary Brisbane is often depicted in the context of nostalgia for the Brisbane that once was—a tropical, timbered, luxuriant city in which sex is associated with heat, and, in particular, sweat. In this writing sweat can produced by adrenaline or heat, but in particular, in Brisbane novels, it is the sweat of sex that characterises the literary city. Given that Brisbane is in fact a subtropical city, it is interesting that metaphors of a tropical climate and vegetation occur so frequently in Brisbane stories (and narratives set in other parts of the state) that writer Thea Astley was prompted at one point to remark that Queensland writing was in danger of developing into a tropical cliché.' Susan Carson.
Untitled Philip Raymont , 2008 single work review
— Appears in: Reviews in Australian Studies , vol. 3 no. 2 2008;

— Review of The Third Metropolis : Imagining Brisbane Through Art and Literature, 1940-1970 William Hatherell , 2007 single work criticism
Untitled Jessica Carniel , 2008 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Literary Studies , vol. 23 no. 4 2008; (p. 501-503)

— Review of The Third Metropolis : Imagining Brisbane Through Art and Literature, 1940-1970 William Hatherell , 2007 single work criticism
Untitled Susan Sheridan , 2008 single work review
— Appears in: Journal of Australian Studies , June vol. 32 no. 2 2008; (p. 288-290)

— Review of The Third Metropolis : Imagining Brisbane Through Art and Literature, 1940-1970 William Hatherell , 2007 single work criticism
Untitled Simon Ryan , 2008 single work review
— Appears in: Queensland Review , vol. 15 no. 1 2008; (p. 134-135)

— Review of The Third Metropolis : Imagining Brisbane Through Art and Literature, 1940-1970 William Hatherell , 2007 single work criticism
A Queensland State of Mind Rosemary Sorensen , 2008 single work review
— Appears in: The Australian Literary Review , April vol. 3 no. 3 2008; (p. 13)

— Review of The Third Metropolis : Imagining Brisbane Through Art and Literature, 1940-1970 William Hatherell , 2007 single work criticism ; By the Book : A Literary History of Queensland 2007 anthology criticism
Untitled Anthony J. Hassall , 2008 single work review
— Appears in: JASAL , no. 8 2008; (p. 185-188)

— Review of The Third Metropolis : Imagining Brisbane Through Art and Literature, 1940-1970 William Hatherell , 2007 single work criticism ; Words to Walk By : Exploring Literary Brisbane Todd Barr , Rodney Sullivan , 2005 single work prose
Untitled Simon Ryan , 2008 single work review
— Appears in: Queensland Review , vol. 15 no. 1 2008; (p. 134-135)

— Review of The Third Metropolis : Imagining Brisbane Through Art and Literature, 1940-1970 William Hatherell , 2007 single work criticism
Untitled Susan Sheridan , 2008 single work review
— Appears in: Journal of Australian Studies , June vol. 32 no. 2 2008; (p. 288-290)

— Review of The Third Metropolis : Imagining Brisbane Through Art and Literature, 1940-1970 William Hatherell , 2007 single work criticism
Untitled Jessica Carniel , 2008 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Literary Studies , vol. 23 no. 4 2008; (p. 501-503)

— Review of The Third Metropolis : Imagining Brisbane Through Art and Literature, 1940-1970 William Hatherell , 2007 single work criticism
Engaging the Metaphorical City : Brisbane Male Fiction 1975-2007 Susan Carson , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Sweat : The Subtropical Imaginary 2011; (p. 45-53)
'Brisbane writers and writing are increasingly represented as important to the city's identity as a site of urban cool, at least in marketing and public relations paradigms. It is therefore remarkable that recent Brisbane fiction clings strongly to a particular relationship to the climatic and built environment that is often located in the past and which seemingly turns away, or at least elides, the 'new' technologically-driven Brisbane. Literary Brisbane is often depicted in the context of nostalgia for the Brisbane that once was—a tropical, timbered, luxuriant city in which sex is associated with heat, and, in particular, sweat. In this writing sweat can produced by adrenaline or heat, but in particular, in Brisbane novels, it is the sweat of sex that characterises the literary city. Given that Brisbane is in fact a subtropical city, it is interesting that metaphors of a tropical climate and vegetation occur so frequently in Brisbane stories (and narratives set in other parts of the state) that writer Thea Astley was prompted at one point to remark that Queensland writing was in danger of developing into a tropical cliché.' Susan Carson.
Last amended 12 Sep 2007 11:06:13
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