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y separately published work icon By Reef and Palm selected work   short story  
Is part of Autonym Library series - publisher
Issue Details: First known date: 1894... 1894 By Reef and Palm
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Notes

  • Also published in sound recording format
  • Other editions: French, 1903
  • Introduction by the Earl of Pembroke

Contents

* Contents derived from the London,
c
England,
c
c
United Kingdom (UK),
c
Western Europe, Europe,
:
T. Fisher Unwin , 1898 version. Please note that other versions/publications may contain different contents. See the Publication Details.
Challis, the Doubter : The White Lady and the Brown Woman, Louis Becke , 1893 single work short story Challis the Doubter
"'Tis in the Blood" , Malie , 1893 single work short story
The Revenge of Macy O'Shea : A Story of the Marquesas, Louis Becke , 1893 single work short story
Rangers of the Tia Kau, Louis Becke , 1893 single work short story
A Basket of Breadfruit, Louis Becke , 1893 single work short story
Enderby's Courtship, Louis Becke , 1893 single work short story
Long Charley's Good Little Wife, Louis Becke , 1893 single work short story
A Truly Great Man : A Mid-Pacific Sketch, Louis Becke , 1893 single work short story
The Doctor's Wife : Consanguinity (From a Polynesian Standpoint), Louis Becke , 1893 single work short story
The Fate of the Alida, Louis Becke , 1893 single work short story
The Chilean Bluejacket, Louis Becke , 1898 single work short story
His Native Wife, Louis Becke , 1895 single work novella

John Barrington takes a berth as a second mate to return to the Caroline Islands, where he left his Islander wife two years before. The ship is carrying three passengers, a missionary and his wife and her sister. The missionary, Parker, and his wife knew Barrington previously and Mrs Parker is secretly in love with him.

Barrington's wife, Nadee, is waiting for him on the island of Losap with her grandmother, who hates Europeans and endeavours to convince Nadee that Barrington will not return. When he does reach the island, in dramatic circumstances, a misunderstanding is deliberately perpetuated and tragedy ensues.

Becke also uses this narrative to put forward vitriolic views of missionaries and the harm he believes they cause.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • London,
      c
      England,
      c
      c
      United Kingdom (UK),
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      T. Fisher Unwin ,
      1894 .

      Holdings

      Held at: State Library of Victoria
    • Philadelphia, Pennsylvania,
      c
      United States of America (USA),
      c
      Americas,
      :
      Lippincott ,
      1895 .
      Extent: 220p.
    • London,
      c
      England,
      c
      c
      United Kingdom (UK),
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      T. Fisher Unwin ,
      1895 .
      Extent: 220p.
      Note/s:
      • Number 3 of the Autonym Library series
    • Salem, New Hampshire,
      c
      United States of America (USA),
      c
      Americas,
      :
      Ayer ,
      1977 .
      Edition info: Facsimile

Works about this Work

Literature of the Pacific, Mainly Australian Peter Pierce , 2013 single work criticism
— Appears in: Etropic : Electronic Journal of Studies in the Tropics , vol. 12 no. 2 2013; (p. 210-219)

This lecture is in some ways the ‘lost’ chapter of The Cambridge History of Australian Literature (2009), one eventually not written because the projected author could find not enough literary material even in that vast Pacific Ocean, or perhaps found – as mariners have – only far separated specks in that ocean. Yet Australian literature about the nation’s Pacific littoral and the islands within the ocean and the ocean itself is varied, considerable, and often eccentric. Our greatest drinking song is Barry Humphries’s ‘The Old Pacific Sea’. The Japs and the jungle are the hallmarks of fiction, poetry and reportage of the Pacific War of 1942-5. New Guinea has attracted such writers as James McAuley, Peter Ryan, Trevor Shearston, Randolph Stow and Drusilla Modjeska. The short stories of Louis Becke are the most extensive and iconoclastic writing about the Pacific by any Australian. Yet the literature of the Pacific littoral seems thinner than that of the Indian Ocean. The map on the title page of Rolf Boldrewood’s A Modern Buccaneer (1894) shows those afore-mentioned specks in a vast expanse of water. What aesthetic challenges have Pacific writing posed and how have they been met? Have the waters of the Pacific satisfied Australians as a near offshore playground but defeated wider efforts of the imagination? ' (Publication summary)

