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y separately published work icon Metro single work   novel   satire  
Issue Details: First known date: 2006... 2006 Metro
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'Liam Kelly is the very model of the modern male - boys want to be him, girls want to be with him. He and his group of loyal mates spend their days driving around town, drinking beer and very occasionally going to lectures. His good looks compensate, everyone agrees, for his superior attitude and private-school arrogance. Liam and his girlfriend Sara seem to be the perfect couple, but when she leaves for a European trip without him, the facade begins to crumble. He sees six months of freedom ahead, unaware that the consequences of his bad-boy behaviour will threaten the image he has so carefully created. Metro is a satirical tale of morality, masculinity and money from the internationally acclaimed author of Sushi Central.' (Backcover)

Notes

  • Dedication: For Chad

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • St Lucia, Indooroopilly - St Lucia area, Brisbane - North West, Brisbane, Queensland,: University of Queensland Press , 2006 .
      image of person or book cover 3546320918617393729.png
      Image courtesy of publisher's website.
      Extent: 297p.
      Note/s:
      • Portrait on backcover.
      ISBN: 0702235539, 9780702235535
    • London,
      c
      England,
      c
      c
      United Kingdom (UK),
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Burning House ,
      2008 .
      image of person or book cover 2318865844179288428.jpeg
      This image has been sourced from online.
      Extent: 320p.
      ISBN: 1905636180, 9781905636181

Works about this Work

'When Everything Old is New Again' : Class, Consumerism and Masculinity in Alasdair Duncan's Metro Vivienne Muller , Penny Holliday , 2009 single work criticism
— Appears in: Journal of Australian Studies , December vol. 33 no. 4 2009; (p. 431-443)
'Alasdair Duncan's narrative Metro, set in Brisbane in the early twenty-first century, focuses on Liam, an unapologetically self-styled white 'upper middle-class brat' whose sense of place and identity is firmly mapped by spatial and economic co-ordinates. This article considers the linkages between spatiality and identity in Duncan's narrative, as well as the ways in which traditional, hegemonic (heterosexual) forms of masculinity are re-invigorated in the enactment of an upper middle-class script of success, privilege and consumerism. It argues that the safeguarding of these hegemonic forms of masculine identity involves strategies of spatial and bodily expression underpinned by conspicuous consumption, relegating other forms of sexual identity to an exploitable periphery. (p. 431)
Untitled Ryan Paine , 2007 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , April no. 290 2007; (p. 62)

— Review of Metro Alasdair Duncan , 2006 single work novel
Metro Sexual Phil Brown , 2006 single work review
— Appears in: Brisbane News , 26 July - 1 August no. 597 2006; (p. 25)

— Review of Metro Alasdair Duncan , 2006 single work novel
Skim Andrew Stafford , 2006 single work review
— Appears in: The Bulletin , 19 September vol. 124 no. 6538 2006; (p. 76)

— Review of Monica Bloom Nick Earls , 2006 single work novel ; Metro Alasdair Duncan , 2006 single work novel
A Creepy World of Sex, Drugs and Hard Hearts Peter Pierce , 2006 single work review
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 9-10 September 2006; (p. 30-31)

— Review of Metro Alasdair Duncan , 2006 single work novel
Fiction Cameron Woodhead , 2006 single work review
— Appears in: The Age , 12 August 2006; (p. 25)

— Review of Metro Alasdair Duncan , 2006 single work novel ; Inventing Beatrice Jill Golden , 2006 single work novel ; The Messenger Markus Zusak , 2002 single work novel
Metro Sexual Central Nick Bray , 2006 single work review
— Appears in: The Courier-Mail , 12 - 13 August 2006; (p. 18)

— Review of Metro Alasdair Duncan , 2006 single work novel ; The Dark Part of Me Belinda Burns , 2006 single work novel
When It's Down to Sex, Literary Lovers Come Good Rosemary Sorensen , 2006 single work review
— Appears in: The Australian Literary Review , September vol. 1 no. 1 2006; (p. 11)

— Review of Listen Kate Veitch , 2006 single work novel ; Metro Alasdair Duncan , 2006 single work novel ; Silent Parts John Charalambous , 2006 single work novel ; The Long Road of the Junkmailer Patrick Holland , 2006 single work novel
A Creepy World of Sex, Drugs and Hard Hearts Peter Pierce , 2006 single work review
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 9-10 September 2006; (p. 30-31)

— Review of Metro Alasdair Duncan , 2006 single work novel
Skim Andrew Stafford , 2006 single work review
— Appears in: The Bulletin , 19 September vol. 124 no. 6538 2006; (p. 76)

— Review of Monica Bloom Nick Earls , 2006 single work novel ; Metro Alasdair Duncan , 2006 single work novel
'When Everything Old is New Again' : Class, Consumerism and Masculinity in Alasdair Duncan's Metro Vivienne Muller , Penny Holliday , 2009 single work criticism
— Appears in: Journal of Australian Studies , December vol. 33 no. 4 2009; (p. 431-443)
'Alasdair Duncan's narrative Metro, set in Brisbane in the early twenty-first century, focuses on Liam, an unapologetically self-styled white 'upper middle-class brat' whose sense of place and identity is firmly mapped by spatial and economic co-ordinates. This article considers the linkages between spatiality and identity in Duncan's narrative, as well as the ways in which traditional, hegemonic (heterosexual) forms of masculinity are re-invigorated in the enactment of an upper middle-class script of success, privilege and consumerism. It argues that the safeguarding of these hegemonic forms of masculine identity involves strategies of spatial and bodily expression underpinned by conspicuous consumption, relegating other forms of sexual identity to an exploitable periphery. (p. 431)
Last amended 14 Jun 2017 10:29:03
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