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Capricornia : The Bastard Son single work   criticism  
Issue Details: First known date: 2000... 2000 Capricornia : The Bastard Son
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Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

  • Appears in:
    y separately published work icon Notes & Furphies no. 43 October-November 2000 Z797361 2000 periodical issue 2000 pg. 25-27

Works about this Work

The Materialization and Transformation of Xavier Herbert : A Body of Work Committed to Australia Russell McDougall , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: Engaging with Literature of Commitment : The Worldly Scholar (Volume 2) 2012; (p. 187-200)
‘When the Australian novelist Xavier Herbert applied for a War Service Pension in 1975, the Western Australian authorities were unable to verify his existence. The Deputy Commissioner requested that he supply his birth certificate. ‘Of course I do not have one,’ he responded, ‘have never had one.’ He had been born, he said, at a time and a place when records often were not kept, a frontier space where established social conventions had given way to makeshift. He had been told that he was born on 15 May 1901, and had always operated on that assumption, until now being informed that he had no official existence at all.’ (Author’s introduction 187)
The Materialization and Transformation of Xavier Herbert : A Body of Work Committed to Australia Russell McDougall , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: Engaging with Literature of Commitment : The Worldly Scholar (Volume 2) 2012; (p. 187-200)
‘When the Australian novelist Xavier Herbert applied for a War Service Pension in 1975, the Western Australian authorities were unable to verify his existence. The Deputy Commissioner requested that he supply his birth certificate. ‘Of course I do not have one,’ he responded, ‘have never had one.’ He had been born, he said, at a time and a place when records often were not kept, a frontier space where established social conventions had given way to makeshift. He had been told that he was born on 15 May 1901, and had always operated on that assumption, until now being informed that he had no official existence at all.’ (Author’s introduction 187)
Last amended 15 Oct 2002 12:25:07
25-27 Capricornia : The Bastard Sonsmall AustLit logo Notes & Furphies
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