'The White Lady and the Brown Women' : Colonial Masculinity and Domesticity in Louis Becke's By Reef and Palm Sumangala Bhattacharya , 2013 single work criticism
— Appears in: Oceania and the Victorian Imagination : Where All Things Are Possible 2013; (p. 79-92)
Louis Becke, the Bulletin and By Reef and Palm Chris Tiffin , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: Kunapipi , vol. 34 no. 2 2012; (p. 163-169)
Why Men Leave Home : The Flight of the Suburban Male in Some Popular Australian Fiction 1910-1950 Michael Sharkey , 2009 single work criticism
— Appears in: Serious Frolic : Essays on Australian Humour 2009; (p. 110-123)
A Puzzle of Annotation Jack Bradstreet , 2000 single work essay
— Appears in: Fellows of the Book : a volume of essays commemorating the 50th anniversary of Biblionews 2000; (p. 191-200)
Untitled 1955 single work review
— Appears in: The Cairns Post , 20 August 1955; (p. 3)

— Review of By Reef and Palm Louis Becke , 1894 selected work short story
Untitled 1895 single work review
— Appears in: The Bulletin , 12 January vol. 14 no. 778 1895; (p. 7)

— Review of By Reef and Palm Louis Becke , 1894 selected work short story
Untitled Douglas Stewart , 1955 single work review
— Appears in: The Bulletin , 17 August vol. 76 no. 3940 1955; (p. 2)

— Review of By Reef and Palm Louis Becke , 1894 selected work short story ; The Birdsville Track and Other Poems Douglas Stewart , 1955 selected work poetry
Short Views P. K. Elkin , 1956 single work review
— Appears in: Southerly , vol. 17 no. 4 1956; (p. 233-234)

— Review of By Reef and Palm Louis Becke , 1894 selected work short story
Why Men Leave Home : The Flight of the Suburban Male in Some Popular Australian Fiction 1910-1950 Michael Sharkey , 2009 single work criticism
— Appears in: Serious Frolic : Essays on Australian Humour 2009; (p. 110-123)
Romance Fiction of the 1890s Peter Pierce , 1996 single work criticism
— Appears in: The 1890s : Australian Literature and Literary Culture 1996; (p. 150-164)
A Parcel of Books Annie Bright , 1894 single work criticism
— Appears in: Cosmos Magazine , 30 November vol. 1 no. 3 1894; (p. 184-188)
Wrecked Illusions : Dedicated to Louis Becke i "You are now in London town, Louis Becke,", Victor J. Daley , 1903 single work poetry
— Appears in: The Bulletin , 17 September vol. 24 no. 1231 1903; (p. 35)
y separately published work icon Writing the Colonial Adventure : Race, Gender and Nation in Anglo-Australian Popular Fiction, 1875-1914 Robert Dixon , Oakleigh : Cambridge University Press , 1995 Z480378 1995 single work criticism

'This book is an exploration of popular late nineteenth-century texts that show Australia - along with Africa, India and the Pacific Islands - to be a preferred site of imperial adventure. Focusing on the period from the advent of the new imperialism in the 1870s to the outbreak of World War I, Robert Dixon looks at a selection of British and Australian writers. Their books, he argues, offer insights into the construction of empire, masculinity, race, and Australian nationhood and identity. Writing the Colonial Adventure shows that the genre of adventure/romance was highly popular throughout this period. The book examines the variety of themes within their narrative form that captured many aspects of imperial ideology. In considering the broader ramifications of these works, Professor Dixon develops an original approach to popular fiction, both for its own sake and as a mode of cultural history.' (Introduction)

Last amended 20 Jan 2011 12:52:33
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