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The Barcoo : The Squatter's Song single work   poetry   "From the runs of the Narran, wide-dotted with sheep,"
Alternative title: The Barcoo : A Song of the Squatters; Bush Lyrics : No. I : Off to the Barcoo; The Barcoo
  • Author:agent Henry Kendall http://www.poetrylibrary.edu.au/poets/kendall-henry
Issue Details: First known date: 1862... 1862 The Barcoo : The Squatter's Song
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Notes

  • In his note which accompanied 'The Barcoo' and 'Uloola' when they appeared in the Sydney Mail in September 1862, Kendall indicated that both poems were from a MS. poem titled 'The Head Station.'

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Works about this Work

The Radiant Dream : Notes on Henry Kendall Adrian Mitchell , 1969 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Literary Studies , October vol. 4 no. 2 1969; (p. 99-114) Henry Kendall : The Muse of Australia 1992; (p. 37-53)
Mitchell looks to Kendall's poetry for a "system of images that amount to a loose poetic philosophy, an attitude of mind that is formulated emotionally rather than logically, but in any case consistently". Mitchell detects an observer who occupies a middle (dream-like) state beside a stream between differents poles such as real/ideal and city/forest. Although the observer seeks but can't find the source of this stream, he gains the ability to believe in poetic vision--the radiant dream. Mitchell argues that all of Kendall's poetry shows a progression towards the acceptance of this ability.
The Radiant Dream : Notes on Henry Kendall Adrian Mitchell , 1969 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Literary Studies , October vol. 4 no. 2 1969; (p. 99-114) Henry Kendall : The Muse of Australia 1992; (p. 37-53)
Mitchell looks to Kendall's poetry for a "system of images that amount to a loose poetic philosophy, an attitude of mind that is formulated emotionally rather than logically, but in any case consistently". Mitchell detects an observer who occupies a middle (dream-like) state beside a stream between differents poles such as real/ideal and city/forest. Although the observer seeks but can't find the source of this stream, he gains the ability to believe in poetic vision--the radiant dream. Mitchell argues that all of Kendall's poetry shows a progression towards the acceptance of this ability.
Last amended 24 Mar 2011 20:12:33
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