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Issue Details: First known date: 1954... 1954 Cockatoos : A Story of Youth and Exodists
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Notes

  • The third novel in a trilogy which begins with Up the Country and then Ten Creeks Run.
  • Available in braille format.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Alternative title: Cockatoos: A Novel of Youth and Exodists.
    • North Ryde, Ryde - Gladesville - Hunters Hill area, Northwest Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales,: Eden Paperbacks , 1989 .
      Extent: 274p.
      Description: port.
      ISBN: 0207163022 (pbk.)
      Series: Eden Paperbacks Angus and Robertson (publisher), 1987 series - publisher This paperback imprint of Angus and Robertson was launched in September 1987. The first titles included Upfield's Winds of Evil and Derryn Hinch's Death at Newport.

Works about this Work

Drawing off the Rich Cream : The Struggle in London Peter Morton , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Lusting for London : Australian Expatriate Writers at the Hub of Empire, 1870-1950 2011; (p. 91-110)
'The rich cream of Miles Franklin's simile on some cases maintained its sweetly luscious quality in England, but in others it turned out to be just skim milk after all, or else the vinegary life of the metropolis soon curdled it. Franklin herself knew this very well. She found no real literary success herself in London, and permits the authorial voice in Cockatoos (speaking from her own experience) to strike a conspiratorial note, with a warning of a deliberate censoring of bad news from the capital. "The facts about those who starved in the Big Smoke until the hat went round to generous compatriots to send them home," says the narrator darkly, " were not in the Sydney newspapers and did not weigh against successes." Perhaps so, but there was always room in the newspapers for yet another report on that most acceptable and uplifting trajectory of the expatriate: the longing to leave, the confused arrival, the temporary disillusionment, the struggle, the slowly rising fortunes, the moderate or great success: in short, the good news that the game plan had worked. The fewer the initial prospects, the more unlikely the ascent, the more the stay-at-homes were eager for details.' (Authors introduction 91-92)
A Gout of Bile : Metic and Immigrant Expatriates Peter Morton , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Lusting for London : Australian Expatriate Writers at the Hub of Empire, 1870-1950 2011; (p. 37-55)
'In the unpublished novel by the young Philip Lindsay, The Mangle...there is a fine scene when the character Ronnie Doebrook is leaving for England. He does not expect ever to return. As his liner pulls away from the Sydney dockside, Ronnie picks up one of the yellow paper streamers dangling over the rail, raises it to his lips, and pretends to send a gout of bile spurting over his receding friends and relatives. It is his parting comment on his birthplace. He is realizing his wish. Already he has become - what? An emigrant? An exile? Or an expatirate?' (Author's introduction 36)
Why Men Leave Home : The Flight of the Suburban Male in Some Popular Australian Fiction 1910-1950 Michael Sharkey , 2009 single work criticism
— Appears in: Serious Frolic : Essays on Australian Humour 2009; (p. 110-123)
'Only Scratch the Surface' : Reading Franklin's Cockatoos Leigh Dale , 2007 single work criticism
— Appears in: Southerly , vol. 67 no. 1-2 2007; (p. 377-390)
Joseph Furphy and Miles Franklin (from The Order of Things) John Barnes , 1990 extract criticism (The Order of Things : A Life of Joseph Furphy)
— Appears in: Overland , Winter no. 119 1990; (p. 78-86)
Cockatoos 1954 single work review
— Appears in: The Cairns Post , 11 September 1954; (p. 4)

— Review of Cockatoos : A Story of Youth and Exodists Brent of Bin Bin , 1954 single work novel
Untitled P. K. Elkin , 1954 single work review
— Appears in: Journal and Proceedings of the Royal Australian Historical Society , vol. 40 no. 1954; (p. 286-288)

— Review of Cockatoos : A Story of Youth and Exodists Brent of Bin Bin , 1954 single work novel
More Brent of Bin Bin 1954 single work review
— Appears in: The Bulletin , 8 September vol. 75 no. 3891 1954; (p. 2)

— Review of Cockatoos : A Story of Youth and Exodists Brent of Bin Bin , 1954 single work novel
That Shy Bin Bin Bird S.H. (fl.1950-1959) , 1954 single work review
— Appears in: The Sun-Herald , 25 July 1954; (p. 48)

— Review of Cockatoos : A Story of Youth and Exodists Brent of Bin Bin , 1954 single work novel
What's New in Paperbacks 1989 single work review
— Appears in: The Mercury , 24 June 1989; (p. 20)

— Review of Cockatoos : A Story of Youth and Exodists Brent of Bin Bin , 1954 single work novel
'Only Scratch the Surface' : Reading Franklin's Cockatoos Leigh Dale , 2007 single work criticism
— Appears in: Southerly , vol. 67 no. 1-2 2007; (p. 377-390)
Why Men Leave Home : The Flight of the Suburban Male in Some Popular Australian Fiction 1910-1950 Michael Sharkey , 2009 single work criticism
— Appears in: Serious Frolic : Essays on Australian Humour 2009; (p. 110-123)
A Gout of Bile : Metic and Immigrant Expatriates Peter Morton , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Lusting for London : Australian Expatriate Writers at the Hub of Empire, 1870-1950 2011; (p. 37-55)
'In the unpublished novel by the young Philip Lindsay, The Mangle...there is a fine scene when the character Ronnie Doebrook is leaving for England. He does not expect ever to return. As his liner pulls away from the Sydney dockside, Ronnie picks up one of the yellow paper streamers dangling over the rail, raises it to his lips, and pretends to send a gout of bile spurting over his receding friends and relatives. It is his parting comment on his birthplace. He is realizing his wish. Already he has become - what? An emigrant? An exile? Or an expatirate?' (Author's introduction 36)
Drawing off the Rich Cream : The Struggle in London Peter Morton , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Lusting for London : Australian Expatriate Writers at the Hub of Empire, 1870-1950 2011; (p. 91-110)
'The rich cream of Miles Franklin's simile on some cases maintained its sweetly luscious quality in England, but in others it turned out to be just skim milk after all, or else the vinegary life of the metropolis soon curdled it. Franklin herself knew this very well. She found no real literary success herself in London, and permits the authorial voice in Cockatoos (speaking from her own experience) to strike a conspiratorial note, with a warning of a deliberate censoring of bad news from the capital. "The facts about those who starved in the Big Smoke until the hat went round to generous compatriots to send them home," says the narrator darkly, " were not in the Sydney newspapers and did not weigh against successes." Perhaps so, but there was always room in the newspapers for yet another report on that most acceptable and uplifting trajectory of the expatriate: the longing to leave, the confused arrival, the temporary disillusionment, the struggle, the slowly rising fortunes, the moderate or great success: in short, the good news that the game plan had worked. The fewer the initial prospects, the more unlikely the ascent, the more the stay-at-homes were eager for details.' (Authors introduction 91-92)
The Boer War: Paterson, Abbott, Brennan, Miles Franklin and Morant Shirley Walker , 1985 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Literary Studies , October vol. 12 no. 2 1985; (p. 207-222)
Last amended 22 Nov 2006 17:10:19
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