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y separately published work icon The Other Side of the Family single work   novel   young adult  
Issue Details: First known date: 1986... 1986 The Other Side of the Family
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Notes

  • Dedication: For my daughters Alison and Bridget
  • Other formats: Also braille, sound recording.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • New York (City), New York (State),
      c
      United States of America (USA),
      c
      Americas,
      :
      Henry Holt ,
      1988 .
      Extent: 167p.
      Note/s:
      • This edition won the School Library Journal USA Best Book of the Year (1988).
      ISBN: 080500758X
    • London,
      c
      England,
      c
      c
      United Kingdom (UK),
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Orchard Books ,
      1989 .
      Extent: 160p.
      ISBN: 185213173x, 1852131446
Alternative title: Skjulte rødder
Language: Danish
    • Aarhus,
      c
      Denmark,
      c
      Scandinavia, Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Modtryk ,
      1993 .
      Extent: 176p.
      ISBN: 8773943177

Works about this Work

Maureen Pople : 'The Other Side of the Family' Bernadette Welch , 1995 single work review
— Appears in: Viewpoint : On Books for Young Adults , Autumn vol. 3 no. 1 1995; (p. 27)

— Review of The Other Side of the Family Maureen Pople , 1986 single work novel
Attitudes to War in Australian Children's Literature Anne M. O'Sullivan , 1994 single work criticism
— Appears in: Papers : Explorations into Children's Literature , April vol. 5 no. 1 1994; (p. 34-48)
O'Sullivan seeks to 'identify attitudes to war in Australian children's literature' in the period 1914-1994, noting in particular the movement from identification with Britain and the Empire in the early decades of this period to an affinity with Asia and the Pacific in the latter decades (34). The discussion begins with a literature review of Australian and overseas critical research in this field and then surveys a large number of (mainly Australian) novels with war as the central/pivotal theme. O'Sullivan concludes that there has been a change in attitudes to war in Australian children's literature, whereby 'once Australia was part of the British Empire and prepared to fight for that anywhere in the world, now multicultural Australia takes a broader view and sees herself as part of a global family' (47).
Advocating Multiculturalism: Migrants in Australian Children's Literature After 1972 John Stephens , 1990 single work criticism
— Appears in: Children's Literature Association Quarterly , vol. 15 no. 4 1990; (p. 180-188)
This article is concerned with a major shift in Australian ideology and values that Stephens argues occurred during the 1970s. He argues that 'within a decade during the 1970s Australian political and educational institutions underwent a palpable shift towards an ideology of multiculturalism and Australian Children's Literature shifted with it' (180). By the mid-seventies multiculturalism in children's literature was advocated as 'a desirable social value and one to be inculcated in child readers' (180). Multiculturalism in children's fiction was conceived as 'acceptance of difference and heterogeneity' which was in accordance with the general principles expressed by the Australian Council on population and Ethnic Affairs (1982). Stephens critiques a number of contemporary novels that deal with issues of multiculturalism and identity formation: On Loan (Anne Brooksbank), The Boys from Bondi (Alan Collins), Moving Out (Helen Garner & Jennifer Giles), New Patches for Old (Christobel Mattingly), Deepwater (Judith O'Neill), The Other Side of the Family (Maureen Pople), The Seventh Pebble (Eleanor Spence), Five Times Dizzy and Dancing in the Anzac Deli (Nadia Wheatley). He makes three pertinent claims regarding representations of multicultural identity and/or community in Australia: that the representation of multiculturalism is questionable in these novels as most of the authors do not come from a non-Anglo background; that there is a general subordination of the themes of migration and culture to the theme of personal identity development (a common thematic concern of children's literature); while the novels 'pivot on aspects of difference' the narratives are generally focalized through members of the majority culture and 'hence the privilege of narrative subjectivity is rarely bestowed upon minority groups' (181). Stephens posits that within the genre of children's fiction, 'the absence of significant migrant voices...leads to a partial and hence false, representation of the Australian experience of migration and the development of multiculturalism' (181).
Untitled Dinny Culican-Ward , 1987 single work review
— Appears in: LiNQ , vol. 15 no. 1 1987; (p. 104-106)

— Review of The Other Side of the Family Maureen Pople , 1986 single work novel ; Blue Days Donna Sharp , 1986 single work novel ; The Sky Between the Trees James Preston , 1986 single work novel
Untitled Faye Davis , 1987 single work review
— Appears in: Fremantle Arts Review , January vol. 2 no. 1 1987; (p. 14)

