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y separately published work icon The Goat Who Sailed the World single work   children's fiction   children's   historical fiction  
Is part of Animal Stars Jackie French , 2006 series - author children's fiction (number 1 in series)
Issue Details: First known date: 2006... 2006 The Goat Who Sailed the World
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'Captain Cook's goat is the first of many historical animals to bring the past to life. the HM Bark Endeavour is sailing to tahiti to map the transit of Venus, but there are rumours that once the task is completed, Lieutenant James Cook has a set of secret orders - orders that command him to search for the Great South Land. Isaac is twelve and has joined the crew of the Endeavour as a master's servant, good for scrubbing decks and not much else. He's certainly not considered good enough to fetch hay for the Goat who will provide fresh milk for Cook and his officers. And this goat even has more experience at sea than Isaac - she has already sailed around the world once, watching the ocean and lands slip by from her spot on the quarterdeck. Over the months on board the Endeavour, a friendship grows between the Goat and Isaac, one that will last through shipwreck, bushfire and illness. A friendship that helps in the discovery of exotic new lands ... Ages 9 - 13' (Publication summary)

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Teaching Resources

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Teachers' notes via publisher's website.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • Pymble, Turramurra - Pymble - St Ives area, Sydney Northern Suburbs, Sydney, New South Wales,: HarperCollins Australia , 2006 .
      image of person or book cover 3289328713235677993.png
      Image courtesy of publisher's website.
      Extent: 215p.
      Description: illus., map
      Note/s:
      • Published: 24th July 2006
         
      ISBN: 0207200777

Works about this Work

'Why does it always have to end like this?' : On Board the Endeavour in Australian Children’s Fiction Nataša Kampmark , 2019 single work criticism
— Appears in: Journal of the European Association for Studies of Australia , vol. 10 no. 1 2019;

'Journals of the earliest British visitors to Australian shores facilitated the creation of the image of Australian Indigenous nations as savage, primitive and inferior in every aspect of their appearance and their way of life to both Europeans and indigenous peoples of other lands. In 1688, William Dampier described the inhabitants of “New Holland” as “the miserablest people in the world … having no [sic] one graceful feature in their faces.” In 1770, James Cook found the natives’ canoes “the worst … [he] ever saw” (A New Voyage ch. 16). The encounter took a hostile turn when beads and nails thrown at their feet failed to impress Aboriginal people and pave the way for a peaceful landing. Prejudiced descriptions and opinions justified European colonisation of Australia and dispossession of indigenous peoples. It took more than two centuries to revise those views. Literature was a powerful tool of colonisation and in turn was used by the colonised to oppose the coloniser. In this article, literature is examined as a tool for adopting fresh perspectives in education of new generations of young people in Australia about Cook’s discoveries on the Endeavour journey. The paper examines two children’s novels—The Goat Who Sailed the World by Jackie French (2006) and Captain Cook’s Apprentice by Anthony Hill (2008)—in order to demonstrate that these novels can be extremely important in educational, cultural and socio-political terms because they open the ground for a discussion of ideologies, social behaviour and cultural values in classroom, and thereby can contribute to the ongoing process of reconciliation in Australia.'

Source: Abstract.

Untitled Maureen Mann , 2006 single work review
— Appears in: Magpies : Talking About Books for Children , September vol. 21 no. 4 2006; (p. 35)

— Review of The Goat Who Sailed the World Jackie French , 2006 single work children's fiction
The Goat Who Sailed the World Lyn Linning , 2006 single work review
— Appears in: Viewpoint : On Books for Young Adults , Summer vol. 14 no. 4 2006; (p. 21)

— Review of The Goat Who Sailed the World Jackie French , 2006 single work children's fiction
Book Briefs Lucy Sussex , 2006 single work review
— Appears in: The West Australian , 26 August 2006; (p. 6)

— Review of The Goat Who Sailed the World Jackie French , 2006 single work children's fiction
Cover Notes Lucy Sussex , 2006 single work review
— Appears in: The Sunday Age , 12 August 2006; (p. 30)

— Review of The Goat Who Sailed the World Jackie French , 2006 single work children's fiction
Cover Notes Lucy Sussex , 2006 single work review
— Appears in: The Sunday Age , 12 August 2006; (p. 30)

— Review of The Goat Who Sailed the World Jackie French , 2006 single work children's fiction
Book Briefs Lucy Sussex , 2006 single work review
— Appears in: The West Australian , 26 August 2006; (p. 6)

— Review of The Goat Who Sailed the World Jackie French , 2006 single work children's fiction
The Goat Who Sailed the World Lyn Linning , 2006 single work review
— Appears in: Viewpoint : On Books for Young Adults , Summer vol. 14 no. 4 2006; (p. 21)

— Review of The Goat Who Sailed the World Jackie French , 2006 single work children's fiction
Untitled Maureen Mann , 2006 single work review
— Appears in: Magpies : Talking About Books for Children , September vol. 21 no. 4 2006; (p. 35)

— Review of The Goat Who Sailed the World Jackie French , 2006 single work children's fiction
'Why does it always have to end like this?' : On Board the Endeavour in Australian Children’s Fiction Nataša Kampmark , 2019 single work criticism
— Appears in: Journal of the European Association for Studies of Australia , vol. 10 no. 1 2019;

'Journals of the earliest British visitors to Australian shores facilitated the creation of the image of Australian Indigenous nations as savage, primitive and inferior in every aspect of their appearance and their way of life to both Europeans and indigenous peoples of other lands. In 1688, William Dampier described the inhabitants of “New Holland” as “the miserablest people in the world … having no [sic] one graceful feature in their faces.” In 1770, James Cook found the natives’ canoes “the worst … [he] ever saw” (A New Voyage ch. 16). The encounter took a hostile turn when beads and nails thrown at their feet failed to impress Aboriginal people and pave the way for a peaceful landing. Prejudiced descriptions and opinions justified European colonisation of Australia and dispossession of indigenous peoples. It took more than two centuries to revise those views. Literature was a powerful tool of colonisation and in turn was used by the colonised to oppose the coloniser. In this article, literature is examined as a tool for adopting fresh perspectives in education of new generations of young people in Australia about Cook’s discoveries on the Endeavour journey. The paper examines two children’s novels—The Goat Who Sailed the World by Jackie French (2006) and Captain Cook’s Apprentice by Anthony Hill (2008)—in order to demonstrate that these novels can be extremely important in educational, cultural and socio-political terms because they open the ground for a discussion of ideologies, social behaviour and cultural values in classroom, and thereby can contribute to the ongoing process of reconciliation in Australia.'

Source: Abstract.

Last amended 14 Apr 2020 10:44:44
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