y Zigzag Street single work   novel   humour  
Issue Details: First known date: 1996... 1996 Zigzag Street
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Notes

  • Sound recording and braille also available.
  • Other formats: Also sound recording and braille.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • Neutral Bay, North Sydney - Lane Cove area, Sydney Northern Suburbs, Sydney,: Anchor , 1996 .
      Extent: 275p.
      ISBN: 0868246786 (pbk)
      • Publisher: Pan
      London,
      c
      England,
      c
      c
      United Kingdom (UK),
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Pan ,
      1998 .
      Extent: 275p.
      ISBN: 0330355333(pbk.)
    • Milsons Point, North Sydney - Lane Cove area, Sydney Northern Suburbs, Sydney,: Bantam Books , 2000 .
      Extent: 275p.
      ISBN: 186325286X (pbk)
Alternative title: Zigzag Street : Roman Nick Earls
Language: German
    • Berlin,
      c
      Germany,
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Ullstein ,
      1998 .
      Extent: 375p.
      ISBN: 3548242480

Works about this Work

The Write Stuff Phil Brown , 2014 single work column
— Appears in: The Courier-Mail , 30 June 2014; (p. 4-5)
'Nick Earls returns to his comedic roots in a nostalgic novel that mines the angst of living in the 21st century...'
Books that Changed Me : Lisa Walker Lisa Walker , 2013 single work column
— Appears in: The Sun-Herald , 10 March 2013; (p. 12)
Truth or Dare Susan Johnson , 2012 single work column
— Appears in: The Courier-Mail , 26 - 27 May 2012; (p. 10-12)

'Some novelist court strife by pilfering character traits and plotlines from friends and lovers - but how far is too far?' Susan Johnson.

Engaging the Metaphorical City : Brisbane Male Fiction 1975-2007 Susan Carson , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Sweat : The Subtropical Imaginary 2011; (p. 45-53)
'Brisbane writers and writing are increasingly represented as important to the city's identity as a site of urban cool, at least in marketing and public relations paradigms. It is therefore remarkable that recent Brisbane fiction clings strongly to a particular relationship to the climatic and built environment that is often located in the past and which seemingly turns away, or at least elides, the 'new' technologically-driven Brisbane. Literary Brisbane is often depicted in the context of nostalgia for the Brisbane that once was—a tropical, timbered, luxuriant city in which sex is associated with heat, and, in particular, sweat. In this writing sweat can produced by adrenaline or heat, but in particular, in Brisbane novels, it is the sweat of sex that characterises the literary city. Given that Brisbane is in fact a subtropical city, it is interesting that metaphors of a tropical climate and vegetation occur so frequently in Brisbane stories (and narratives set in other parts of the state) that writer Thea Astley was prompted at one point to remark that Queensland writing was in danger of developing into a tropical cliché.' Susan Carson.
We Call Upon the Author to Explain : Theorising Writers' Festivals as Sites of Contemporary Public Culture Cori Stewart , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , Special Issue 2010;
'This paper outlines a new vantage point for theorising today’s writers’ festivals as significant sites of contemporary public culture. Increasingly writers’ festivals claim to be both popular and important sites of public discussion and debate, and this paper’s empirical analysis of the 2007 Brisbane Writers Festival bears out these qualities. Yet, this Festival also positions itself as a thinking person’s alternative to the ‘unstoppable urge in TV and newspapers towards providing infotainment’, and claims ‘people are looking to our writers for the tools with which to think, not to be told what to think’ (Campbell, Making Sense of Our World). Addressing the mix of claims made for the 2007 Brisbane Writers Festival, as well as analysing the the topics discussed at the Festival, this paper examines the Festival’s multiple public culture roles and functions. Included in the topics discussed at the Festival are those typically produced and ciruclated in the media such as celebrity culture, and rather than viewing this content as trivialising and manipulative─as many critics of writers’ festivals have done─this paper illustrates how the media extended the 2007 Brisbane Writers Festival’s public culture function.' (Author's abstract)
Same Again? Sure Thing, Matey Robin Lucas , 1996 single work review
— Appears in: The Bulletin , 29 October vol. 116 no. 6044 1996; (p. 94-95)

