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y separately published work icon Children of the Bush selected work   short story   poetry   prose  
  • Author:agent Henry Lawson http://www.poetrylibrary.edu.au/poets/lawson-henry
Issue Details: First known date: 1902... 1902 Children of the Bush
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Notes

  • Other formats: Also braille, e-book.

Contents

* Contents derived from the London,
c
England,
c
c
United Kingdom (UK),
c
Western Europe, Europe,
:
Methuen , 1902 version. Please note that other versions/publications may contain different contents. See the Publication Details.
The Shearersi"No church-bell rings them from the Track,", Henry Lawson , 1902 single work poetry (p. ix-x)
Send Round the Hat, Henry Lawson , 1902 single work short story humour (p. [1]- 21)
'G.S.' or The Fourth Cooki"He has notions of Australia from the tales that he's been told-", Henry Lawson , 1902 single work poetry (p. 22-23)
That Pretty Girl in the Army, Henry Lawson , 1902 single work short story
The hard men of Bourke are drawn to the pretty young Salvation Army girl who moves to their town. They are surprised by her reaction to Jack Moonlight, a swagman, who turns out to be her former lover.
(p. 24-45)
Lord Douglas, Henry Lawson , 1902 single work short story
'Lord Douglas' is unpopular in Bourke, where his aristocratic ways bring him into conflict with the union men. However the same union men care for his wife and children when he is jailed for two years, and even take up a collection when he is released.
(p. 46-59)
Jack Cornstalki"I met with Jack Cornstalk in London to-day,", Henry Lawson , 1902 single work poetry humour (p. 60)
The Blindness of One-Eyed Bogan, Henry Lawson , 1902 single work short story humour (p. 61-71)
Sacred to the Memory of `Unknown'i"Oh, the wild black swans fly westward still,", Henry Lawson , 1902 single work poetry (p. 72-73)
Two Sundowners, Henry Lawson , 1902 single work short story humour (p. 74-85)
A Sketch of Mateship, Henry Lawson , 1902 single work short story (p. 86-87)
A Bush Publican's Lament, Henry Lawson , 1902 single work short story humour (p. 88-91)
The Bulletin Hoteli"I was drifting in the drizzle past the Cecil in the Strand -", Henry Lawson , 1901 single work poetry (p. 92-93)
On the Tucker Track : A Steelman Story, Henry Lawson , 1902 single work short story humour (p. 94-98)
The Ballad of the Rouseabouti"A rouseabout of rouseabouts, from any land - or none -", Henry Lawson , 1900 single work short story (p. 99-102)
The Shearer's Dream, Henry Lawson , 1902 single work short story (p. 103-107)
The Lost Soul's Hotel, Henry Lawson , 1902 single work short story (p. 108-120)
The Boozers' Home, Henry Lawson , 1902 single work short story (p. 121-126)
The Sex Problem Again, Henry Lawson , 1902 single work short story (p. 127-132)
The Things We Dare Not Telli"The fields are fair in autumn yet, and the sun's still shining there,", Henry Lawson , 1902 single work poetry (p. 133-134)
The Romance of the Swag, Henry Lawson , 1902 single work short story (p. 135-141)

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • London,
      c
      England,
      c
      c
      United Kingdom (UK),
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Methuen ,
      1902 .
      Link: U21870Full text document Digital copy of 1902 edition.See copyright information on site for any usage restrictions.
      Extent: xii, 292, 40 p.p.
      Note/s:
      • Dedication: To Bertha
        Rest, for your eyes are weary, girl; you have driven the worst away;
        The ghost of the man that I might have been is gone from my heart to-day!
        We'll live for life and the best it brings till our twilight shadows fall:
        My heart grows brave, and the world, my girl, is a good world after all.
      • Epigraph: 'They hurry the blacksheep down to the ships-
        Society's banned and cursed-
        And the boys look back as the old land dips:
        Some with a reckless laugh on their lips,
        And some with a prayer reversed.
        And it's 'Good-bye, England!' and Good-bye, Love!'
        And -perhaps it is just as well...-Will Ogilvie.

      • Includes a 40 page publisher's catalogue of books and announcements at back of volume.
      Series: Methuen's Colonial Library Methuen (publisher), series - publisher
    • Sydney, New South Wales,: Angus and Robertson , 1907 .
      Note/s:
      • Printed in England from Methuen sheets and bound in Sydney by Websdale, Shoosmith and Company (Mackaness)
      • Listed in Miller and Mackaness.
Notes:
In this edition the poems in the earlier editions were removed. They are included in When I Was King and Other Verses.
    • Sydney, New South Wales,: Angus and Robertson , 1910 .
      Printed by W. C. Penfold
      Extent: 266, 32p.p.
      Reprinted: 1913
      Note/s:
      • Booklet of publisher's advertisements bound in at back, dated 1909.
      • Mackaness gives date as 1909 for The Billy Boils edition. This 1910 edition makes no reference to that.

