y The Axis Trilogy series - author   novel   fantasy  
First known date: 1995-1996 Issue Details: First known date: 1995-1996... 1995-1996 The Axis Trilogy
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Notes

  • The Axis Trilogy is set in the same world as Douglass's subsequent series, the Darkglass Mountains trilogy.
  • Douglass published the Tencendor Glossary on her website: "an updated and extended version of the glossary that exists in the back of the Axis books. If you don't want to know what happens by the end of Book III, StarMan, then don't read this."
  • Russian title: Battle Axe; German title: Zyklus Unter dem Weltenbaum; Czech title: Poutnikuv navrat; U.S.title: The Wayfarer Redemption; French title: Trilogie d'Axis.

Includes

1
y Battleaxe Sara Douglass , Pymble : HarperCollins , 1995 Z160666 1995 single work novel fantasy A thousand years ago the Acharites drove the Forbidden from their land. Now strange sightings along Achar's northern border foreshadow their return. The barbaric tribes of the Ravensbund are pouring south with tales of fearsome beings who feed on the terror of their prey. Axis, bastard son of the dead Princess Rivkah, is sent to the battlefront of Gorkenfort with his elite Axe-Wielders. Once there, he must hand over command to his hated half-brother, Borneheld. But travelling north, Axis falls in love with Faraday - Borneheld's bethrothed, and meets two priests who challenge the very essence of his beliefs. The Sentinels walk the land, the TreeFriend has been found, and the people of the Plough, the Wing and the Horn must set aside their differences and unite under one leader against the evil rising in the North.... (Publisher's website)
2
y Enchanter Sara Douglass , Pymble : HarperCollins , 1996 Z266546 1996 single work novel science fiction 'Axis is a true hero, in every sense of the word. On his shoulders lies the double burden of prophecy and war. Having fulfilled the first part of the prophecy by becoming the StarMan, he now must reunite the three races inhabiting his world. It is his destiny to lead an army against his evil half-brother, to regain control of Tencendor, once the greatest land in the world. It is his destiny to be caught between the two women he loves, one the epitome of gentility, beauty, and intelligence, the other a fierce warrior with a cunning wit. And it is his destiny to be thwarted at every turn by the vicious Goragel, an insane monster bent on destroying all that Axis works to preserve . . . Sara Douglass has taken America by storm with this powerful tale of love, prophecy, battles, and revenge.' (Library of Congress publisher description, Tor, 2001 imprint)
3
y Starman Sara Douglass , Pymble : HarperCollins , 1996 Z61529 1996 single work novel science fiction 'Assuming his role as the Starman of the Prophecy of the Destroyer, the warrior-wizard Axis makes his way to his final confrontation with his corrupt half-brother, Gorgrael. Meanwhile, Azhure, Axis's wife, discovers her own powers as an Enchantress and learns the twin strengths of love and friendship.' Source: bookseller's website.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • Pymble, Turramurra - Pymble - St Ives area, Sydney Northern Suburbs, Sydney,: HarperCollins , 1995-1996 .

Works about this Work

Race, Reconciliation and National Identity in Australian Genre Fantasy of the 1990s Hilary Donraadt , 2016 single work criticism
— Appears in: Science Fiction : A Review of Speculative Fiction , vol. 18 no. 2 2016; (p. 40-72)

'Representations of race in Australian fiction are often influences by and speak to Australia's colonial history and contemporary social tensions around issues of race. The genre of epic medievalist fantasy is no exception and indeed the healing of racial tensions surrounding a colonial past is frequently a prominent theme of Australian fantasy novels, As government policies and public opinions continually develop and change regarding matters of how to best address our colonial past and how Australia's population of indigenous people should be treated, the sociopolitical climate reflected in Australian fiction likewise alters. As it is beyond the scope of this work to examine the various shifts in thought over time, I have chosen to focus on fantasy fiction produced from the mid 1990s to the early 2000s. I will deal primarily with Sara Douglass' Axis Trilogy, published between 1995-1996, and Kate Forsyth's six book series The Witches of Eileanan, published between 1997 and 2002.' (Introduction)

