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Issue Details: First known date: 1992... 1992 The Yellow Lady : Australian Impressions of Asia
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Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Works about this Work

Representing ‘the Other’ in the Fiction of Alex Miller Elizabeth Webby , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Novels of Alex Miller : An Introduction 2012; (p. 114-124)
'Alex Miller began publishing his novels in 1988 at the end of a period of intense debate in literary circles about the ethics of representation, a debate informed by feminism, multiculturalism and postcolonialism. Put crudely, the debate was about whether white, male writers from first-world countries, the dominant literary players up to this point, should continue to have open slather in writing about their others, i.e. those who were not white or male, now that these others were at last finding their voices and writing back.

In Australia, the debate was particularly focused on the question of white writers' representation of Aboriginals. Indeed, in 1979 I was told, after giving a conference paper on colonial poems about Aboriginals, that I was lucky there were no Aboriginals in the audience. But in feminist circles male appropriation of female voices was also a major issue. Although a total ban on representations of others would clearly have meant the end of fiction as we know it, these debates did draw attention to the stereotyped representations of women, Aboriginals, Chinese and other 'others' found in much earlier Australian writing.

When I first read Alex Miller, soon after The Ancestor Game was published in 1992, I was struck by the unusual empathy shown here for his female characters and their predicaments, as well as by his insightful depictions of people from other cultures. These have continued to be hallmarks of his fiction, with representations of 'otherness' also extending to animals, especially in The Tivington Nott and Landscape of Farewell. My paper, however, will have as its focus The Ancestor Game, Conditions of Faith and Lovesong.' (Author's abstract)
Reading Asia : Musings of a Peripatetic Writer Satendra Nandan , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: Transnational Literature , May vol. 4 no. 2 2012;
Notes for a paper delivered at the National Conference of the Australian Association of Teaching English (ATTE) on the theme ‘Finding a Place for Falstaff’, Melbourne Cricket Ground, December 2011
A Question with Many Answers Julianne Schultz , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: Griffith Review , Winter no. 36 2012; (p. 7-10)
Racial Melancholia in Brian Castro’s Chinese-Australian Historical Fiction Hoa Pham , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Journal of Australian Writers and Writing , May no. 1 2010; (p. 65-72)
Paperbacks Tony Maniaty , 1996 single work review
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 12-13 October 1996; (p. rev 9)

— Review of The Yellow Lady : Australian Impressions of Asia Alison Broinowski 1992 single work criticism ; Max and Murray Darryl Mason 1996 single work novel
About Books : China Matters Nicholas Jose , 1992 single work review
— Appears in: National Library of Australia News , September vol. 2 no. 12 1992; (p. 8-10)

— Review of Mates of Mars David Foster 1991 single work novel ; The Hole Through the Centre of the World : A Novel Kevin Brophy 1991 single work novel ; After China Brian Castro 1992 single work novel ; La Mort de Napoléon Simon Leys 1986 single work novel ; The Yellow Lady : Australian Impressions of Asia Alison Broinowski 1992 single work criticism ; The Ancestor Game Alex Miller 1992 single work novel
Asia's Reflection in Western Eyes Gungwu Wang , 1992 single work review
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 7 March 1992; (p. 45)

— Review of The Yellow Lady : Australian Impressions of Asia Alison Broinowski 1992 single work criticism
The Art of Identity Lenore Coltheart , 1992 single work review
— Appears in: The Advertiser Magazine , 7 March 1992; (p. 12)

— Review of The Yellow Lady : Australian Impressions of Asia Alison Broinowski 1992 single work criticism
A Light to Banish the Oriental Darkness Robin Gerster , 1992 single work review
— Appears in: The Age , 14 March 1992; (p. 9)

— Review of The Yellow Lady : Australian Impressions of Asia Alison Broinowski 1992 single work criticism
Coming to Terms with the Artistic Mystery of Asia Terry Narramore , 1992 single work review
— Appears in: The Saturday Mercury , 14 March 1992; (p. 20)

— Review of The Yellow Lady : Australian Impressions of Asia Alison Broinowski 1992 single work criticism
Racial Melancholia in Brian Castro’s Chinese-Australian Historical Fiction Hoa Pham , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Journal of Australian Writers and Writing , May no. 1 2010; (p. 65-72)
A Question with Many Answers Julianne Schultz , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: Griffith Review , Winter no. 36 2012; (p. 7-10)
Reading Asia : Musings of a Peripatetic Writer Satendra Nandan , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: Transnational Literature , May vol. 4 no. 2 2012;
Notes for a paper delivered at the National Conference of the Australian Association of Teaching English (ATTE) on the theme ‘Finding a Place for Falstaff’, Melbourne Cricket Ground, December 2011
Representing ‘the Other’ in the Fiction of Alex Miller Elizabeth Webby , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Novels of Alex Miller : An Introduction 2012; (p. 114-124)
'Alex Miller began publishing his novels in 1988 at the end of a period of intense debate in literary circles about the ethics of representation, a debate informed by feminism, multiculturalism and postcolonialism. Put crudely, the debate was about whether white, male writers from first-world countries, the dominant literary players up to this point, should continue to have open slather in writing about their others, i.e. those who were not white or male, now that these others were at last finding their voices and writing back.

In Australia, the debate was particularly focused on the question of white writers' representation of Aboriginals. Indeed, in 1979 I was told, after giving a conference paper on colonial poems about Aboriginals, that I was lucky there were no Aboriginals in the audience. But in feminist circles male appropriation of female voices was also a major issue. Although a total ban on representations of others would clearly have meant the end of fiction as we know it, these debates did draw attention to the stereotyped representations of women, Aboriginals, Chinese and other 'others' found in much earlier Australian writing.

When I first read Alex Miller, soon after The Ancestor Game was published in 1992, I was struck by the unusual empathy shown here for his female characters and their predicaments, as well as by his insightful depictions of people from other cultures. These have continued to be hallmarks of his fiction, with representations of 'otherness' also extending to animals, especially in The Tivington Nott and Landscape of Farewell. My paper, however, will have as its focus The Ancestor Game, Conditions of Faith and Lovesong.' (Author's abstract)
Images and Muses of Asia Alison Broinowski , 1992 single work column
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 7 March 1992; (p. 45)
Last amended 17 Feb 2005 09:28:37
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