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y separately published work icon Rifling Paradise single work   novel   historical fiction  
Issue Details: First known date: 2006... 2006 Rifling Paradise
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

When past indiscretions catch up with Charles Redbourne, a minor English landowner, he is propelled from England to Australia. There, his life begins to change dramatically, not least when he meets his host's artistic daughter. But it is on an expedition in search of scientific specimens in the Blue Mountains that events take a terrifying turn. (Publisher's blurb)

Notes

  • Dedication: For Kay, Tom and Tobi.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • London,
      c
      England,
      c
      c
      United Kingdom (UK),
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Sceptre ,
      2006 .
      Extent: 325p.
      ISBN: 034092165X, 9780340921654

Other Formats

  • Also sound recording, large print.

Works about this Work

The Matter of Fact : Science and Identity in Contemporary Australian Literature Anna-Sophie Jürgens , 2019 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Humanities Review , November no. 65 2019;

'To pursue ‘knowledge per se’, to unlock ‘the secrets of the organism’ and to act as an explorer ‘not of untrodden lands, perhaps, but of the mysteries of nature’—these are the reasons why the naturalist William Caldwell travels to Australia in Nicholas Drayson’s 2007 novel Love and the Platypus (9, 59, 144). Caldwell’s research is ‘purely platypusical’ (98): he aims to determine whether the platypus really does lay eggs. The ‘spirit of discovery—that was why he was here, was it not?’ (3) The spirit of discovery and the obsessive nature of his scientific enquiry appear to characterise Drayson’s protagonist as a scientist. However, as I hope to show in this paper, the definition of the literary scientist-protagonist—or its stereotype, in the words of Roslynn Haynes—is open for debate when it comes to the practice of science in fiction. To prove my point, I investigate how the practice of science in contemporary Australian fiction intertwines with identity narratives. As shown in the following, these narratives revolve around the reasons and ambitions of fictional protagonists to engage with science.' (Introduction)

Science/Literature: The Interface Jessica White , Clare Archer-Lean , 2019 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Humanities Review , November no. 65 2019;
'This special section of the Australian Humanities Review emerged from the Literary Studies Convention at the Australian National University from 3-7 July 2018. As a conference which brought together Australia’s four major literary studies associations, it showcased a range of approaches to literary scholarship to discuss ‘the literary as an interface between different forms of knowledge and processes of knowledge formation, looking at questions of how and through what means the literary is communicated, represented, negotiated, and remade’. One of the approaches prompted by this theme was the ways in which literature can translate, communicate, or re-imagine scientific knowledge. This seemed particularly apt given that one of the definitions of ‘interface’ is ‘an apparatus designed to connect two scientific instruments so that they can be operated jointly’ (Oxford English Dictionary), for example, two different computer operating systems. In other words, the interface is the meeting place which allows translation to occur.' (Introduction)
Eight Great Australian Fictional Scientists Worth Reading about Anna-Sophie Jürgens , 2019 single work
— Appears in: The Conversation , 12 February 2019;

'Australian scientists have led many crucial scientific breakthroughs – from the manufacturing and processing of penicillin, to the first in-vitro fertilisation pregnancy. Yet there is still a need for science to be more widely appreciated in our broader culture.' (Introduction)

Change the Sky Nicholas Drayson , 2006 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , August no. 283 2006; (p. 61)

— Review of Rifling Paradise Jem Poster , 2006 single work novel
Skim Sally Blakeney , 2006 single work review
— Appears in: The Bulletin , 9 May vol. 124 no. 6519 2006; (p. 68-69)

— Review of Rifling Paradise Jem Poster , 2006 single work novel
Victorian Ghosts Go Bush Stella Clarke , 2006 single work review
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 13-14 May 2006; (p. 12)

— Review of Rifling Paradise Jem Poster , 2006 single work novel
The Birds and the Boys Tom Payne , 2006 single work review
— Appears in: The Daily Telegraph , 18 March 2006; (p. 10)

— Review of Rifling Paradise Jem Poster , 2006 single work novel
Guilty Pleasures James Ley , 2006 single work review
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 25-26 February 2006; (p. 20)

— Review of Rifling Paradise Jem Poster , 2006 single work novel
Strangers in an Even Stranger Land Hugo Barnacle , 2006 single work review
— Appears in: The Sunday Times , 19 February 2006; (p. 55)

— Review of Rifling Paradise Jem Poster , 2006 single work novel ; The Secret River Kate Grenville , 2006 single work novel
Stuff the Wallabies Jonathan Bate , 2006 single work review
— Appears in: The Guardian , 11 February 2006; (p. 17)

— Review of Rifling Paradise Jem Poster , 2006 single work novel
Belonging Is Where You Imagine You Want To Be Jane Cornwell , 2006 single work column
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 6-7 May 2006; (p. 8-9)
Eight Great Australian Fictional Scientists Worth Reading about Anna-Sophie Jürgens , 2019 single work
— Appears in: The Conversation , 12 February 2019;

'Australian scientists have led many crucial scientific breakthroughs – from the manufacturing and processing of penicillin, to the first in-vitro fertilisation pregnancy. Yet there is still a need for science to be more widely appreciated in our broader culture.' (Introduction)

Science/Literature: The Interface Jessica White , Clare Archer-Lean , 2019 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Humanities Review , November no. 65 2019;
'This special section of the Australian Humanities Review emerged from the Literary Studies Convention at the Australian National University from 3-7 July 2018. As a conference which brought together Australia’s four major literary studies associations, it showcased a range of approaches to literary scholarship to discuss ‘the literary as an interface between different forms of knowledge and processes of knowledge formation, looking at questions of how and through what means the literary is communicated, represented, negotiated, and remade’. One of the approaches prompted by this theme was the ways in which literature can translate, communicate, or re-imagine scientific knowledge. This seemed particularly apt given that one of the definitions of ‘interface’ is ‘an apparatus designed to connect two scientific instruments so that they can be operated jointly’ (Oxford English Dictionary), for example, two different computer operating systems. In other words, the interface is the meeting place which allows translation to occur.' (Introduction)
The Matter of Fact : Science and Identity in Contemporary Australian Literature Anna-Sophie Jürgens , 2019 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Humanities Review , November no. 65 2019;

'To pursue ‘knowledge per se’, to unlock ‘the secrets of the organism’ and to act as an explorer ‘not of untrodden lands, perhaps, but of the mysteries of nature’—these are the reasons why the naturalist William Caldwell travels to Australia in Nicholas Drayson’s 2007 novel Love and the Platypus (9, 59, 144). Caldwell’s research is ‘purely platypusical’ (98): he aims to determine whether the platypus really does lay eggs. The ‘spirit of discovery—that was why he was here, was it not?’ (3) The spirit of discovery and the obsessive nature of his scientific enquiry appear to characterise Drayson’s protagonist as a scientist. However, as I hope to show in this paper, the definition of the literary scientist-protagonist—or its stereotype, in the words of Roslynn Haynes—is open for debate when it comes to the practice of science in fiction. To prove my point, I investigate how the practice of science in contemporary Australian fiction intertwines with identity narratives. As shown in the following, these narratives revolve around the reasons and ambitions of fictional protagonists to engage with science.' (Introduction)

Last amended 2 Jan 2008 10:26:32
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