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y separately published work icon Australian Legendary Tales selected work   prose   essay   Indigenous story  
Note: Collected by K. Langloh Parker; selected and edited by H. Drake-Brockman; illustrated by Elizabeth Durack. (t.p.)
Issue Details: First known date: 1953... 1953 Australian Legendary Tales
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Notes

  • A selection made by H. Drake-Brockman from Langloh Parker's Australian Legendary Tales : folk-lore of the Noongahburrahs as told to the piccanninies, Woggheeguy : Australian Aboriginal legends, More Australian Legendary Tales and The Walkabouts of Wur-run-nah.

Contents

* Contents derived from the Sydney, New South Wales,:Angus and Robertson , 1953 version. Please note that other versions/publications may contain different contents. See the Publication Details.
Dinewan the Emu and Goomble-Gubbon the Turkey, single work prose Indigenous story (p. 1-5)
How the Sun was Made, K. Langloh Parker , single work prose Indigenous story (p. 7-8)
The Southern Cross, K. Langloh Parker , single work prose Indigenous story (p. 9-10)
The Beginning of the Narran Lake, K. Langloh Parker , single work prose Indigenous story (p. 12-14)
The Bora of Baiame, K. Langloh Parker , single work prose Indigenous story (p. 15-24)
The Goodoo of Wirreebilla, K. Langloh Parker , single work prose Indigenous story (p. 25-26)
The Finding of the Eleanba Wunda, K. Langloh Parker , single work prose Indigenous story (p. 28-29)
The Baby-Makers, K. Langloh Parker , single work prose Indigenous story (p. 31-34)
The Mopoke and the Moon, K. Langloh Parker , single work prose Indigenous story (p. 35)
The Frog Heralds, K. Langloh Parker , single work prose Indigenous story (p. 36-37)
The Fire-Makers, K. Langloh Parker , single work prose Indigenous story (p. 39-42)
The Iguana and the Black Snake, K. Langloh Parker , single work prose Indigenous story (p. 43-47)
Weedah the Mocking Bird, K. Langloh Parker , single work prose Indigenous story (p. 48-51)
Deegeenboya the Soldier-Bird, K. Langloh Parker , single work prose Indigenous story (p. 52-56)
Mullian-ga the Morning Star, K. Langloh Parker , single work prose Indigenous story (p. 57-58)
Wahn the Crow Wirinun, K. Langloh Parker , single work prose Indigenous story (p. 60-66)
The Rain-Bird, K. Langloh Parker , single work prose Indigenous story (p. 67-69)
The Rain-Maker Wirinun, K. Langloh Parker , single work prose Indigenous story (p. 70-73)
The Dogs of Bahloo, K. Langloh Parker , single work prose Indigenous story (p. 75-76)
A Legend of the Flowers, K. Langloh Parker , single work prose Indigenous story (p. 77-80)

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • Sydney, New South Wales,: Angus and Robertson , 1953 .
      image of person or book cover 8958841206400379103.jpg
      This image has been sourced from online
      Extent: xiv, 237 p.p.
      Description: illus.
      Note/s:
      • Introduction by H. Drake-Brockman, notes on illustrations by Elizabeth Durack.
      • '...a selection made by H. Drake-Brockman from Mrs Langloh-Parker's ... published volumes ... It will appeal equally to the specialist and to the general reader, and children also will find in it a book to love and cherish.' (Dust cover.)
      • Frequently reprinted 1954-1974.
    • New York (City), New York (State),
      c
      United States of America (USA),
      c
      Americas,
      :
      Viking ,
      1966 .
      Extent: 255p.
      Description: illus.
    • London,
      c
      England,
      c
      c
      United Kingdom (UK),
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Bodley Head ,
      1978 .
      Extent: xiv, 237p.
      Description: illus.
Notes:
Some stories from the 1953 edition are omitted.

Other Formats

Works about this Work

Traversing the Unfamiliar : German Translations of Aboriginality in James Vance Marshall’s The Children and Phillip Gwynne’s Deadly Unna? and Nukkin Ya Leah Gerber , 2014 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , vol. 14 no. 1 2014;

'The tendency for Western cultures to emphasise imperial attitudes and experiences in their literature has been described by Edward Said as the primary means by which colonised people assert their identity and the existence of their own history (xii). The tradition of Australian children’s literature, which first grew out of contributions made by European colonisers and largely ignored any indigenous past has been referred to as a “product of colonial history” (Bradford, “Representing Indigeneity” 90) and “a shamelessly racist catalogue of prejudice and misinformation, of superficial clichés, offensive stereotyping and entirely subjective interpretation” (McVitty 7). Historians Robert Hodge and Vijay Mishra use the term Aboriginalism – a variation of Said’s notion of Orientalism – to describe the way in which colonial powers traditionally constructed ideas about the colonised other within patterns of discourse, aptly masking their racist objective and appearing to function constructively (27).

