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Colloquies single work   poetry   "So many men"
Issue Details: First known date: 2007... 2007 Colloquies
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Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

  • Appears in:
    y separately published work icon Meanjin Heart Burn; Meanjin on Love, Sex & Desire vol. 66 no. 1 April 2007 Z1371775 2007 periodical issue 2007 pg. 67-71

Works about this Work

Written in White : A Reading of Kevin Hart’s ‘Colloquies’ Nathan Lyons , 2017 single work criticism
— Appears in: Literature and Theology , June vol. 31 no. 2 2017; (p. 149–163)

'The poem ‘Colloquies’ by Australian poet Kevin Hart can be read as a literary elaboration of Rabbi Isaac the Blind's theory of divine white writing. ‘Colloquies’ finds white writing in the pages of God s three books—scripture, nature, and time—and depicts the difficulty of understanding and responding to this obscure mode of revelation. Hart appropriates a range of theological sources (including Augustine, Aquinas, Ignatius of Loyola, and G. M. Hopkins) and recasts these sources in light of Rabbi Isaac’s paradoxical theory in order to illuminate in poetry the perplexities of a life lived coram Deo.' (Publication abstract)

Written in White : A Reading of Kevin Hart’s ‘Colloquies’ Nathan Lyons , 2017 single work criticism
— Appears in: Literature and Theology , June vol. 31 no. 2 2017; (p. 149–163)

'The poem ‘Colloquies’ by Australian poet Kevin Hart can be read as a literary elaboration of Rabbi Isaac the Blind's theory of divine white writing. ‘Colloquies’ finds white writing in the pages of God s three books—scripture, nature, and time—and depicts the difficulty of understanding and responding to this obscure mode of revelation. Hart appropriates a range of theological sources (including Augustine, Aquinas, Ignatius of Loyola, and G. M. Hopkins) and recasts these sources in light of Rabbi Isaac’s paradoxical theory in order to illuminate in poetry the perplexities of a life lived coram Deo.' (Publication abstract)

Last amended 10 Apr 2007 15:01:10
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