Eco/Feminism and History in Fantasy Writing by Women Helene Bowen Raddeker , 2009 single work criticism
— Appears in: Outskirts : Feminisms along the Edge , November vol. 21 no. 2009;
'A childhood pastime I've not yet outgrown is reading Fantasy and Science Fiction. These days, however, my interest especially in Fantasy is not unconnected with scholarship, both History and Feminist Studies. In this essay I reflect on ways in which women's Fantasy has been inspired by feminist ideas, with particular emphasis on 'spiritual ecofeminism' and feminist history. I approach this as a world gender historian and historian of feminism, rather than a Science Fiction/Fantasy critic. As such, this essay is alert to dis/continuities and junctures in recent Fantasy that explicitly deals with history and appears to be influenced by ecofeminism. To illustrate such influences, I draw upon selective examples from some leading American Fantasy and Science Fiction authors—Andre Norton, Marion Zimmer Bradley, Sheri Tepper and the like—while also referring to some Australian fantasists popular since the 1990s. Of particular interest to me is Sara Douglass, who was formerly an academic historian, especially her Axis Trilogy (1995-96) and its sequel, The Wayfarer Redemption trilogy (1997 to 1999).' (Source: Author's introduction)
An Eidolon Interview with Louise Thurtell Steven Paulsen (interviewer), 1996 single work interview
— Appears in: Eidolon : The Journal of Australian Science Fiction and Fantasy , Autumn no. 21 1996; (p. 36-41)
Louise Thurtell discusses the publishing processes involved with works by Australian writers of science, speculative and fantasy fiction.
An Eidolon Interview with Louise Thurtell Steven Paulsen (interviewer), 1996 single work interview
— Appears in: Eidolon : The Journal of Australian Science Fiction and Fantasy , Autumn no. 21 1996; (p. 36-41)
Louise Thurtell discusses the publishing processes involved with works by Australian writers of science, speculative and fantasy fiction.
Eco/Feminism and History in Fantasy Writing by Women Helene Bowen Raddeker , 2009 single work criticism
— Appears in: Outskirts : Feminisms along the Edge , November vol. 21 no. 2009;
'A childhood pastime I've not yet outgrown is reading Fantasy and Science Fiction. These days, however, my interest especially in Fantasy is not unconnected with scholarship, both History and Feminist Studies. In this essay I reflect on ways in which women's Fantasy has been inspired by feminist ideas, with particular emphasis on 'spiritual ecofeminism' and feminist history. I approach this as a world gender historian and historian of feminism, rather than a Science Fiction/Fantasy critic. As such, this essay is alert to dis/continuities and junctures in recent Fantasy that explicitly deals with history and appears to be influenced by ecofeminism. To illustrate such influences, I draw upon selective examples from some leading American Fantasy and Science Fiction authors—Andre Norton, Marion Zimmer Bradley, Sheri Tepper and the like—while also referring to some Australian fantasists popular since the 1990s. Of particular interest to me is Sara Douglass, who was formerly an academic historian, especially her Axis Trilogy (1995-96) and its sequel, The Wayfarer Redemption trilogy (1997 to 1999).' (Source: Author's introduction)
Race, Reconciliation and National Identity in Australian Genre Fantasy of the 1990s Hilary Donraadt , 2016 single work criticism
— Appears in: Science Fiction : A Review of Speculative Fiction , vol. 18 no. 2 2016; (p. 40-72)

'Representations of race in Australian fiction are often influences by and speak to Australia's colonial history and contemporary social tensions around issues of race. The genre of epic medievalist fantasy is no exception and indeed the healing of racial tensions surrounding a colonial past is frequently a prominent theme of Australian fantasy novels, As government policies and public opinions continually develop and change regarding matters of how to best address our colonial past and how Australia's population of indigenous people should be treated, the sociopolitical climate reflected in Australian fiction likewise alters. As it is beyond the scope of this work to examine the various shifts in thought over time, I have chosen to focus on fantasy fiction produced from the mid 1990s to the early 2000s. I will deal primarily with Sara Douglass' Axis Trilogy, published between 1995-1996, and Kate Forsyth's six book series The Witches of Eileanan, published between 1997 and 2002.' (Introduction)

Awards

1996 joint winner Aurealis Awards for Excellence in Australian Speculative Fiction Fantasy Division Best Novel The award was made to 2 parts of the trilogy: Enchanter and Starman.
Last amended 26 Sep 2017 13:51:09
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