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Issue Details: First known date: 1992... 1992 The Dark Side of the Dreaming: Aboriginality and Australian Culture
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Works about this Work

Intertexts of Capricornia Russell McDougall , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Shadow of the Precursor 2012; (p. 62-73)
'This chapter explores some of the many illuminating literary as well as film intertexts of Xavier Herbert's "vast" 1938 novel Capricornia, looking backwards and forwards in time. It considers both "vertical and "horizontal" types of intertextuality. Thus, some relationships begin with reference to another literary text ("horizontal"), while others work across modes, from novel to film or vice versa ("vertical"). Locating the novel in terms of a global system of intertexts, the chapter offers a balance to readings that attempt to objectify and limit the novel's "reality," especially by narrowly nation-focused explanations. The effect is expansive, moving between conventional literary codes of meaning and into mythic, cartographic and astrological realms of apprehension. What emerges is a text just as impure as the novel's own social idealism - a creole text to embody the Creole Nation. (62)
Intertexts of Capricornia Russell McDougall , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Shadow of the Precursor 2012; (p. 62-73)
'This chapter explores some of the many illuminating literary as well as film intertexts of Xavier Herbert's "vast" 1938 novel Capricornia, looking backwards and forwards in time. It considers both "vertical and "horizontal" types of intertextuality. Thus, some relationships begin with reference to another literary text ("horizontal"), while others work across modes, from novel to film or vice versa ("vertical"). Locating the novel in terms of a global system of intertexts, the chapter offers a balance to readings that attempt to objectify and limit the novel's "reality," especially by narrowly nation-focused explanations. The effect is expansive, moving between conventional literary codes of meaning and into mythic, cartographic and astrological realms of apprehension. What emerges is a text just as impure as the novel's own social idealism - a creole text to embody the Creole Nation. (62)
328-333 The Dark Side of the Dreaming: Aboriginality and Australian Culturesmall AustLit logo Australian Literary Studies
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