— Review of Blue Days Donna Sharp , 1986 single work novel ; The Other Side of the Family Maureen Pople , 1986 single work novel ; The Sky Between the Trees James Preston , 1986 single work novel
Untitled Carmel Ballinger , 1987 single work review
— Appears in: Magpies : Talking About Books for Children , May vol. 2 no. 2 1987; (p. 26)

— Review of The Other Side of the Family Maureen Pople , 1986 single work novel ; Blue Days Donna Sharp , 1986 single work novel ; The Sky Between the Trees James Preston , 1986 single work novel
Untitled Faye Davis , 1987 single work review
— Appears in: Fremantle Arts Review , January vol. 2 no. 1 1987; (p. 14)

— Review of Blue Days Donna Sharp , 1986 single work novel ; The Other Side of the Family Maureen Pople , 1986 single work novel ; The Sky Between the Trees James Preston , 1986 single work novel
Untitled Dinny Culican-Ward , 1987 single work review
— Appears in: LiNQ , vol. 15 no. 1 1987; (p. 104-106)

— Review of The Other Side of the Family Maureen Pople , 1986 single work novel ; Blue Days Donna Sharp , 1986 single work novel ; The Sky Between the Trees James Preston , 1986 single work novel
Maureen Pople : 'The Other Side of the Family' Bernadette Welch , 1995 single work review
— Appears in: Viewpoint : On Books for Young Adults , Autumn vol. 3 no. 1 1995; (p. 27)

— Review of The Other Side of the Family Maureen Pople , 1986 single work novel
Untitled Donna Ryan , 1987 single work review
— Appears in: Reading Time : The Journal of the Children's Book Council of Australia , vol. 31 no. 3 1987; (p. 76)

— Review of The Other Side of the Family Maureen Pople , 1986 single work novel
Attitudes to War in Australian Children's Literature Anne M. O'Sullivan , 1994 single work criticism
— Appears in: Papers : Explorations into Children's Literature , April vol. 5 no. 1 1994; (p. 34-48)
O'Sullivan seeks to 'identify attitudes to war in Australian children's literature' in the period 1914-1994, noting in particular the movement from identification with Britain and the Empire in the early decades of this period to an affinity with Asia and the Pacific in the latter decades (34). The discussion begins with a literature review of Australian and overseas critical research in this field and then surveys a large number of (mainly Australian) novels with war as the central/pivotal theme. O'Sullivan concludes that there has been a change in attitudes to war in Australian children's literature, whereby 'once Australia was part of the British Empire and prepared to fight for that anywhere in the world, now multicultural Australia takes a broader view and sees herself as part of a global family' (47).
Advocating Multiculturalism: Migrants in Australian Children's Literature After 1972 John Stephens , 1990 single work criticism
— Appears in: Children's Literature Association Quarterly , vol. 15 no. 4 1990; (p. 180-188)
This article is concerned with a major shift in Australian ideology and values that Stephens argues occurred during the 1970s. He argues that 'within a decade during the 1970s Australian political and educational institutions underwent a palpable shift towards an ideology of multiculturalism and Australian Children's Literature shifted with it' (180). By the mid-seventies multiculturalism in children's literature was advocated as 'a desirable social value and one to be inculcated in child readers' (180). Multiculturalism in children's fiction was conceived as 'acceptance of difference and heterogeneity' which was in accordance with the general principles expressed by the Australian Council on population and Ethnic Affairs (1982). Stephens critiques a number of contemporary novels that deal with issues of multiculturalism and identity formation: On Loan (Anne Brooksbank), The Boys from Bondi (Alan Collins), Moving Out (Helen Garner & Jennifer Giles), New Patches for Old (Christobel Mattingly), Deepwater (Judith O'Neill), The Other Side of the Family (Maureen Pople), The Seventh Pebble (Eleanor Spence), Five Times Dizzy and Dancing in the Anzac Deli (Nadia Wheatley). He makes three pertinent claims regarding representations of multicultural identity and/or community in Australia: that the representation of multiculturalism is questionable in these novels as most of the authors do not come from a non-Anglo background; that there is a general subordination of the themes of migration and culture to the theme of personal identity development (a common thematic concern of children's literature); while the novels 'pivot on aspects of difference' the narratives are generally focalized through members of the majority culture and 'hence the privilege of narrative subjectivity is rarely bestowed upon minority groups' (181). Stephens posits that within the genre of children's fiction, 'the absence of significant migrant voices...leads to a partial and hence false, representation of the Australian experience of migration and the development of multiculturalism' (181).
Last amended 23 Nov 2011 14:34:02
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