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Issue Details: First known date: 2003... 2003 A Place on Earth : An Anthology of Nature Writing from Australia and North America
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Notes

  • Dedication: For Maree
  • Contents indexed selectively.
  • Includes editor's note on variations in language usage, pages 21-23.

Contents

* Contents derived from the Lincoln, Nebraska,
c
United States of America (USA),
c
Americas,
:
Sydney, New South Wales,:University of Nebraska Press ,University of New South Wales Press , 2003 version. Please note that other versions/publications may contain different contents. See the Publication Details.
Belonging to Here: An Introduction, Mark Tredinnick , single work essay (p. 25-47)
Symptoms of Place, Barbara Blackman , single work essay (p. 49-54)
Beneath Capital Hill : The Unconformities of Place and Self, John Cameron , single work essay (p. 55-63)
The Centre, Charmian Clift , single work prose (p. 65-68)
Cooper Dreaming, Tom Griffiths , single work essay (p. 81-89)
True Blue Ultramarine, Ashley Hay , single work essay (p. 101-106)
The Red Steer at Rat Bay, P. R. Hay , single work essay (p. 107-112)
Tangibles, William J. Lines , single work essay (p. 147-157)
Home Ground, Michael McCoy , single work essay (p. 177-180)
A Rogaine, Patrice Newell , single work essay (p. 193-197)
My Places, Eric Rolls , single work essay (p. 207-213)
Landing, Tim Winton , single work essay (p. 265-268)

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Works about this Work

Encounters with Amnesia: Confronting the Ghosts of Australian Landscape Inga Simpson , 2019 single work essay
— Appears in: Griffith Review , January no. 63 2019; (p. 272-281)

'Nature writing has never been more popular. In recent years it has become an international publishing phenomenon, with titles such as Helen Macdonald's 'H is for Hawk' (Jonathan Cape, 2014), Robert Macfarlane's 'Landmarks' (Hamish Hamilton, 2015), Amy Liptrot's 'The Outrun' (Canongate, 2016) and Sy Montgomery's 'How to be a Good Creature' (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2018) scoring significant worldwide success. Australia, too, has its own rich history of nature writing. For more than a century, nature writing was 'the' primary literature for writing the country; a vital part of the ongoing process, for settler-Australians, of coming to feel at home in what were initially unfamiliar environments, and of creating a sense of national identity around them. Yet, today, nature writing is not widely known or understood here, and it's apparent that more Australians have read 'H is for Hawk' (18,000 copies sold so far according to Bookscan) than any of our own contemporary works.' (Publication abstract)

 

Untitled Veronica Brady , 2004 single work review
— Appears in: Southerly , vol. 64 no. 2 2004; (p. 176-182)

— Review of A Place on Earth : An Anthology of Nature Writing from Australia and North America 2003 anthology essay prose
Nonfiction Heather Rose , 2004 single work review
— Appears in: Island , Autumn no. 96 2004; (p. 73-78)

— Review of A Place on Earth : An Anthology of Nature Writing from Australia and North America 2003 anthology essay prose ; Haunted Earth Peter Read , 2003 single work prose
A Deep Sense of Unease Kim Mahood , 2004 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , February no. 258 2004; (p. 26)

— Review of A Place on Earth : An Anthology of Nature Writing from Australia and North America 2003 anthology essay prose
Spirit Land Gregg Borschmann , 2004 single work review
— Appears in: The Bulletin , 3 February vol. 122 no. 6406 2004; (p. 68-69)

— Review of Haunted Earth Peter Read , 2003 single work prose ; A Place on Earth : An Anthology of Nature Writing from Australia and North America 2003 anthology essay prose
A Literature Grounded in Place Mark McKenna , 2003 single work review
— Appears in: The Canberra Times , 13 December 2003; (p. 8a)

— Review of A Place on Earth : An Anthology of Nature Writing from Australia and North America 2003 anthology essay prose
Nature Dianne Dempsey , 2003 single work review
— Appears in: The Age , 27 December 2003; (p. 12)

— Review of A Place on Earth : An Anthology of Nature Writing from Australia and North America 2003 anthology essay prose
Spirit Land Gregg Borschmann , 2004 single work review
— Appears in: The Bulletin , 3 February vol. 122 no. 6406 2004; (p. 68-69)

— Review of Haunted Earth Peter Read , 2003 single work prose ; A Place on Earth : An Anthology of Nature Writing from Australia and North America 2003 anthology essay prose
A Deep Sense of Unease Kim Mahood , 2004 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , February no. 258 2004; (p. 26)

— Review of A Place on Earth : An Anthology of Nature Writing from Australia and North America 2003 anthology essay prose
Nonfiction Heather Rose , 2004 single work review
— Appears in: Island , Autumn no. 96 2004; (p. 73-78)

— Review of A Place on Earth : An Anthology of Nature Writing from Australia and North America 2003 anthology essay prose ; Haunted Earth Peter Read , 2003 single work prose
Encounters with Amnesia: Confronting the Ghosts of Australian Landscape Inga Simpson , 2019 single work essay
— Appears in: Griffith Review , January no. 63 2019; (p. 272-281)

'Nature writing has never been more popular. In recent years it has become an international publishing phenomenon, with titles such as Helen Macdonald's 'H is for Hawk' (Jonathan Cape, 2014), Robert Macfarlane's 'Landmarks' (Hamish Hamilton, 2015), Amy Liptrot's 'The Outrun' (Canongate, 2016) and Sy Montgomery's 'How to be a Good Creature' (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2018) scoring significant worldwide success. Australia, too, has its own rich history of nature writing. For more than a century, nature writing was 'the' primary literature for writing the country; a vital part of the ongoing process, for settler-Australians, of coming to feel at home in what were initially unfamiliar environments, and of creating a sense of national identity around them. Yet, today, nature writing is not widely known or understood here, and it's apparent that more Australians have read 'H is for Hawk' (18,000 copies sold so far according to Bookscan) than any of our own contemporary works.' (Publication abstract)

 

Last amended 14 Feb 2005 09:44:53
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