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This image has been sourced from Fishpond website
y separately published work icon Tracker Tjugingji single work   picture book   children's   Indigenous story  
Issue Details: First known date: 2003... 2003 Tracker Tjugingji
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'Tracker Tjugingji lived out bush with his family. They camped in little windbreak shelters, and Tjugingji used to sleep on the ground next to his parents. One time Tracker Tjugingji's parents decided to go to a big lake, a long way east of where they were camped... Tjugingji wanted to go too, but he didn't expect the trip to be quite such an adventure. This book also includes a CD of The Animal Song, a lively tune about kangaroos hopping, dingoes howling and big emus walking.' (Source: fishpond website)

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • Alice Springs, Southern Northern Territory, Northern Territory,: IAD Press , 2003 .
      image of person or book cover 8415913882658590684.jpeg
      This image has been sourced from Fishpond website
      Extent: 1v.p.
      Description: col. illus.
      Note/s:
      • Includes CD-ROM.
      ISBN: 1864650303
    • Alice Springs, Southern Northern Territory, Northern Territory,: Jukurrpa Books , 2012 .
      Extent: 1 v.p.
      Edition info: 2nd ed.
      ISBN: 9781864651263 (pbk.) :

Works about this Work

Tracker Tjugingji Tony Duke , 2012 single work column
— Appears in: National Indigenous Times , 4 July no. 271 2012; (p. 35)
Situating Childhood: A Reading of Spatiality in Aboriginal Picture Books Trish Lunt , 2005 single work criticism
— Appears in: Papers : Explorations into Children's Literature , May vol. 15 no. 1 2005; (p. 59-67)
In this essay, Lunt's objective is to read spatiality in Aboriginal picture books through the representations of inhabitation and spatial phenomena. The analysis focuses on Bob Randall and Kunyi June-Anne McInerney's Tracker Tjugingji (2003) which Lunt argues, invites readers to share a journey in and through cultural constructions of spatiality. Elaine Russell's A is for Aunty (2000) creates a montage of performative spatiality that links space and time while in Russell's most recent picture book, The Shack That Dad Built (2004), representations of spatiality are personified by embodiment. All three texts offer new ways of understanding spatiality and says Lunt, invite further explorations of 'the spatialisation of Australian childhood' (67).
Untitled Lynette Sebbens , 2004 single work review
— Appears in: Reading Time : The Journal of the Children's Book Council of Australia , February vol. 48 no. 1 2004; (p. 15-16)

— Review of Tracker Tjugingji Bob Randall , 2003 single work picture book
Untitled Lynette Sebbens , 2004 single work review
— Appears in: Reading Time : The Journal of the Children's Book Council of Australia , February vol. 48 no. 1 2004; (p. 15-16)

— Review of Tracker Tjugingji Bob Randall , 2003 single work picture book
Situating Childhood: A Reading of Spatiality in Aboriginal Picture Books Trish Lunt , 2005 single work criticism
— Appears in: Papers : Explorations into Children's Literature , May vol. 15 no. 1 2005; (p. 59-67)
In this essay, Lunt's objective is to read spatiality in Aboriginal picture books through the representations of inhabitation and spatial phenomena. The analysis focuses on Bob Randall and Kunyi June-Anne McInerney's Tracker Tjugingji (2003) which Lunt argues, invites readers to share a journey in and through cultural constructions of spatiality. Elaine Russell's A is for Aunty (2000) creates a montage of performative spatiality that links space and time while in Russell's most recent picture book, The Shack That Dad Built (2004), representations of spatiality are personified by embodiment. All three texts offer new ways of understanding spatiality and says Lunt, invite further explorations of 'the spatialisation of Australian childhood' (67).
Tracker Tjugingji Tony Duke , 2012 single work column
— Appears in: National Indigenous Times , 4 July no. 271 2012; (p. 35)
Last amended 9 Dec 2014 15:28:53
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