6832500928209177307.jpg
http://www.middlemiss.org via Wikipedia
y Blueback single work   children's fiction   children's  
Issue Details: First known date: 1997... 1997 Blueback
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'Abel Jackson loves to dive. He's a natural in the water. He can't remember a time when he couldn't use a mask and snorkel to glide down into the clear deep. Life is tough out at Longboat Bay. Every day the boy helps his mother earn their living from the sea and the land. It's hard work but Abel has the bush and the sky and the bay to himself. Until the day he meets Blueback, the fish that changes his life. An ecological novel on a boy who protects a fish from property developers and rapacious fishermen. The boy befriends the fish, a blue grouper while diving for abalone, his family's trade. Blueback is about people learning from nature.' (Source: Trove)

Exhibitions

9632061
7720721

Adaptations

Blueback Peta Murray , 2005 single work drama

Teaching Resources

This work has teaching resources.

Notes

  • Included in the 1998 White Raven's Catalogue compiled by the International Youth Library in Munich, Germany. Special mention.
  • Other formats: Also braille, sound recording, large print.

Affiliation Notes

  • This work is affiliated with the AustLit subset Asian-Australian Children's Literature and Publishing because it has a Japanese translation.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • New York (City), New York (State),
      c
      United States of America (USA),
      c
      Americas,
      :
      Scribner ,
      1997 .
      5135016684596874894.jpg
      This image has been sourced from online.
      Extent: 95p.
      Note/s:
      • With subtitle: A Contemporary Fable
      ISBN: 0684845652 (alk. paper)
      • Publisher: Pan
      Sydney,: Pan , 1997 .
      8572328680138660233.jpg
      Cover image courtesy of publisher.
      Extent: 151p.
      Reprinted: 1997 , 1998 , 1999 , 2000
      ISBN: 0330360388 (pbk.)
    • South Melbourne, South Melbourne - Port Melbourne area, Melbourne - Inner South, Melbourne, Victoria,: Macmillan , 1997 .
      6832500928209177307.jpg
      http://www.middlemiss.org via Wikipedia
      Extent: 151p.
      Description: illus.
      Note/s:
      • With subtitle: A Fable for All Ages
      ISBN: 0732909120
    • London,
      c
      England,
      c
      c
      United Kingdom (UK),
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Picador ,
      1998 .
      Extent: 151p.
      Description: illus.
      ISBN: 0330369792
    • Melbourne, Victoria,: Bolinda , 1998 .
      Extent: 147p.
      ISBN: 1864422378
    • Chippendale, Inner Sydney, Sydney,: Picador , 1999 .
      Extent: 151p.
      ISBN: 0330361627
    • Melbourne, Victoria,: Penguin Books , 2014 .
      Extent: 1vp.
      Note/s:
      • Published July 2014
      ISBN: 9781743484241 (ebook)
Language: Italian
    • Rome,
      c
      Italy,
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Fazi ,
      1998 .
      Extent: 122p.
      Description: illus.
      Reprinted: 2003
      ISBN: 8881120844

Works about this Work

Australia : An Inescapable Cultural Paradigm? Cross- and Transcultural Elements in Tim Winton’s Fiction Tomasz Gadzina , 2016 single work criticism
— Appears in: Journal of the European Association for Studies on Australia , vol. 7 no. 2 2016; (p. 30-40)
'The article considers Tim Winton’s fiction in terms of its cross- and transcultural character. Despite the fact that local Australian settings permeate the writer’s narratives, Winton creates an imaginary space that is both local and transnational in terms of its quality of the domestic culture, which Winton extends beyond its original field of practice. Winton achieves the transcultural quality of his fiction through transgressions and boundary breaking that are possible due to his frequent reworking of the traditional Australian themes and concepts of the unknown, supernatural, mystical, numinous and sacred, exploitation of leitmotifs of journey, transit and in-betweenness, use of cross-cultural symbols as well as various utopian and dystopian topoi such as Arcadia and Heimat.' (Publication abstract)
On Focuses on the Oceans' Ecology Reveled in Tim Winton's Main Literature Works Hong-Bo Du , 2014 single work criticism
— Appears in: Journal of Xihua University , no. 6 2014; (p. 53-55)
'Descriptions and focuses on ocean is a necessary part of the development of Australian literature, on which the world famous Australian writer Tim Winton is considered as one of the representatives. This thesis is mainly to introduce Tim Winton and his representative works which focus on the ocean; the author lists the most influential works of Tim Winton in order to present the common as well as the ecological concept of environmental protection reflected in his works.' (Publication abstract)
Aussie Books for Aussie Kids 2014 single work review
— Appears in: Good Reading , September 2014; (p. 65)

