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Issue Details: First known date: 2003... 2003 The Artificial Horizon : Imagining the Blue Mountains
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Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • Carlton, Parkville - Carlton area, Melbourne - North, Melbourne, Victoria,: Melbourne University Press , 2003 .
      Extent: viii, 313 p.p.
      Description: illus., map
      Note/s:
      • Includes index. Bibliography: p. 301-307.
      ISBN: 0522850723

Works about this Work

Love and Vertigo : The Blue Mountains as Veranda in Australian Women's Writing Elizabeth Hicks , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Antipodes , December vol. 25 no. 2 2011; (p. 171-175)
The Blue Mountains have often been used as a backdrop in Australian literature. Elizabeth Hicks looks at several of these texts by Australian women which were written during the fifteen years between 1987 and 2002, a period which loosley corresponds to theat of third-wave feminism.
[Review Essay] The Artificial Horizon : Imagining the Blue Mountains Kevin Jones , 2004 single work essay
— Appears in: Australian Aboriginal Studies , no. 1 2004; (p. 113-115)

Martin Thomas’ cultural study of the Blue Mountains is developed using a familiar technique of juxtaposition and antithesis, derived ultimately from Saussure and Lévi-Strauss. It is focused on four main topics in the history and folklore of the area: European exploration narratives and paintings; Aboriginal myths which have accrued or been invented for the place; the fascinations of its topography and cliffs and the tourism paraphernalia that surround them; and a highly discursive account of the early life and, in 1957, the death of V Gordon Childe, in his generation the pre-eminent archaeologist of Europe and the Middle East. An overarching theme is that of the mountains as the labyrinth—‘the most pervasive colonial metaphor for the topography [of the Blue Mountains]’ —threatening loss and death. The settlements perched on the narrow ridgelines express ‘the unsettled quality of settler life’ (p.81). Along the way there are some useful polemics against the environmentalist gospel of the Maxvision film The edge; against the notion of wilderness; against the small and now dispersed museum of capricious and grotesque ethnology put together in a small-time private museum (by a man named Mel Ward); or against the destruction of the small, ‘wrong side of the tracks’, predominantly Aboriginal community of Catalina, for the sake of development of a race track. (Just to give a sense of the flavour of the writing, the last is titled ‘Homage to Catalina’, with its implied reference to Orwell, and to lost causes.)'  (Introduction)

Love and Vertigo : The Blue Mountains as Veranda in Australian Women's Writing Elizabeth Hicks , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Antipodes , December vol. 25 no. 2 2011; (p. 171-175)
The Blue Mountains have often been used as a backdrop in Australian literature. Elizabeth Hicks looks at several of these texts by Australian women which were written during the fifteen years between 1987 and 2002, a period which loosley corresponds to theat of third-wave feminism.
[Review Essay] The Artificial Horizon : Imagining the Blue Mountains Kevin Jones , 2004 single work essay
— Appears in: Australian Aboriginal Studies , no. 1 2004; (p. 113-115)

Martin Thomas’ cultural study of the Blue Mountains is developed using a familiar technique of juxtaposition and antithesis, derived ultimately from Saussure and Lévi-Strauss. It is focused on four main topics in the history and folklore of the area: European exploration narratives and paintings; Aboriginal myths which have accrued or been invented for the place; the fascinations of its topography and cliffs and the tourism paraphernalia that surround them; and a highly discursive account of the early life and, in 1957, the death of V Gordon Childe, in his generation the pre-eminent archaeologist of Europe and the Middle East. An overarching theme is that of the mountains as the labyrinth—‘the most pervasive colonial metaphor for the topography [of the Blue Mountains]’ —threatening loss and death. The settlements perched on the narrow ridgelines express ‘the unsettled quality of settler life’ (p.81). Along the way there are some useful polemics against the environmentalist gospel of the Maxvision film The edge; against the notion of wilderness; against the small and now dispersed museum of capricious and grotesque ethnology put together in a small-time private museum (by a man named Mel Ward); or against the destruction of the small, ‘wrong side of the tracks’, predominantly Aboriginal community of Catalina, for the sake of development of a race track. (Just to give a sense of the flavour of the writing, the last is titled ‘Homage to Catalina’, with its implied reference to Orwell, and to lost causes.)'  (Introduction)

Last amended 2 Feb 2006 09:12:18
Subjects:
  • Blue Mountains, Sydney, New South Wales,
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