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Issue Details: First known date: 1992... 1992 South of the West : Postcolonialism and the Narrative Construction of Australia
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Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • Bloomington, Indiana,
      c
      United States of America (USA),
      c
      Americas,
      :
      Indiana University Press ,
      1992 .
      Extent: 257p.
      Description: illus.
      Note/s:
      • Includes bibliographical references and index.
      ISBN: 0253325811

Works about this Work

Walking, Talking, Looking : The Calibre Essay and Remembering Persuasively in Australia Daniel Juckes , 2017 single work criticism
— Appears in: TEXT Special Issue Website Series , no. 39 2017;
'The Calibre Essay Prize has been awarded annually since 2007 by the Australian Book Review. In this paper I argue that a number of the Calibre essays represent a discontinuous, but vital, conversation concerning the interaction between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians. I use the work of Ross Gibson to interpret some of the commended and winning essays. I suggest that the essay form is suited to negotiating difficulties that persist in contemporary Australia as a result of colonial incursion, and argue that the Calibre essays under examination offer possible mechanisms for reconciliation. The form and method of the essay, as well as the finished work itself, help writer and reader to engage with others, with silences, and with the past through concentration of focus, conversation and reciprocity, and the particular flâneur-like qualities of essay writing. I argue that the Calibre essays are examples of what Gibson calls persuasive remembering (2015b: 29).' (Introduction)
Redrawing the Map : An Interdisciplinary Geocritical Approach to Australian Cultural Narratives Peta Mitchell , Jane Stadler , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Geocritical Explorations : Space, Place, and Mapping in Literary and Cultural Studies 2011; (p. 47-62)
Creating Space in Tim Winton's Dirt Music Britta Kuhlenbeck , 2007 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australia : Making Space Meaningful 2007; (p. 55-69)
'I am interested in the questions of how contemporary artists address concepts of space and whether spatial theories developed in geography provide a useful approach to this question. With this work in progress I am following my ongoing interest in merging the academic fields of geography and literature. And in my view, a linking occurs in the notion of 'space' as space is a core concept in both fields. Firstly, I will try to explain why it is worthwhile to think about space followed by an attempt to define the terms space and place. I will propose a certain understanding of space which is best represented by narrative. As an example for my analysis, I have chosen Tim Winton's novel Dirt Music.' (Author's abstract p. 55)
Rock Wallabies and Mayan Temples : The Landscapes of the Pilbara in Japanese Story and the Burrup Penninsula Delys Bird , 2007-2008 single work criticism
— Appears in: Zeitschrift fur Australienstudien , no. 21-22 2007-2008; (p. 21-28)
The Landscape of Variability Stephen Muecke , 2003 single work criticism
— Appears in: Kenyon Review , Summer vol. 25 no. 3/4 2003; (p. 282-300)
'Muecke discusses the cultural representation of the Australian landscape. Australian landscape is the wide brown land of Dorothea McKellar's famous poem gathered and brought into the orbit of perception: framed as a landscape painting or photograph, conceived of as a suitable site for building, or captured as a moving image in the cinema.' (Publisher's abstract)
Untitled Graeme Turner , 1993 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Literary Studies , May vol. 16 no. 1 1993; (p. 121-123)

— Review of Sport in Australian Drama Richard Fotheringham , 1992 single work criticism ; Images of Australia : An Introductory Reader in Australian Studies 1992 anthology ; South of the West : Postcolonialism and the Narrative Construction of Australia Ross Gibson , 1992 single work criticism
Expulsion, Exodus and Exile in White Australian Historical Mythology Ann Curthoys , 1999 single work criticism
— Appears in: Journal of Australian Studies , no. 61 1999; (p. 1-18)
Ann Curthoys examines 'how notions of exile and exodus permeate some key figures in Australian history, the convicts and pioneers' (3). She draws on historical works as well as fiction and film. In the second half of her essay she argues that the Mabo decision has reawakened non-Indigenous Australian's fear of homelessness.
Rock Wallabies and Mayan Temples : The Landscapes of the Pilbara in Japanese Story and the Burrup Penninsula Delys Bird , 2007-2008 single work criticism
— Appears in: Zeitschrift fur Australienstudien , no. 21-22 2007-2008; (p. 21-28)
Creating Space in Tim Winton's Dirt Music Britta Kuhlenbeck , 2007 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australia : Making Space Meaningful 2007; (p. 55-69)
'I am interested in the questions of how contemporary artists address concepts of space and whether spatial theories developed in geography provide a useful approach to this question. With this work in progress I am following my ongoing interest in merging the academic fields of geography and literature. And in my view, a linking occurs in the notion of 'space' as space is a core concept in both fields. Firstly, I will try to explain why it is worthwhile to think about space followed by an attempt to define the terms space and place. I will propose a certain understanding of space which is best represented by narrative. As an example for my analysis, I have chosen Tim Winton's novel Dirt Music.' (Author's abstract p. 55)
The Landscape of Variability Stephen Muecke , 2003 single work criticism
— Appears in: Kenyon Review , Summer vol. 25 no. 3/4 2003; (p. 282-300)
'Muecke discusses the cultural representation of the Australian landscape. Australian landscape is the wide brown land of Dorothea McKellar's famous poem gathered and brought into the orbit of perception: framed as a landscape painting or photograph, conceived of as a suitable site for building, or captured as a moving image in the cinema.' (Publisher's abstract)
Redrawing the Map : An Interdisciplinary Geocritical Approach to Australian Cultural Narratives Peta Mitchell , Jane Stadler , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Geocritical Explorations : Space, Place, and Mapping in Literary and Cultural Studies 2011; (p. 47-62)
Last amended 5 Dec 2002 14:26:25
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