AustLit logo
y separately published work icon The Letters of Rachel Henning selected work   correspondence   biography  
Issue Details: First known date: 1952... 1952 The Letters of Rachel Henning
The material on this page is available to AustLit subscribers. If you are a subscriber or are from a subscribing organisation, please log in to gain full access. To explore options for subscribing to this unique teaching, research, and publishing resource for Australian culture and storytelling, please contact us or find out more.

Latest Issues

Notes

  • Other formats: Also braille, sound recording.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Serialised by: The Bulletin 1880 periodical (6777 issues)
Notes:
Serialised in 23 parts between 8 August 1951 and 16 January 1952.
    • Sydney, New South Wales,: Bulletin , 1952 .
      Extent: 126p.
      Description: illus.
      Note/s:
      • Introduction by David Adams.
      • With forty pen-drawings by Norman Lindsay.
    • Harmondsworth, Middlesex,
      c
      England,
      c
      c
      United Kingdom (UK),
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Penguin ,
      1969 .
      Extent: 292p.
      Description: illus.
      Note/s:
      • Preface by David Adams and foreword by Norman Lindsay.
    • Ringwood, Ringwood - Croydon - Kilsyth area, Melbourne - East, Melbourne, Victoria,: Penguin , 1988 .
      Extent: 292p.
      Description: illus.
      Note/s:
      • Introduced by Dale Spender
      • Preface by David Adams and foreword by Norman Lindsay.
      ISBN: 0140120475 (pbk.)

Works about this Work

The Creation of Rachel Henning : Personal Correspondence to Publishing Phenomenon Bryony Cosgrove , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Literary Studies , October-November vol. 27 no. 3/4 2012; (p. 74-91)

'The Letters of Rachel Henning is the best-selling collection of correspondence ever published in Australia. Covering the years 1853 to 1882, the letters were first serialised in the Bulletin in 1951-1952 (edited by David Adams and illustrated by Norman LIndsay), nearly forty years after Rachel Henning's death. Since then, they have been published in book form in nine separate editions, and remained in print for nearly fifty years. In October 2006, the book was posted online, unillustrated, as a Project Gutenberg Australia title. I propose to discuss the editing of the original letters, and examine the paratexts and the various publishing strategies that allowed the collection to be marketed successfully, over many years, to a diverse readership whose reasons for finding the collection so appealing varied with the passage of time. (Author's introduction)

Genteel Pursuits in the Bush : Colonial Gentelwomen's Appreciation of Rural Australia in the Mid-Nineteen Century Ildikó Dömötör , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Zeitschrift fur Australienstudien , no. 25 2011; (p. 42-52)
'Female British settlers’ lives in colonial Australia anfd their recreational pursuits are discussed in this article. Many colonial women informed their home audience of the peculiarities of their new lives in their letters, diaries, memoirs and travel books. Women’s texts differ considerably from men’s accounts because their emphasis is on the depiction of private life, family relationships and domestic concerns. In addition, these ladies also sought to depict the Australian colonies in terms of their botanical and ethnographical diversity as well as their history and social development.' Source: www.bod.com/ (sighted 11/07/2012).
Of Intemperance, Class and Gender in Colonial Queensland : A Working-Class Woman's Account of Alcohol Abuse Howard Le Couteur , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: History Australia , vol. 8 no. 3 2011; (p. 139-157)
'Writings by working-class women are relatively rare in the historical record, especially for mid-nineteenth century Australia. The letters of Julia Cross to her mother in Ely, Cambridgeshire, are notable not just for the mundane matters they discuss, but for the unique insight they give to a woman trapped by her class and gender because of her husband's intemperate habits. In a hard-headed decision, Julia resolved to stay with her husband and live out the consequences. The letters graphically describe her struggle to provide the necessities of life for her family and the stresses of physically protecting her children when her husband was drunk. Julia is revealed as a hard-working and resourceful woman who was committed to giving her children the best she could. The letters give us access to one working-class woman's perspective on men's drinking, one that was certainly not the narrow vision of the domestic sphere associated with the middle class. Julia found spaces outside the domestic sphere in which to work for her family's benefit.' (Author's abstract)
Spot the Lady : Rachel Henning Finds Herself in the Bush Anne Lear , 2001 single work criticism
— Appears in: Women's Writing , vol. 8 no. 3 (p. 391-402)
Fabricating Texts of Empire Dorothy Jones , 1994 single work criticism
— Appears in: Kunapipi , vol. 16 no. 3 1994; (p. 1-16) A Kingdom and a Place of Exile : Critical Essays on Postcolonial Women's Writing 2010; (p. 82-95)
Untitled 1952 single work review
— Appears in: The Cairns Post , 11 October 1952; (p. 4)

