AustLit logo
y separately published work icon Fairyland of Ida Rentoul Outhwaite selected work   children's fiction   poetry   short story   children's  
Note: Verses by Annie R. Rentoul; stories by Grenbry Outhwaite and Annie R. Rentoul.
Issue Details: First known date: 1926... 1926 Fairyland of Ida Rentoul Outhwaite
The material on this page is available to AustLit subscribers. If you are a subscriber or are from a subscribing organisation, please log in to gain full access. To explore options for subscribing to this unique teaching, research, and publishing resource for Australian culture and storytelling, please contact us or find out more.

Contents

* Contents derived from the Melbourne, Victoria,:Ramsay Publishing , 1926 version. Please note that other versions/publications may contain different contents. See the Publication Details.
The Shingle in Fairylandi"Imagine, I pray, the sensation and shock", Annie R. Rentoul , 1926 single work poetry

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Notes:
'The literary work in this volume, with the exception of the introductory verses and Serana, the Bush Fairy, is entirely written by Annie R. Rentoul.'
    • Melbourne, Victoria,: Ramsay Publishing , 1926 .
      Extent: 166p.
      Edition info: Edition-de-luxe
      Limited edition info: Edition limited to one thousand copies numbered and signed by the artist.
      Description: illus. (some col.)
      Note/s:
      • List of subscribers to "Fairyland" prior to 1st August, 1926 (p.163-166)
    • New York (City), New York (State),
      c
      United States of America (USA),
      c
      Americas,
      :
      Frederick A. Stokes ,
      1929 .
      Extent: 164p.
      Edition info: Authorized American ed.
      Description: illus. (some col.)
    • London,
      c
      England,
      c
      c
      United Kingdom (UK),
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      A. and C. Black ,
      1931 .
      Extent: 126p., [8] leaves of platesp.
      Description: illus. (some col.)

Works about this Work

The Disruption Of Fairyland : “Fairies Had Never Known How To Cry Until Then” Anita Callaway , 2013 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australasian Journal of Victorian Studies , vol. 18 no. 1 2013; (p. 17-27)

'This article considers the rise and fall of Ida Rentoul Outhwaite’s antipodean fairyland, her pictorial alternative to the masculinist vision of Australia at the nominal end of its colonial thraldom to Britain. Unlike their mischievous and anachronistic antecedents from Victorian Britain, Outhwaite’s fairies were both virtuous and up-to-date, presenting an idealised picture of how post-federation Australia might have been, had it been left in girlish hands. Outhwaite not only gave Australian girls entrée to a modern and serene femocracy, but offered her contemporaries a practical alternative to the closed-shop of traditional landscape painting. However, the gendered integrity of Outhwaite’s fairyland was short-lived. Her images progressively show marauding boys disrupting its harmony, much as their colonising fore-fathers had callously disrupted Terra Australis. Just as these fanciful episodes may be considered visual metaphors for the social oppression of women and even for the bully-boy ruthlessness of colonisation itself, the same images may also figuratively describe the eventual appropriation by conservative male painters of this feminine art speciality and its subsequent erasure from the orthodox history of Australian visual culture.' (Author's abstract)

Ida Rentoul Outhwaite; Annie R. Rentoul Rebecca Do Rozario , 2008 single work criticism
— Appears in: Fifty Books for Fifty Years : Celebrating Half a Century of Collecting 2008; (p. 15-16)
Ida Rentoul Outhwaite; Annie R. Rentoul Rebecca Do Rozario , 2008 single work criticism
— Appears in: Fifty Books for Fifty Years : Celebrating Half a Century of Collecting 2008; (p. 15-16)
The Disruption Of Fairyland : “Fairies Had Never Known How To Cry Until Then” Anita Callaway , 2013 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australasian Journal of Victorian Studies , vol. 18 no. 1 2013; (p. 17-27)

'This article considers the rise and fall of Ida Rentoul Outhwaite’s antipodean fairyland, her pictorial alternative to the masculinist vision of Australia at the nominal end of its colonial thraldom to Britain. Unlike their mischievous and anachronistic antecedents from Victorian Britain, Outhwaite’s fairies were both virtuous and up-to-date, presenting an idealised picture of how post-federation Australia might have been, had it been left in girlish hands. Outhwaite not only gave Australian girls entrée to a modern and serene femocracy, but offered her contemporaries a practical alternative to the closed-shop of traditional landscape painting. However, the gendered integrity of Outhwaite’s fairyland was short-lived. Her images progressively show marauding boys disrupting its harmony, much as their colonising fore-fathers had callously disrupted Terra Australis. Just as these fanciful episodes may be considered visual metaphors for the social oppression of women and even for the bully-boy ruthlessness of colonisation itself, the same images may also figuratively describe the eventual appropriation by conservative male painters of this feminine art speciality and its subsequent erasure from the orthodox history of Australian visual culture.' (Author's abstract)

Last amended 20 Sep 2007 10:45:33
Subjects:
Newspapers:
    Powered by Trove
    X