'Focusing on three Australian children’s texts translated into German, this paper examines how the notion of Aboriginality – at different points in time – is presented in the source text and dealt with in translation. While consideration of the purpose – the skopos (Vermeer 1989/2004) – of the translation forming the backbone of contemporary translation theory, the so-called aims of children’s literary translation also cast an important light on the way in which translation strategies are informed. Furthering the international outlook and understanding of young readers remains the most commonly agreed-upon objective of children’s literary translation. In real terms, the execution of this aim often comes down to the decision to foreignise or domesticate. The problem, as translator Anthea Bell writes, is that “one wants readers of the translated text to feel that they are getting the real book, as close as possible to the original”, but which – vitally – includes respecting the foreign aspects of the source text (62). Yet translators of children’s literature (unlike translators of adult literature) have the added challenge of having to negotiate a variety of what Katharina Reiss calls ‘Vermittlerinstanzen’ (intermediaries): parents, teachers, librarians and publishers, who place pressure on the translator (in regards to taboos and pedagogical aspects of the text), so much so that the outcome (i.e. the target text) is affected (7).' (Publication abstract)

The Pleiades and the Dreamtime : An Aboriginal Women's Story and Other Ancient World Traditions Antonella Riem Natale , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: Coolabah , no. 9 2012;
The Genesis and Commodification of Katherine Langloh Parker's Australian Legendary Tales (1896) Judith Johnston , 2005 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , vol. 4 no. 2005; (p. 159-172)
Unsettling Sympathetic Women : Katharine Langloh Parker and Catherine Martin's An Australian Girl Tanya Dalziell , 2004 single work criticism
— Appears in: Settler Romances and the Australian Girl 2004; (p. 74-105, notes 149-156)
Australia's Best-known Folkloric Text and Its Several Fates J. S. Ryan , 2001 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Folklore , October no. 16 2001; (p. 146-163)
Discusses the various editions and versions of K. L. Parker's Australian Legendary Tales, including a forthcoming new edition of the collections.
Australia's Best-known Folkloric Text and Its Several Fates J. S. Ryan , 2001 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Folklore , October no. 16 2001; (p. 146-163)
Discusses the various editions and versions of K. L. Parker's Australian Legendary Tales, including a forthcoming new edition of the collections.
Unsettling Sympathetic Women : Katharine Langloh Parker and Catherine Martin's An Australian Girl Tanya Dalziell , 2004 single work criticism
— Appears in: Settler Romances and the Australian Girl 2004; (p. 74-105, notes 149-156)
The Genesis and Commodification of Katherine Langloh Parker's Australian Legendary Tales (1896) Judith Johnston , 2005 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , vol. 4 no. 2005; (p. 159-172)
The Pleiades and the Dreamtime : An Aboriginal Women's Story and Other Ancient World Traditions Antonella Riem Natale , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: Coolabah , no. 9 2012;
Traversing the Unfamiliar : German Translations of Aboriginality in James Vance Marshall’s The Children and Phillip Gwynne’s Deadly Unna? and Nukkin Ya Leah Gerber , 2014 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , vol. 14 no. 1 2014;

'The tendency for Western cultures to emphasise imperial attitudes and experiences in their literature has been described by Edward Said as the primary means by which colonised people assert their identity and the existence of their own history (xii). The tradition of Australian children’s literature, which first grew out of contributions made by European colonisers and largely ignored any indigenous past has been referred to as a “product of colonial history” (Bradford, “Representing Indigeneity” 90) and “a shamelessly racist catalogue of prejudice and misinformation, of superficial clichés, offensive stereotyping and entirely subjective interpretation” (McVitty 7). Historians Robert Hodge and Vijay Mishra use the term Aboriginalism – a variation of Said’s notion of Orientalism – to describe the way in which colonial powers traditionally constructed ideas about the colonised other within patterns of discourse, aptly masking their racist objective and appearing to function constructively (27).

'Focusing on three Australian children’s texts translated into German, this paper examines how the notion of Aboriginality – at different points in time – is presented in the source text and dealt with in translation. While consideration of the purpose – the skopos (Vermeer 1989/2004) – of the translation forming the backbone of contemporary translation theory, the so-called aims of children’s literary translation also cast an important light on the way in which translation strategies are informed. Furthering the international outlook and understanding of young readers remains the most commonly agreed-upon objective of children’s literary translation. In real terms, the execution of this aim often comes down to the decision to foreignise or domesticate. The problem, as translator Anthea Bell writes, is that “one wants readers of the translated text to feel that they are getting the real book, as close as possible to the original”, but which – vitally – includes respecting the foreign aspects of the source text (62). Yet translators of children’s literature (unlike translators of adult literature) have the added challenge of having to negotiate a variety of what Katharina Reiss calls ‘Vermittlerinstanzen’ (intermediaries): parents, teachers, librarians and publishers, who place pressure on the translator (in regards to taboos and pedagogical aspects of the text), so much so that the outcome (i.e. the target text) is affected (7).' (Publication abstract)

Last amended 31 May 2017 17:48:14
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