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Issue Details: First known date: 1938... 1938 Conditional Culture
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An essay explaining the aims and methods of the Jindyworobak Movement. 'The purpose of this book is to show that the blossoming of a distinctive Australian culture depends on certain conditions...They are... 1. A clear recognition of environmental values 2. The debunking of much nonsense 3. An understanding of Australia's history and traditions, primaeval, colonial and modern.'

Notes

  • Consists of two parts: 'Conditonal Culture', by Rex Ingamells, and 'Commentary', by Ian Tilbrook.
  • This work has been digitised by the Reason in Revolt project.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Works about this Work

Utopia and Ideology in the Vision of the Jindyworobaks Daniel Hempel , 2016 single work criticism
— Appears in: Journal of the European Association for Studies on Australia , vol. 7 no. 2 2016; (p. 4-14)
'This article discusses the vision behind the Jindyworobak movement in terms of its complex interplay between progressive utopianism and ideological regression. The Jindyworobaks, an Australian literary movement of the twentieth century, sought a deeper connection with the Australian environment based on appreciation and a willingness to learn from its indigenous traditions. At the same time, however, their writings still deny the Aboriginal subaltern a voice, and effectively perpetuate the power structures the Jindyworobaks seemingly oppose. This intriguing interplay forms the basis of this article, which draws on a conceptual framework inspired by Paul Ricœur, Ernst Bloch and Slavoj Zizek to map out the interactions between utopia and ideology in the vision of the Jindyworobaks.' (Publication abstract)
'Fearful Affinity' : Jindyworobak Primitivism Peter Kirkpatrick , 2014 single work criticism
— Appears in: Adelaide : A Literary City 2014; (p. 125-146)
This Piece of Hardwood, Cunningly Shaped : Rix Ingamells Kicks off the Jindyworobaks Nicholas Birns , 2013 single work criticism
— Appears in: Telling Stories : Australian Life and Literature 1935–2012 2013; (p. 23-30)
Local Moderns : The Jindyworobak Movement and Australian Modernism Ellen Smith , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Literary Studies , May vol. 27 no. 1 2012; (p. 1-17)
Australia - the Space that Is Not One : A Literary Approximation Gerhard Stilz , 2007 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australia : Making Space Meaningful 2007; (p. 27-43)
'Some dozen years ago, I rented a caravan in Adelaide for our family. It has a solid, glittering roo-bar in front and a prison-like wire-grating on the windscreen, fragmenting our view of the wide landscape into little safe squares. When we picked up that impressive vehicle, the rental manager routinely cautioned us that we should by all means stay on sealed roads, and he asked, just to make sure, "Are you going anywhere north of Port Augusta?" - "Yes," we said, "we would like to travel up to Alice and the Red Centre." - "Stuart Highway," he said, "but watch out, there's everything different there, you can get lost in no time, and you never know..." - "Know what?" we were about to ask, but that seemed too much of a sophistry in exchange for the goodly advise given by this good man, who did not look like a philosopher . Though a philosopher of sorts he may have been, following the thought-lines laid out through centuries of coping with dark and ill-defined spaces.' (Author's abstract)
Australia - the Space that Is Not One : A Literary Approximation Gerhard Stilz , 2007 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australia : Making Space Meaningful 2007; (p. 27-43)
'Some dozen years ago, I rented a caravan in Adelaide for our family. It has a solid, glittering roo-bar in front and a prison-like wire-grating on the windscreen, fragmenting our view of the wide landscape into little safe squares. When we picked up that impressive vehicle, the rental manager routinely cautioned us that we should by all means stay on sealed roads, and he asked, just to make sure, "Are you going anywhere north of Port Augusta?" - "Yes," we said, "we would like to travel up to Alice and the Red Centre." - "Stuart Highway," he said, "but watch out, there's everything different there, you can get lost in no time, and you never know..." - "Know what?" we were about to ask, but that seemed too much of a sophistry in exchange for the goodly advise given by this good man, who did not look like a philosopher . Though a philosopher of sorts he may have been, following the thought-lines laid out through centuries of coping with dark and ill-defined spaces.' (Author's abstract)
Local Moderns : The Jindyworobak Movement and Australian Modernism Ellen Smith , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Literary Studies , May vol. 27 no. 1 2012; (p. 1-17)
This Piece of Hardwood, Cunningly Shaped : Rix Ingamells Kicks off the Jindyworobaks Nicholas Birns , 2013 single work criticism
— Appears in: Telling Stories : Australian Life and Literature 1935–2012 2013; (p. 23-30)
'Fearful Affinity' : Jindyworobak Primitivism Peter Kirkpatrick , 2014 single work criticism
— Appears in: Adelaide : A Literary City 2014; (p. 125-146)
Utopia and Ideology in the Vision of the Jindyworobaks Daniel Hempel , 2016 single work criticism
— Appears in: Journal of the European Association for Studies on Australia , vol. 7 no. 2 2016; (p. 4-14)
'This article discusses the vision behind the Jindyworobak movement in terms of its complex interplay between progressive utopianism and ideological regression. The Jindyworobaks, an Australian literary movement of the twentieth century, sought a deeper connection with the Australian environment based on appreciation and a willingness to learn from its indigenous traditions. At the same time, however, their writings still deny the Aboriginal subaltern a voice, and effectively perpetuate the power structures the Jindyworobaks seemingly oppose. This intriguing interplay forms the basis of this article, which draws on a conceptual framework inspired by Paul Ricœur, Ernst Bloch and Slavoj Zizek to map out the interactions between utopia and ideology in the vision of the Jindyworobaks.' (Publication abstract)
Last amended 18 Apr 2011 14:27:50
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