— Review of Kindling Does for Firewood Richard King 1996 single work novel ; Zigzag Street Nick Earls 1996 single work novel ; Keep It Simple, Stupid Peter Goldsworthy 1996 single work novel
All You Read is Love Margaret Simons , 1996 single work review
— Appears in: The Australian's Review of Books , October vol. 1 no. 2 1996; (p. 3-4)

— Review of Passing Remarks Helen Hodgman 1996 single work novel ; Zigzag Street Nick Earls 1996 single work novel ; Australian Love Stories 1996 anthology short story extract ; Hungry Ghosts Susan Johnson 1996 single work novel
Delectably Wry Katharine England , 1996 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , November no. 186 1996; (p. 52-53)

— Review of An Evening with the Messiah Catherine Jinks 1996 single work novel ; Zigzag Street Nick Earls 1996 single work novel
From the Belly of Lucifer, Many a Tall Story and True Tony Squires , 1996 single work review
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 7 September 1996; (p. 13s)

— Review of Zigzag Street Nick Earls 1996 single work novel ; Love Shack Richard van Lieven 1996 single work novel
Slick Farce Deals with the Absurdities of Solo Suburbia Bron Sibree , 1996 single work review
— Appears in: The Canberra Times , 21 September 1996; (p. C11)

— Review of Zigzag Street Nick Earls 1996 single work novel
More to offer than Baywatch - International Press Commentary on the Release of Australian Novels Lara Cain , 2001 single work criticism
— Appears in: Inter-Cultural Studies , February vol. 1 no. 1 2001; (p. 7-13)
A City in Its Own Write Phil Brown , 2009 single work column
— Appears in: Brisbane News , 6 - 12 May no. 733 2009; (p. 12-13)
We Call Upon the Author to Explain : Theorising Writers' Festivals as Sites of Contemporary Public Culture Cori Stewart , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , Special Issue 2010;
'This paper outlines a new vantage point for theorising today’s writers’ festivals as significant sites of contemporary public culture. Increasingly writers’ festivals claim to be both popular and important sites of public discussion and debate, and this paper’s empirical analysis of the 2007 Brisbane Writers Festival bears out these qualities. Yet, this Festival also positions itself as a thinking person’s alternative to the ‘unstoppable urge in TV and newspapers towards providing infotainment’, and claims ‘people are looking to our writers for the tools with which to think, not to be told what to think’ (Campbell, Making Sense of Our World). Addressing the mix of claims made for the 2007 Brisbane Writers Festival, as well as analysing the the topics discussed at the Festival, this paper examines the Festival’s multiple public culture roles and functions. Included in the topics discussed at the Festival are those typically produced and ciruclated in the media such as celebrity culture, and rather than viewing this content as trivialising and manipulative─as many critics of writers’ festivals have done─this paper illustrates how the media extended the 2007 Brisbane Writers Festival’s public culture function.' (Author's abstract)
Truth or Dare Susan Johnson , 2012 single work column
— Appears in: The Courier-Mail , 26 - 27 May 2012; (p. 10-12)

'Some novelist court strife by pilfering character traits and plotlines from friends and lovers - but how far is too far?' Susan Johnson.

Engaging the Metaphorical City : Brisbane Male Fiction 1975-2007 Susan Carson , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Sweat : The Subtropical Imaginary 2011; (p. 45-53)
'Brisbane writers and writing are increasingly represented as important to the city's identity as a site of urban cool, at least in marketing and public relations paradigms. It is therefore remarkable that recent Brisbane fiction clings strongly to a particular relationship to the climatic and built environment that is often located in the past and which seemingly turns away, or at least elides, the 'new' technologically-driven Brisbane. Literary Brisbane is often depicted in the context of nostalgia for the Brisbane that once was—a tropical, timbered, luxuriant city in which sex is associated with heat, and, in particular, sweat. In this writing sweat can produced by adrenaline or heat, but in particular, in Brisbane novels, it is the sweat of sex that characterises the literary city. Given that Brisbane is in fact a subtropical city, it is interesting that metaphors of a tropical climate and vegetation occur so frequently in Brisbane stories (and narratives set in other parts of the state) that writer Thea Astley was prompted at one point to remark that Queensland writing was in danger of developing into a tropical cliché.' Susan Carson.
Last amended 6 Sep 2011 11:05:32
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  • Red Hill, Kelvin Grove, Brisbane - North West, Brisbane, Queensland,
  • 1990s
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