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The Gin single work   poetry   "Where spreads the sloping shaded turf"
Issue Details: First known date: 1831... 1831 The Gin
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Notes

  • 'Interesting early appeal for justice to the Aborigines. Spoken in part by the Gin while she waits at Coogee for her husband to return from the temptations of the "Sydney streets". Particularly Australian in description of scenery and birds, even though Gin has to speak such lines as "Avaunt ye from our merry land". - Webby

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Works about this Work

Learning to Love the Gum Tree Elizabeth Webby , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Island , Autumn no. 120 2010; (p. 44-50)
Speaking the Suffering Indigene : 'Native' Songs and Laments, 1820-1850 John O'Leary , 2009 single work criticism
— Appears in: Kunapipi , vol. 31 no. 1 2009; (p. 47-59)
'This article considers the many short poems published by settlers in British colonies and the United States in the early decades of the nineteenth century in which settlers voiced their concern about the suffering of indigenous peoples in the face of colonisation. Though the indigenous peoples in question were very different from one another, and the nature of colonisation in the various colonies and states by no means identical, this verse shows a remarkable homogeneity of style and tone, being an expression of a common evangelical tradition and a shared fascination with the indigenous Other. The article argues that while these poems were certainly conditioned by an ideology of European superiority, and raise issues of paternalism and agency, they were sincere expressions of outrage and sorrow, and should therefore be accorded more weight than they are usually granted by postcolonial critics.' Source: The author.
Wild Speech, Tame Speech, Real Speech? Written Renditions of Aboriginal Australian Speech, 1788-1850 Penny Van Toorn , 2007 single work criticism
— Appears in: Southerly , vol. 67 no. 1-2 2007; (p. 166-178)
The Aboriginal in Early Australian Literature Elizabeth Webby , 1980 single work criticism
— Appears in: Southerly , March vol. 40 no. 1 1980; (p. 45-63)

'The depiction of aboriginals in early Australian literature, i.e., that written before 1850, resembles in many respects their pictorial depiction as outlined by Bernard Smith in European Vision  and the South Pacific. Writers who attempted the longer literary forms on Australian themes — the epic poem or the novel — usually, like the landscape artists, placed the aboriginal to one side. He was part of the exotic background, representing for the post the old order which was rapidly giving way to the march of civilization, or, along with bushrangers, fire and Rood, providing the fiction writer with the necessary "adventures" to break up the drab monotony of outback life. Certain shorter pieces of prose and verse focused more directly on the aboriginal, In these he was often either refined and classicalized along the "noble savage" lines of Blake's engraving of an aboriginal family, or caricatured as a comic specimen of brute creation. During the eighteen—forties there are signs of a third, more realistic and anthropological, approach with the incorporation of aboriginal words into poems and attempts at detailed descriptions of their customs in prose, though still with traces of the old simplifications in the directions of refinement or comedy.'  (Publication abstract)

Wild Speech, Tame Speech, Real Speech? Written Renditions of Aboriginal Australian Speech, 1788-1850 Penny Van Toorn , 2007 single work criticism
— Appears in: Southerly , vol. 67 no. 1-2 2007; (p. 166-178)
Learning to Love the Gum Tree Elizabeth Webby , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Island , Autumn no. 120 2010; (p. 44-50)
Speaking the Suffering Indigene : 'Native' Songs and Laments, 1820-1850 John O'Leary , 2009 single work criticism
— Appears in: Kunapipi , vol. 31 no. 1 2009; (p. 47-59)
'This article considers the many short poems published by settlers in British colonies and the United States in the early decades of the nineteenth century in which settlers voiced their concern about the suffering of indigenous peoples in the face of colonisation. Though the indigenous peoples in question were very different from one another, and the nature of colonisation in the various colonies and states by no means identical, this verse shows a remarkable homogeneity of style and tone, being an expression of a common evangelical tradition and a shared fascination with the indigenous Other. The article argues that while these poems were certainly conditioned by an ideology of European superiority, and raise issues of paternalism and agency, they were sincere expressions of outrage and sorrow, and should therefore be accorded more weight than they are usually granted by postcolonial critics.' Source: The author.
The Aboriginal in Early Australian Literature Elizabeth Webby , 1980 single work criticism
— Appears in: Southerly , March vol. 40 no. 1 1980; (p. 45-63)

'The depiction of aboriginals in early Australian literature, i.e., that written before 1850, resembles in many respects their pictorial depiction as outlined by Bernard Smith in European Vision  and the South Pacific. Writers who attempted the longer literary forms on Australian themes — the epic poem or the novel — usually, like the landscape artists, placed the aboriginal to one side. He was part of the exotic background, representing for the post the old order which was rapidly giving way to the march of civilization, or, along with bushrangers, fire and Rood, providing the fiction writer with the necessary "adventures" to break up the drab monotony of outback life. Certain shorter pieces of prose and verse focused more directly on the aboriginal, In these he was often either refined and classicalized along the "noble savage" lines of Blake's engraving of an aboriginal family, or caricatured as a comic specimen of brute creation. During the eighteen—forties there are signs of a third, more realistic and anthropological, approach with the incorporation of aboriginal words into poems and attempts at detailed descriptions of their customs in prose, though still with traces of the old simplifications in the directions of refinement or comedy.'  (Publication abstract)

Last amended 6 Sep 2013 10:57:26
Subjects:
  • Coast,
  • Coogee, Randwick area, Sydney Eastern Suburbs, Sydney, New South Wales,
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