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Issue Details: First known date: 1961... 1961 Poetry Magazine
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

Established in 1961, Poetry Magazine superseded Prism, the previous periodical of the Poetry Society of Australia.

It was edited by Roland Robinson, Grace Perry and others in the first twelve months; Perry became editor in 1962, continuing until 1964. In that year, a special issue that contained the untranslated works of foreign authors drew strong criticism from other members of the Poetry Society. Because of the conflict, Perry left to establish her own magazine, Poetry Australia, pursuing her goals of an international magazine. Robinson, after a short absence from the society, returned as President and primary editor of the magazine in 1965, ensuring that Poetry Magazine retained a strong Australian focus.

Robinson's policies were challenged in 1968 when Robert Adamson joined the editorial committee, bringing his strong appreciation of American writers and non-traditional poetics. In 1969, Adamson's 'Young Poets' special issue introduced many new 'modern' poets to Poetry Magazine, challenging the poetry 'establishment' of writers such as A. D. Hope and James McAuley. After a special meeting of the Poetry Society was called to 'discipline' Adamson, the newer members asserted their voting power over the older generation. Subsequently, Adamson, Greg Curtois and Carl Harrison-Ford were elected to prominent positions in the Poetry Society. Robinson, unable to assert his more traditional editorial policies, resigned in protest.

Poetry Magazine gradually evolved into a periodical that favoured modern poetics. In February 1971 Poetry Magazine was renamed New Poetry, signalling a clean break from the more traditional verse Robinson had fostered in the 1960s. New Poetry became a significant supporter of poets who are generally grouped under the banner of New Australian Poetry.

Notes

  • RANGE: Vol. 9, no. 1 July 1961 - Vol. 18, no. 6 Dec. 1970 - Became New Poetry with Vol. 19, no. 1 Feb. 1971
  • FREQUENCY: bi-monthly
  • SIZE: 22cm
  • PRICE: three shillings (1961-1962); 5 shillings/fifty cents (1962-1968); seventy five cents (1969-1970)

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

First known date: 1961

Works about this Work

Pam Brown’s Sydney Poetry in the 70s : In Conversation with Corey Wakeling Corey Wakeling (interviewer), 2012 single work interview
— Appears in: Cordite Poetry Review , 1 May vol. 38 no. 0 2012;
'Pam Brown is not only one of Australia's most prolific and important poets writing today, but also one of our richest archives on the history of late twentieth century Australian poetry. Since this is Cordite's Sydney issue, I thought an interview with her might evince a valuably multifarious image of, perhaps, Australia's most speedily shifting poetic landscape. In particular, as a contemporary Australian poetic history of the late twentieth century stems in part from poets closely associated with the city, it only made sense to ask Pam Brown, Sydney avant-garde collaborator, instigator, publisher and poet. Author of 16 books and 10 chapbooks, Brown has lived most of her life in Sydney, and now lives with her partner in the suburb of Alexandria. As well as offer new understandings of a period thoroughly historicised, I hoped Brown's personal recollections of the formative 1970s would illuminate the significance of those small press and handmade initiatives of the past that Astrid Lorange sees as 'non-causal' and 'monadic' in her Jacket2 archival commentary. Naturally, I was not disappointed.' (Author's introduction)
Poetry in a Shrinking World Craig Powell , 2003 single work criticism
— Appears in: Five Bells , Winter vol. 10 no. 3 2003; (p. 9-11)
Powell traces some of the history of the Poetry Society of Australia and Grace Perry's falling out with the organisation, leading to the establishment of Poetry Australia. He also mentions the separate publication, Poetry Magazine, that was published under the auspices of the Poetry Society. Powell relates his own involvement with these journals and comments on his dual career as poet and psychoanalyst.
From Rhetoric to Eloquence : The Generation of '68 John McLaren , 1996 single work criticism
— Appears in: Writing in Hope and Fear : Literature as Politics in Postwar Australia 1996; (p. 178-200)
The Poet and the Public Ronald T. Dunlop , 1967 single work
— Appears in: Poetry Magazine , no. 3 1967; (p. 3-6)
Review of no.3 Bruce Nesbitt , 1966 single work review
— Appears in: The Australian , 23 April 1966; (p. 8)

— Review of Poetry Magazine 1961 periodical (102 issues)
Review of no.1 John Bray , 1963 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , December vol. 3 no. 2 1963; (p. 44)

— Review of Poetry Magazine 1961 periodical (102 issues)
Review of no.1-4 P.D.S. , 1965 single work review
— Appears in: Twentieth Century , (1965-1966) vol. 20 no. 1965; (p. 373-374)

— Review of Poetry Magazine 1961 periodical (102 issues)
Review of no.3 Bruce Nesbitt , 1966 single work review
— Appears in: The Australian , 23 April 1966; (p. 8)

— Review of Poetry Magazine 1961 periodical (102 issues)
Poetry in a Shrinking World Craig Powell , 2003 single work criticism
— Appears in: Five Bells , Winter vol. 10 no. 3 2003; (p. 9-11)
Powell traces some of the history of the Poetry Society of Australia and Grace Perry's falling out with the organisation, leading to the establishment of Poetry Australia. He also mentions the separate publication, Poetry Magazine, that was published under the auspices of the Poetry Society. Powell relates his own involvement with these journals and comments on his dual career as poet and psychoanalyst.
Pam Brown’s Sydney Poetry in the 70s : In Conversation with Corey Wakeling Corey Wakeling (interviewer), 2012 single work interview
— Appears in: Cordite Poetry Review , 1 May vol. 38 no. 0 2012;
'Pam Brown is not only one of Australia's most prolific and important poets writing today, but also one of our richest archives on the history of late twentieth century Australian poetry. Since this is Cordite's Sydney issue, I thought an interview with her might evince a valuably multifarious image of, perhaps, Australia's most speedily shifting poetic landscape. In particular, as a contemporary Australian poetic history of the late twentieth century stems in part from poets closely associated with the city, it only made sense to ask Pam Brown, Sydney avant-garde collaborator, instigator, publisher and poet. Author of 16 books and 10 chapbooks, Brown has lived most of her life in Sydney, and now lives with her partner in the suburb of Alexandria. As well as offer new understandings of a period thoroughly historicised, I hoped Brown's personal recollections of the formative 1970s would illuminate the significance of those small press and handmade initiatives of the past that Astrid Lorange sees as 'non-causal' and 'monadic' in her Jacket2 archival commentary. Naturally, I was not disappointed.' (Author's introduction)
The Poet and the Public Ronald T. Dunlop , 1967 single work
— Appears in: Poetry Magazine , no. 3 1967; (p. 3-6)
[Untitled] [Southerly, vol.22 no.4 1962] Duncan Miller , 1962 single work correspondence
— Appears in: Southerly , vol. 22 no. 4 1962; (p. 258)
What Are Poets For? Eric Rolls , 1965 single work
— Appears in: Poetry Magazine , no. 4 1965; (p. 3-8)
Last amended 3 Aug 2007 17:41:42
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