— Review of The Letters of Rachel Henning Rachel Biddulph Henning , 1952 selected work correspondence biography
Lady Pioneer Thelma Herring , 1954 single work review
— Appears in: Southerly , vol. 15 no. 3 1954; (p. 193-195)

— Review of The Letters of Rachel Henning Rachel Biddulph Henning , 1952 selected work correspondence biography
In Wildest NSW M. H. Ellis , 1963 single work review
— Appears in: The Bulletin , 18 May vol. 85 no. 4344 1963; (p. 37)

— Review of The Letters of Rachel Henning Rachel Biddulph Henning , 1952 selected work correspondence biography
Untitled Nancy Keesing , 1964 single work review
— Appears in: Southerly , vol. 24 no. 1 1964; (p. 65-67)

— Review of The Letters of Rachel Henning Rachel Biddulph Henning , 1952 selected work correspondence biography ; Five Senses : Selected Poems Judith Wright , 1963 selected work poetry ; Poems Kenneth Slessor , 1957 selected work poetry ; The Madeleine Heritage Martin Mills , 1928 single work novel ; Capricornia : A Novel Xavier Herbert , 1938 single work novel ; The Young Desire It : A Novel Seaforth MacKenzie , 1937 single work novel
`Free and Easy' Letters from an Irish Botanist in Australia Robert Willson , 1989 single work review
— Appears in: The Canberra Times , 11 February 1989; (p. B4)

— Review of The Letters of Rachel Henning Rachel Biddulph Henning , 1952 selected work correspondence biography
Of Intemperance, Class and Gender in Colonial Queensland : A Working-Class Woman's Account of Alcohol Abuse Howard Le Couteur , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: History Australia , vol. 8 no. 3 2011; (p. 139-157)
'Writings by working-class women are relatively rare in the historical record, especially for mid-nineteenth century Australia. The letters of Julia Cross to her mother in Ely, Cambridgeshire, are notable not just for the mundane matters they discuss, but for the unique insight they give to a woman trapped by her class and gender because of her husband's intemperate habits. In a hard-headed decision, Julia resolved to stay with her husband and live out the consequences. The letters graphically describe her struggle to provide the necessities of life for her family and the stresses of physically protecting her children when her husband was drunk. Julia is revealed as a hard-working and resourceful woman who was committed to giving her children the best she could. The letters give us access to one working-class woman's perspective on men's drinking, one that was certainly not the narrow vision of the domestic sphere associated with the middle class. Julia found spaces outside the domestic sphere in which to work for her family's benefit.' (Author's abstract)
Genteel Pursuits in the Bush : Colonial Gentelwomen's Appreciation of Rural Australia in the Mid-Nineteen Century Ildikó Dömötör , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Zeitschrift fur Australienstudien , no. 25 2011; (p. 42-52)
'Female British settlers’ lives in colonial Australia anfd their recreational pursuits are discussed in this article. Many colonial women informed their home audience of the peculiarities of their new lives in their letters, diaries, memoirs and travel books. Women’s texts differ considerably from men’s accounts because their emphasis is on the depiction of private life, family relationships and domestic concerns. In addition, these ladies also sought to depict the Australian colonies in terms of their botanical and ethnographical diversity as well as their history and social development.' Source: www.bod.com/ (sighted 11/07/2012).
The Henning Letters Norman Lindsay , 1952 single work criticism biography
— Appears in: The Bulletin , 24 September vol. 73 no. 3789 1952; (p. 2)
Fabricating Texts of Empire Dorothy Jones , 1994 single work criticism
— Appears in: Kunapipi , vol. 16 no. 3 1994; (p. 1-16) A Kingdom and a Place of Exile : Critical Essays on Postcolonial Women's Writing 2010; (p. 82-95)
Spot the Lady : Rachel Henning Finds Herself in the Bush Anne Lear , 2001 single work criticism
— Appears in: Women's Writing , vol. 8 no. 3 (p. 391-402)
Last amended 25 Apr 2013 15:21:14
Newspapers:
    Powered by Trove
    X