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y separately published work icon The Vodka Dialogue single work   novel   detective   humour  
Is part of Cassidy Blair Kirsty Brooks , 2003 series - author novel
Issue Details: First known date: 2003... 2003 The Vodka Dialogue
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Notes

  • Featured by the BIG Book Club, an initiative supported by The Advertiser in partnership with Arts SA, The Australia Council for the Arts, Channel 7 and FIVEAA to promote a love of reading, discussion and literature, September 2003.
  • Epigraph: If women dressed for men, the clothes stores wouldn't sell much - just the occasional sun visor : Groucho Marx
  • Book one of the Cassidy Blair Series.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Works about this Work

Crime Scenes : The Importance of Place in Australian Crime Fiction Michael X. Savvas , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Journeying and Journalling : Creative and Critical Meditations on Travel Writing 2010; (p. 204-213)
'There are eight million stories about crime fiction. And this is one of them. There are two main ways in which writers use place in crime fiction. The first way is to use place to help create a certain mood and atmosphere. The second way is to use the geographical or physical features of a place imaginatively as a plot device. Sometimes the journeys that are made by characters in crime fiction serve to remind us as readers of these two major devices. Although historically a lot of Australian crime fiction has not focused on place in terms of setting, this is changing as Australia continues to change. (Author's introduction, 204)
Criminal Intent Samela Harris , 2003 single work column
— Appears in: The Advertiser , 20 September 2003; (p. 3)
Suburban Stealth and Tipple Brigid Delaney , 2003 single work review
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 13-14 September 2003; (p. 16)

— Review of The Vodka Dialogue Kirsty Brooks , 2003 single work novel
Latest Twist in Girls-Own Genre Alexandra Economou , 2003 single work column
— Appears in: The Advertiser , 6 September 2003; (p. 38)
Women Establish Credentials for Long Lives in Crime Lucy Sussex , 2003 single work review
— Appears in: The Sunday Age , 31 August 2003; (p. 10)

— Review of The Vodka Dialogue Kirsty Brooks , 2003 single work novel ; Who Killed Camilla? Emma Darcy , 2003 single work novel
Crime Cocktail Short on Spirits Kathy Hunt , 2003 single work review
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 23-24 August 2003; (p. 10-11)

— Review of The Vodka Dialogue Kirsty Brooks , 2003 single work novel
Women Establish Credentials for Long Lives in Crime Lucy Sussex , 2003 single work review
— Appears in: The Sunday Age , 31 August 2003; (p. 10)

— Review of The Vodka Dialogue Kirsty Brooks , 2003 single work novel ; Who Killed Camilla? Emma Darcy , 2003 single work novel
Suburban Stealth and Tipple Brigid Delaney , 2003 single work review
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 13-14 September 2003; (p. 16)

— Review of The Vodka Dialogue Kirsty Brooks , 2003 single work novel
Latest Twist in Girls-Own Genre Alexandra Economou , 2003 single work column
— Appears in: The Advertiser , 6 September 2003; (p. 38)
Criminal Intent Samela Harris , 2003 single work column
— Appears in: The Advertiser , 20 September 2003; (p. 3)
Crime Scenes : The Importance of Place in Australian Crime Fiction Michael X. Savvas , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Journeying and Journalling : Creative and Critical Meditations on Travel Writing 2010; (p. 204-213)
'There are eight million stories about crime fiction. And this is one of them. There are two main ways in which writers use place in crime fiction. The first way is to use place to help create a certain mood and atmosphere. The second way is to use the geographical or physical features of a place imaginatively as a plot device. Sometimes the journeys that are made by characters in crime fiction serve to remind us as readers of these two major devices. Although historically a lot of Australian crime fiction has not focused on place in terms of setting, this is changing as Australia continues to change. (Author's introduction, 204)
Last amended 10 Oct 2018 11:47:37
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