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y separately published work icon Golden fiddles single work   children's fiction   children's  
Issue Details: First known date: 1928... 1928 Golden fiddles
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Contents

* Contents derived from the Melbourne, Victoria,:Ward, Lock , 1928 version. Please note that other versions/publications may contain different contents. See the Publication Details.
The One Great Day (from Golden Fiddles), Mary Grant Bruce , extract (p. 31-33)

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Works about this Work

y separately published work icon From Colonial to Modern: Transnational Girlhood in Canadian, Australian, and New Zealand Children's Literature, 1840-1940 Michelle J. Smith , Kristine Moruzi , Clare Bradford , Toronto : University of Toronto Press , 2018 15039944 2018 multi chapter work criticism

'Through a comparison of Canadian, Australian, and New Zealand texts published between 1840 and 1940, From Colonial to Modern develops a new history of colonial girlhoods revealing how girlhood in each of these emerging nations reflects a unique political, social, and cultural context.

'Print culture was central to the definition, and redefinition, of colonial girlhood during this period of rapid change. Models of girlhood are shared between settler colonies and contain many similar attitudes towards family, the natural world, education, employment, modernity, and race, yet, as the authors argue, these texts also reveal different attitudes that emerged out of distinct colonial experiences. Unlike the imperial model representing the British ideal, the transnational girl is an adaptation of British imperial femininity and holds, for example, a unique perception of Indigenous culture and imperialism. Drawing on fiction, girls’ magazines, and school magazine, the authors shine a light on neglected corners of the literary histories of these three nations and strengthen our knowledge of femininity in white settler colonies.'  (Publication summary)

Some Australian Gift Books for Young People 1928 single work review
— Appears in: All About Books , 14 December vol. 1 no. 1 1928; (p. 5)

— Review of Judy and Punch Ethel Turner , 1928 single work children's fiction ; Golden fiddles Mary Grant Bruce , 1928 single work children's fiction ; The Wild Oats of Han Katharine Susannah Prichard , 1926 single work novel ; Ann Chooses Glory Lilian Turner , 1928 single work novel ; The Treasure of the Tropics Bernard Cronin , 1927 single work children's fiction
Some Australian Gift Books for Young People 1928 single work review
— Appears in: All About Books , 14 December vol. 1 no. 1 1928; (p. 5)

— Review of Judy and Punch Ethel Turner , 1928 single work children's fiction ; Golden fiddles Mary Grant Bruce , 1928 single work children's fiction ; The Wild Oats of Han Katharine Susannah Prichard , 1926 single work novel ; Ann Chooses Glory Lilian Turner , 1928 single work novel ; The Treasure of the Tropics Bernard Cronin , 1927 single work children's fiction
y separately published work icon From Colonial to Modern: Transnational Girlhood in Canadian, Australian, and New Zealand Children's Literature, 1840-1940 Michelle J. Smith , Kristine Moruzi , Clare Bradford , Toronto : University of Toronto Press , 2018 15039944 2018 multi chapter work criticism

'Through a comparison of Canadian, Australian, and New Zealand texts published between 1840 and 1940, From Colonial to Modern develops a new history of colonial girlhoods revealing how girlhood in each of these emerging nations reflects a unique political, social, and cultural context.

'Print culture was central to the definition, and redefinition, of colonial girlhood during this period of rapid change. Models of girlhood are shared between settler colonies and contain many similar attitudes towards family, the natural world, education, employment, modernity, and race, yet, as the authors argue, these texts also reveal different attitudes that emerged out of distinct colonial experiences. Unlike the imperial model representing the British ideal, the transnational girl is an adaptation of British imperial femininity and holds, for example, a unique perception of Indigenous culture and imperialism. Drawing on fiction, girls’ magazines, and school magazine, the authors shine a light on neglected corners of the literary histories of these three nations and strengthen our knowledge of femininity in white settler colonies.'  (Publication summary)

Last amended 27 Mar 2001 10:05:26
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