Works about this Work

The Making of a Legend : Henry Lawson at Bourke John Barnes , 2017 single work biography
— Appears in: The La Trobe Journal , March no. 99 2017; (p. 35-49)
'‘If you know Bourke, you know Australia’, Henry Lawson wrote to Edward Garnett in February 1902, a few months before returning to Australia from England. He explained to Garnett that his new collection of stories, which he hen called ‘The Heart of Australia’, was ‘centred at Bourke and all the Union leaders are in it'. (When published later that year it was entitled Children of he Bush – a title probably chosen by the London publisher.) A decade after e had been there, Lawson was revisiting in memory a place that had had a profound influence on him. It is no exaggeration to say that his one and only stay in what he and other Australians called the ‘Out Back’ was crucial to his envelopment as a prose writer. Without the months that he spent in the northest of New South Wales, it is unlikely that he would ever have achieved the legendary status that he did as an interpreter of ‘the real Australia’.' (Introduction)
"A Man Apart :" The Unwritten Tragedy of Henry Lawson John Barnes , 2016 single work criticism
— Appears in: Journal of the European Association for Studies on Australia , vol. 7 no. 1 2016;

' When Henry Lawson died in 1922, he was publicly honoured as a "national writer," but for the last twenty years of his life he had been a "derelict artist," caught in a cycle of poverty, alcoholism and depression, humiliated, frustrated, often ashamed of the work that he was producing and haunted by the sense of the writer that he might have been. Almost a century later, there is no biography that adequately portrays the man and the circumstances that contributed to his collapse. Underlying this article, which considers aspects of his struggle to realize his literary ambitions, is the assumption that because Lawson's work has such a strong autobiographical element, the way in which his life is read inevitably colours how his writing is read. Until there is a biography in which the tragic dimension of his life is fully recognized, our understanding of Lawson's literary achievement remains incomplete.' (Publication abstract)

The Jolly Swagman Bruce Moore , 2007 single work column
— Appears in: Ozwords , October vol. 16 no. 1 2007; (p. 6)
Untitled 1902 single work review
— Appears in: The Queenslander , 20 December 1902; (p. 1356)

— Review of Children of the Bush Henry Lawson , 1902 selected work short story poetry prose ; A Book of Sonnets J. B. O'Hara , 1902 selected work poetry
Henry Lawson 1902 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Bulletin , 30 October vol. 23 no. 1185 1902; (p. 2)
Untitled 1902 single work review
— Appears in: The Queenslander , 20 December 1902; (p. 1356)

— Review of Children of the Bush Henry Lawson , 1902 selected work short story poetry prose ; A Book of Sonnets J. B. O'Hara , 1902 selected work poetry
Henry Lawson 1902 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Bulletin , 30 October vol. 23 no. 1185 1902; (p. 2)
The Jolly Swagman Bruce Moore , 2007 single work column
— Appears in: Ozwords , October vol. 16 no. 1 2007; (p. 6)
"A Man Apart :" The Unwritten Tragedy of Henry Lawson John Barnes , 2016 single work criticism
— Appears in: Journal of the European Association for Studies on Australia , vol. 7 no. 1 2016;

' When Henry Lawson died in 1922, he was publicly honoured as a "national writer," but for the last twenty years of his life he had been a "derelict artist," caught in a cycle of poverty, alcoholism and depression, humiliated, frustrated, often ashamed of the work that he was producing and haunted by the sense of the writer that he might have been. Almost a century later, there is no biography that adequately portrays the man and the circumstances that contributed to his collapse. Underlying this article, which considers aspects of his struggle to realize his literary ambitions, is the assumption that because Lawson's work has such a strong autobiographical element, the way in which his life is read inevitably colours how his writing is read. Until there is a biography in which the tragic dimension of his life is fully recognized, our understanding of Lawson's literary achievement remains incomplete.' (Publication abstract)

The Making of a Legend : Henry Lawson at Bourke John Barnes , 2017 single work biography
— Appears in: The La Trobe Journal , March no. 99 2017; (p. 35-49)
'‘If you know Bourke, you know Australia’, Henry Lawson wrote to Edward Garnett in February 1902, a few months before returning to Australia from England. He explained to Garnett that his new collection of stories, which he hen called ‘The Heart of Australia’, was ‘centred at Bourke and all the Union leaders are in it'. (When published later that year it was entitled Children of he Bush – a title probably chosen by the London publisher.) A decade after e had been there, Lawson was revisiting in memory a place that had had a profound influence on him. It is no exaggeration to say that his one and only stay in what he and other Australians called the ‘Out Back’ was crucial to his envelopment as a prose writer. Without the months that he spent in the northest of New South Wales, it is unlikely that he would ever have achieved the legendary status that he did as an interpreter of ‘the real Australia’.' (Introduction)
Last amended 19 Feb 2015 09:43:22
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