AustLit logo
person or book cover
Courtesy of Magabala Books.
y separately published work icon Enora and the Black Crane single work   picture book   children's  
Issue Details: First known date: 1991... 1991 Enora and the Black Crane
The material on this page is available to AustLit subscribers. If you are a subscriber or are from a subscribing organisation, please log in to gain full access. To explore options for subscribing to this unique teaching, research, and publishing resource for Australian culture and storytelling, please contact us or find out more.

AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'How birds get their colours and how Enora became the black crane.' (Libraries Australia record).

Notes

  • Other formats: Also braille and sound recording.

Affiliation Notes

  • This work is affiliated with the AustLit subset Asian-Australian Children's Literature and Publishing because it has Japanese and Chinese translations.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • Sydney, New South Wales,: Scholastic Australia , 1991 .
      Extent: [32]p.
      Description: col. illus.
      Reprinted: 1992
      ISBN: 0868966436, 0868968692 (big book), 0868966444 (pbk)
    • New York (City), New York (State),
      c
      United States of America (USA),
      c
      Americas,
      :
      Scholastic Press ,
      1993 .
      Extent: 1 v.p.
      Description: col. illus.
      ISBN: 0590463756
    • Broome, Kimberley area, North Western Australia, Western Australia,: Magabala Books , 2009 .
      person or book cover
      Courtesy of Magabala Books.
      Extent: 1 v.p.
      Edition info: New ed.
      ISBN: 9781921248023 (pbk.)
Alternative title: Ainuola he Hei He
Language: Chinese

Works about this Work

Spreading the Seeds : Australian Indigenous Publishing for Young People Robyn Sheahan-Bright , 2009 single work essay
— Appears in: Magpies : Talking About Books for Children , May vol. 24 no. 2 2009; (p. 8-12)

Sheahan-Bright explores '...the growth in publishing by Indigenous writers and publishers, and of writing on Indigenous cultural themes, and some of the issues which confront publishers when dealing with Indigenous writers and illustrators' (8). The article begins with some background, and points out that despite a cultural and artistic heritage that dates back thousands of years, Indigenous writing and publishing has not been widely recognised in mainstream Australian until most recently and Sheahan-Bright says "This is despite their having been engaged in colonial conflict and later subject to the...assimilation policies which discouraged involvement with European notions of literacy" (8). She discusses the origins of the Indigenous publishing houses Aboriginal Studies Press (ASP), Institute of Aboriginal Development (IAD Press), Magabala Books, Keeaira Press, Black Ink Press, Indij Readers and briefly refers to the above mentioned texts in the section entitled 'what's being published'. This leads into a summary of the five main issues in relation to Indigenous publishing and the 'need for authenticity in writing about Indigenous peoples and culture' (11). Sheahan-Bright lists these issues as 'respect for country and Indigenous control of material', relevance of copyright issues, lack of understanding from non-Indigenous Australians, the need to consider 'protocol, specific authority, appropriation' and finally, to develop an awareness of the social factors that contribute to the socially and economically disadvantaged position of the majority of Indigenous Australians. She argues that 'knowledge of Indigenous culture is a genuine part of Australian culture ...and the publishing output should reflect that' (12). However, she concludes that while 'there has been growth in publishing Indigenous voices in English', in general, 'there are many miles still to be travelled and many seeds still to be sown' (12)

[Untitled] Rayma Turton , 2009 single work review
— Appears in: Magpies : Talking About Books for Children , March vol. 24 no. 1 2009; (p. 29)

— Review of Enora and the Black Crane Raymond Meeks , 1991 single work picture book
The pouquoi story of how birds got there colors has been re-released by Magabala Books (Broome, Western Australia) with some slight changes to the text and illustrations as well as an updated design layout.
Enora Flies Again Christine Howes , 2009 single work review
— Appears in: Koori Mail , 25 February no. 445 2009; (p. 52)

— Review of Enora and the Black Crane Raymond Meeks , 1991 single work picture book
Untitled John Murray , 1992 single work review
— Appears in: Magpies : Talking About Books for Children , May vol. 7 no. 2 1992; (p. 28)

— Review of Enora and the Black Crane Raymond Meeks , 1991 single work picture book
Untitled Eleanor Stodart , 1992 single work review
— Appears in: Reading Time : The Journal of the Children's Book Council of Australia , vol. 36 no. 1 1992; (p. 18)

— Review of Enora and the Black Crane Raymond Meeks , 1991 single work picture book
Untitled Eleanor Stodart , 1992 single work review
— Appears in: Reading Time : The Journal of the Children's Book Council of Australia , vol. 36 no. 1 1992; (p. 18)

— Review of Enora and the Black Crane Raymond Meeks , 1991 single work picture book
Untitled John Murray , 1992 single work review
— Appears in: Magpies : Talking About Books for Children , May vol. 7 no. 2 1992; (p. 28)

— Review of Enora and the Black Crane Raymond Meeks , 1991 single work picture book
Enora Flies Again Christine Howes , 2009 single work review
— Appears in: Koori Mail , 25 February no. 445 2009; (p. 52)

— Review of Enora and the Black Crane Raymond Meeks , 1991 single work picture book
[Untitled] Rayma Turton , 2009 single work review
— Appears in: Magpies : Talking About Books for Children , March vol. 24 no. 1 2009; (p. 29)

— Review of Enora and the Black Crane Raymond Meeks , 1991 single work picture book
The pouquoi story of how birds got there colors has been re-released by Magabala Books (Broome, Western Australia) with some slight changes to the text and illustrations as well as an updated design layout.
Wright Scores High Popularity Robert Hefner , 1992 single work column
— Appears in: The Canberra Times , 5 July 1992; (p. 23)

— Review of Enora and the Black Crane Raymond Meeks , 1991 single work picture book
Spreading the Seeds : Australian Indigenous Publishing for Young People Robyn Sheahan-Bright , 2009 single work essay
— Appears in: Magpies : Talking About Books for Children , May vol. 24 no. 2 2009; (p. 8-12)

Sheahan-Bright explores '...the growth in publishing by Indigenous writers and publishers, and of writing on Indigenous cultural themes, and some of the issues which confront publishers when dealing with Indigenous writers and illustrators' (8). The article begins with some background, and points out that despite a cultural and artistic heritage that dates back thousands of years, Indigenous writing and publishing has not been widely recognised in mainstream Australian until most recently and Sheahan-Bright says "This is despite their having been engaged in colonial conflict and later subject to the...assimilation policies which discouraged involvement with European notions of literacy" (8). She discusses the origins of the Indigenous publishing houses Aboriginal Studies Press (ASP), Institute of Aboriginal Development (IAD Press), Magabala Books, Keeaira Press, Black Ink Press, Indij Readers and briefly refers to the above mentioned texts in the section entitled 'what's being published'. This leads into a summary of the five main issues in relation to Indigenous publishing and the 'need for authenticity in writing about Indigenous peoples and culture' (11). Sheahan-Bright lists these issues as 'respect for country and Indigenous control of material', relevance of copyright issues, lack of understanding from non-Indigenous Australians, the need to consider 'protocol, specific authority, appropriation' and finally, to develop an awareness of the social factors that contribute to the socially and economically disadvantaged position of the majority of Indigenous Australians. She argues that 'knowledge of Indigenous culture is a genuine part of Australian culture ...and the publishing output should reflect that' (12). However, she concludes that while 'there has been growth in publishing Indigenous voices in English', in general, 'there are many miles still to be travelled and many seeds still to be sown' (12)

Last amended 24 Sep 2013 11:40:10
X