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y separately published work icon My Sister Jill single work   novel  
Date: 2 Sep 2002
Issue Details: First known date: 2002... 2002 My Sister Jill
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

"'Why is he like this?' Christine wails. 'Remember what he's been through,' says Martha in heavy loaded tones to excuse him. Every war is different, but all wars have casualties. This is a story about a family of damaged survivors, their ongoing inner turmoil, their battles with each other, and their strategies for escape. During the Second World War, Jack is a prisoner on the Changi railway before being shipwrecked on his way to the saltmines. After clinging to wreckage in the shark-infested ocean watching his companions die, he returns home to peace-time. However, although he has survived the war, he has been so shaped and changed by it that not only Martha, his long-suffering wife, but each of their six children are forced to develop survival strategies to cope with him. Jill discovers hers in being top of her class; Johnnie finds refuge in sleep; May designs elegant dresses and dreams of wearing them; the twins have each other; and Christine finds comfort in the wild stallion her imagination has awarded her and Jack's stories of war and heroism. As the world changes and his children start growing up, Jack is left increasingly bewildered and angry. Women's Rights organisations are bad enough, but when Jill joins the anti-Vietnam War movement it feels like the ultimate betrayal. Drastic measures must be taken and nothing will ever be the same again. Patricia Cornelius's evocative debut novel is set in Melbourne between WW2 and the Vietnam War." Source: Publisher.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • Milsons Point, North Sydney - Lane Cove area, Sydney Northern Suburbs, Sydney, New South Wales,: Vintage , 2002 .
      Extent: 217p.
      ISBN: 1740511603

Works about this Work

'All We Are Saying Is Give Peace a Chance' : The Vietnam War Protest Movement in Australian Women’s Fictions by Janine Burke, Patricia Cornelius, Nuri Maas, and Wendy Scarfe Donna Coates , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Journal of the European Association for Studies on Australia , vol. 2 no. 1 2011; (p. 123-141)
'Nearly fifty years ago, the Australian government sent thirty military advisers to South Vietnam, thereby initiating a commitment to a war which was to last for over a decade. Altogether, nearly 47,000 Australians, including 17,500 national servicemen served in Vietnam; 500 died and 2500 were wounded. Almost as disturbing as the results of the battlefield were the shockwaves that reverberated throughout Australian society, for the war years turned out to be one of the most turbulent periods in the nation’s history. The events of these tumultuous years are examined in five little-known Australian women’s fictions—Nuri Maas’s 1971 As Much a Right to Live, Janine Burke’s 1984 Speaking, Wendy Scarfe’s 1984 Neither Here Nor There and her 1988 Laura, My Alter Ego: A Novel of Love, Loyalty and Conscience, and Patricia Cornelius’s 2002 My Sister Jill. Together these texts chronicle the politicization of Australian youth, recount the kinds of overt challenges to the traditional standards of masculinity which had prevailed in Australian society since its inception, and document the emergence of the secondwave feminist movement.' Source: Donna Coates.
The Future of Australian Fiction Ian Syson , 2004 single work review
— Appears in: Overland , Spring no. 176 2004; (p. 94-96)

— Review of I Knit Water Craig Bolland , 2002 single work novel ; A Secret Burial Penelope Sell , 2003 single work novel ; Ninety East Ridge Stephen Reilly , 2002 single work novel ; My Sister Jill Patricia Cornelius , 2002 single work novel
At Home with Poverty Kerryn Goldsworthy , 2002 single work review
— Appears in: The Age , 23 November 2002; (p. 9)

— Review of My Sister Jill Patricia Cornelius , 2002 single work novel
The Future of Australian Fiction Ian Syson , 2004 single work review
— Appears in: Overland , Spring no. 176 2004; (p. 94-96)

— Review of I Knit Water Craig Bolland , 2002 single work novel ; A Secret Burial Penelope Sell , 2003 single work novel ; Ninety East Ridge Stephen Reilly , 2002 single work novel ; My Sister Jill Patricia Cornelius , 2002 single work novel
At Home with Poverty Kerryn Goldsworthy , 2002 single work review
— Appears in: The Age , 23 November 2002; (p. 9)

— Review of My Sister Jill Patricia Cornelius , 2002 single work novel
'All We Are Saying Is Give Peace a Chance' : The Vietnam War Protest Movement in Australian Women’s Fictions by Janine Burke, Patricia Cornelius, Nuri Maas, and Wendy Scarfe Donna Coates , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Journal of the European Association for Studies on Australia , vol. 2 no. 1 2011; (p. 123-141)
'Nearly fifty years ago, the Australian government sent thirty military advisers to South Vietnam, thereby initiating a commitment to a war which was to last for over a decade. Altogether, nearly 47,000 Australians, including 17,500 national servicemen served in Vietnam; 500 died and 2500 were wounded. Almost as disturbing as the results of the battlefield were the shockwaves that reverberated throughout Australian society, for the war years turned out to be one of the most turbulent periods in the nation’s history. The events of these tumultuous years are examined in five little-known Australian women’s fictions—Nuri Maas’s 1971 As Much a Right to Live, Janine Burke’s 1984 Speaking, Wendy Scarfe’s 1984 Neither Here Nor There and her 1988 Laura, My Alter Ego: A Novel of Love, Loyalty and Conscience, and Patricia Cornelius’s 2002 My Sister Jill. Together these texts chronicle the politicization of Australian youth, recount the kinds of overt challenges to the traditional standards of masculinity which had prevailed in Australian society since its inception, and document the emergence of the secondwave feminist movement.' Source: Donna Coates.
Last amended 29 Nov 2016 11:40:40
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