AustLit logo
y separately published work icon Blinky Bill Grows Up single work   children's fiction   children's  
Issue Details: First known date: 1934... 1934 Blinky Bill Grows Up
The material on this page is available to AustLit subscribers. If you are a subscriber or are from a subscribing organisation, please log in to gain full access. To explore options for subscribing to this unique teaching, research, and publishing resource for Australian culture and storytelling, please contact us or find out more.

Notes

  • Other formats: Also sound recording.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Alternative title: Blinky Bill Grows Up : Further Adventures of the Quaint Little Australian

Works about this Work

Tales for Children single work review
— Review of Blinky Bill Grows Up Dorothy Wall , 1934 single work children's fiction
Presents for Kiddies single work review
— Review of Blinky Bill Grows Up Dorothy Wall , 1934 single work children's fiction
Anecdote and Anthropomorphism : Writing the Australian Pied Butcherbird Hollis Taylor , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australasian Journal of Ecocriticism and Cultural Ecology , Summer vol. 1 no. 2011;
This paper surveys textual references to the Australian pied butcherbird (Cracticus nigrogularis). We begin with my initial encounter with this songbird (in re-worked excerpts from the book Post Impressions), and then expand our review to aboriginal stories, historic ornithological reports and field guides, informal stories, archival Australian periodicals, children’s literature, literary references, and composers’ texts. Many of these reveal the tension between the superlative pied butcherbird vocal abilities and their ferocious hunting prowess. The paper shuns neither anecdote nor anthropomorphism as it attempts a new mode of interspecies narrative. I argue that anecdotes can contribute to an understanding of this understudied songbird. In inventorying pied butcherbird textual references, we find that our stories about them are ultimately stories about us as well—anthropomorphism seems to be an innate human proclivity. Reflecting on the lives of animals is of psychological, intellectual, and metaphysical significance for humans.
A Reader's Notebook Nettie Palmer , 1934 single work review
— Appears in: All About Books , 3 December vol. 6 no. 12 1934; (p. 241)

— Review of One Hundred Years : The Romance of the Victorian People Roy Bridges , 1934 single work prose
Untitled 1934 single work review
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 17 November 1934; (p. 12)

— Review of Blinky Bill Grows Up Dorothy Wall , 1934 single work children's fiction
A Book for Children 1934 single work review
— Appears in: Narromine News and Trangie Advocate , 9 November 1934;

— Review of Blinky Bill Grows Up Dorothy Wall , 1934 single work children's fiction
A Real Australian 1934 single work review
— Appears in: The Newcastle Sun , 20 October 1934;

— Review of Blinky Bill Grows Up Dorothy Wall , 1934 single work children's fiction
An Australian Fable 1934 single work review
— Appears in: Yass Tribune-Courier , 1 November 1934;

— Review of Blinky Bill Grows Up Dorothy Wall , 1934 single work children's fiction
Books for Children 1934 single work review
— Appears in: The Clifton Courier , 3 November 1934;

— Review of Blinky Bill Grows Up Dorothy Wall , 1934 single work children's fiction
For the Little Ones 1934 single work review
— Appears in: Catholic Press , 1 November 1934;

— Review of Blinky Bill Grows Up Dorothy Wall , 1934 single work children's fiction
A Reader's Notebook Nettie Palmer , 1934 single work review
— Appears in: All About Books , 3 December vol. 6 no. 12 1934; (p. 241)

— Review of One Hundred Years : The Romance of the Victorian People Roy Bridges , 1934 single work prose
Anecdote and Anthropomorphism : Writing the Australian Pied Butcherbird Hollis Taylor , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australasian Journal of Ecocriticism and Cultural Ecology , Summer vol. 1 no. 2011;
This paper surveys textual references to the Australian pied butcherbird (Cracticus nigrogularis). We begin with my initial encounter with this songbird (in re-worked excerpts from the book Post Impressions), and then expand our review to aboriginal stories, historic ornithological reports and field guides, informal stories, archival Australian periodicals, children’s literature, literary references, and composers’ texts. Many of these reveal the tension between the superlative pied butcherbird vocal abilities and their ferocious hunting prowess. The paper shuns neither anecdote nor anthropomorphism as it attempts a new mode of interspecies narrative. I argue that anecdotes can contribute to an understanding of this understudied songbird. In inventorying pied butcherbird textual references, we find that our stories about them are ultimately stories about us as well—anthropomorphism seems to be an innate human proclivity. Reflecting on the lives of animals is of psychological, intellectual, and metaphysical significance for humans.
Last amended 24 Jun 2008 18:41:23
Settings:
  • c
    Australia,
    c
Newspapers:
    Powered by Trove
    X