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Dharma Vehicle single work   poetry   "Out of the reach of voices"
Issue Details: First known date: 1985... 1985 Dharma Vehicle
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Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

  • Appears in:
    y separately published work icon Selected Poems 1963-1983 Robert Gray , North Ryde : Angus and Robertson , 1985 Z264699 1985 selected work poetry North Ryde : Angus and Robertson , 1985 pg. 72-86
  • Appears in:
    y separately published work icon Selected Poems Robert Gray , North Ryde : Angus and Robertson , 1990 Z425541 1990 selected work poetry North Ryde : Angus and Robertson , 1990 pg. 77-92
  • Appears in:
    y separately published work icon New and Selected Poems Robert Gray , Port Melbourne : Heinemann , 1995 Z284053 1995 selected work poetry Port Melbourne : Heinemann , 1995 pg. 75-90
  • Appears in:
    y separately published work icon New Selected Poems Robert Gray , Potts Point : Duffy and Snellgrove , 1998 Z247102 1998 selected work poetry Potts Point : Duffy and Snellgrove , 1998 pg. 75-90
  • Appears in:
    y separately published work icon Grass Script : Selected Earlier Poems. Robert Gray , Manchester : Carcanet , 2001 Z942576 2001 selected work poetry The poems in this representative collection were written between 1968 and 1987 and are drawn from Creek Water Journal (1974), Grass Script (1978), The Skylight (1983) and Piano (1988). Manchester : Carcanet , 2001 pg. 45-59
  • Appears in:
    y separately published work icon Cumulus : Collected Poems Robert Gray , St Kilda : John Leonard Press , 2012 Z1893435 2012 selected work poetry 'This book is a landmark in Australian poetry. For Cumulus, Robert Gray has chosen all he wishes to retain from his eight volumes of poetry, some of it considerably and significantly revised. He has included here a new book, "Nameless Earth", not previously published in Australia.

    'Gray has been a daring and original experimenter in the free verse line, and also at times with traditional forms. Equally, his work is notable for its frequent, uncanny rightness in the creation of images. His thinking shows a remarkable fluency in both Eastern and Western philosophies (Gray has referred to himself as a Buddhist heretic). These are all modernist pathways, and this poetry negotiates them with a lucid, classical temper.

    'Most striking is an ever-alert immediacy—a perception and reflectiveness in the fluid moment. Whether through his sensuous language or his powerful engagement with ideas, Gray's poetry continually opens us to a fresh involvement with the physical world.' (From the publisher's website.)
    St Kilda : John Leonard Press , 2012
    pg. 54-69

Works about this Work

Fields of Dharma : On T.S. Eliot and Robert Gray Kevin Hart , 2013 single work criticism
— Appears in: Literature and Theology , September vol. 27 no. 3 2013; (p. 267-284)
'This essay considers two quite different long religious poems of the twentieth century: T. S. Eliot's Four Quartets and Robert Gray's ‘Dharma Vehicle’. Both address cultural transitions of several sorts: Eliot in a poem that, while it involves various world religions, ends up affirming Christianity; and Gray in a poem that explores Buddhism. Each poem is centered on dharma, Eliot's on the Hindu sense and Gray's on the Buddhist sense. Each poem extends, in its own way, what counts as ‘religious poetry’, though Gray's poem shows us something unexpected: how Pound's poetry can be taken as a model for writing religious verse of a new kind.' (Author's abstract)
The Other Shore Is Here : Contemporary Poetry of the Sacred Bill Ashcroft , Frances Devlin-Glass , Lyn McCredden , 2009 single work criticism
— Appears in: Intimate Horizons : The Post-Colonial Sacred in Australian Literature 2009; (p. 243-286)
The 'Self' and the 'Other Selves' in Robert Gray's Poetry Evelyn Eli , 2006 single work criticism
— Appears in: Caring Cultures : Sharing Imaginations : Australia and India 2006; (p. 124-130)
The 'Self' and the 'Other Selves' in Robert Gray's Poetry Evelyn Eli , 2006 single work criticism
— Appears in: Caring Cultures : Sharing Imaginations : Australia and India 2006; (p. 124-130)
The Other Shore Is Here : Contemporary Poetry of the Sacred Bill Ashcroft , Frances Devlin-Glass , Lyn McCredden , 2009 single work criticism
— Appears in: Intimate Horizons : The Post-Colonial Sacred in Australian Literature 2009; (p. 243-286)
Fields of Dharma : On T.S. Eliot and Robert Gray Kevin Hart , 2013 single work criticism
— Appears in: Literature and Theology , September vol. 27 no. 3 2013; (p. 267-284)
'This essay considers two quite different long religious poems of the twentieth century: T. S. Eliot's Four Quartets and Robert Gray's ‘Dharma Vehicle’. Both address cultural transitions of several sorts: Eliot in a poem that, while it involves various world religions, ends up affirming Christianity; and Gray in a poem that explores Buddhism. Each poem is centered on dharma, Eliot's on the Hindu sense and Gray's on the Buddhist sense. Each poem extends, in its own way, what counts as ‘religious poetry’, though Gray's poem shows us something unexpected: how Pound's poetry can be taken as a model for writing religious verse of a new kind.' (Author's abstract)
Last amended 5 Feb 2013 17:19:30
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