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Issue Details: First known date: 1995... 1995 Spaces in Her Day : Australian Women's Diaries of the 1920s and 1930s
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Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Notes:
bibl; port

Works about this Work

A 'Gift to the Nation' : The Diaries and Notebooks of CEW Bean Anne-Marie Conde , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Archives and Manuscripts , November vol. 39 no. 2 2011; (p. 43-64)
'How can we know what we think we know? Postmodernism insists that we can't. Seekers of historical knowledge have long looked in archives to understand the past but, as has often been discussed in archival literature, even archives are not the still points in a turning world we might have hoped for. It is not just that some records are privileged because they are selected for long-term preservation as archives while others are not. Even the records that do make it into the archives often have multifarious histories, both before and after they cross the threshold. Canadian archivist Tom Nesmith has noted that the process by which a record is created are complex, and that a record rarely comes to us unchanged from its initial inscription. These processes expand the evidence a record can carry, and he encourages us to understand 'the record we now have'. This article takes up that challenge by examining the diaries and notebooks of Charles Bean, official war correspondent and historian of Australia's part in World War I. Bean's diaries and notebooks offer a particularly rich example of how knowledge of the history of a record expands the evidence it can carry.' (43)
Untitled Susan Magarey , 1998 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Historical Studies , April vol. 29 no. 110 1998; (p. 155-156)

— Review of Spaces in Her Day : Australian Women's Diaries of the 1920s and 1930s Katie Holmes , 1995 single work criticism
Untitled Susan Magarey , 1998 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Historical Studies , April vol. 29 no. 110 1998; (p. 155-156)

— Review of Spaces in Her Day : Australian Women's Diaries of the 1920s and 1930s Katie Holmes , 1995 single work criticism
A 'Gift to the Nation' : The Diaries and Notebooks of CEW Bean Anne-Marie Conde , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Archives and Manuscripts , November vol. 39 no. 2 2011; (p. 43-64)
'How can we know what we think we know? Postmodernism insists that we can't. Seekers of historical knowledge have long looked in archives to understand the past but, as has often been discussed in archival literature, even archives are not the still points in a turning world we might have hoped for. It is not just that some records are privileged because they are selected for long-term preservation as archives while others are not. Even the records that do make it into the archives often have multifarious histories, both before and after they cross the threshold. Canadian archivist Tom Nesmith has noted that the process by which a record is created are complex, and that a record rarely comes to us unchanged from its initial inscription. These processes expand the evidence a record can carry, and he encourages us to understand 'the record we now have'. This article takes up that challenge by examining the diaries and notebooks of Charles Bean, official war correspondent and historian of Australia's part in World War I. Bean's diaries and notebooks offer a particularly rich example of how knowledge of the history of a record expands the evidence it can carry.' (43)
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