— Review of Bilby Moon Margaret Spurling 2000 single work picture book ; Good Dog Hank Jackie French 2015 single work picture book ; Frank Davies and the Amazing Frog Catapult Rohan Clifford 2014 single work children's fiction ; Loyal Creatures Morris Gleitzman 2014 single work children's fiction ; I Am Juliet Jackie French 2014 single work children's fiction ; Blueback Tim Winton 1997 single work children's fiction ; Jamie Brown Is NOT Rich Adam Wallace 2014 single work children's fiction
Water Bill Ashcroft , 2014 single work criticism
— Appears in: Tim Winton : Critical Essays 2014; (p. 16-48)

'In Dirt Music, remembering the time before a car crash took the lives of his brother Darkie, Darkie's wife Sal, and their two children, Bird and Bullet, Luther Fox recalls Bird's question : 'Lu, how come water lets you through it?' Bird is the one who saw God, and 'if anyone saw God it would likely be her. Bird's the nearest thing to an angelic being.' Bird's question suggests the function of water in Winton's novels. Water is everywhere in his writing, as people sail on it, dive into it, live on the edge of it. Clearly the sea and the river are vital aspects of the writer's own experience. But water is more than an omnipresent feature of his writing and his life, the oceanscape of his stories. It is something that 'lets you through'. It lets you through because it is the passage to a different state of being, sometimes in dream, sometimes in physical extremity, but always offers itself as the medium of transformation. When it lets you through - whether to escape to a different life, as a rite of passage to adulthood, to see the world in a new way or to discover the holiness of the earth or the wonder of the world, whether it is the baptismal water of redemption to an opening to a world of silence - and it is all these things- you become different.' (Author's introduction 16)

Fear, Voice, and the Environment in Sonya Hartnett's Forest and The Midnight Zoo Lesley Hawkes , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Papers : Explorations Into Children's Literature , vol. 21 no. 1 2011; (p. 67-76)
'Subtle is not a word that is normally associated with Sonya Hartnett's style. Rather, she is known for her stark, bold approach. However, when it comes to the Australian environment, Hartnett is indeed subtle in her approach. Hartnett has set in play a new, almost posthumanist style of writing about the nonhuman. The Australian landscape and environment has always figured prominently in Australian literature for both adults and children but Hartnett has taken this writing in a totally different direction. This article looks at two of Hartnett's novels, Forest and The Midnight Zoo, and examines how Hartnett offers new and exciting avenues of thought regarding the place of humans in that environment.' (Author's abstract)
Untitled Kevin Steinberger , 1998 single work review
— Appears in: Reading Time : The Journal of the Children's Book Council of Australia , vol. 42 no. 1 1998; (p. 23-24)

— Review of Blueback Tim Winton 1997 single work children's fiction
Untitled Helen Purdie , 1998 single work review
— Appears in: Magpies : Talking About Books for Children , March vol. 13 no. 1 1998; (p. 36)

— Review of Blueback Tim Winton 1997 single work children's fiction
In Short : Fiction Kerryn Goldsworthy , 2009 single work review
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 14-15 February 2009; (p. 30)

— Review of Blueback Tim Winton 1997 single work children's fiction ; Wrong Way, Go Back Alli Kincaid 2009 single work novel ; The Family Tree Ilsa Evans 2009 single work novel
Kids' Lit Rosemary Neill , 2009 single work review
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 28 February - 1 March 2009; (p. 10)

— Review of Blueback Tim Winton 1997 single work children's fiction ; The Remarkable Secret of Aurelie Bonhoffen Deborah Abela 2009 single work children's fiction
Reading and Viewing : Sustainability Texts Deborah McPherson , 2011 single work review
— Appears in: English in Australia , vol. 46 no. 2 2011; (p. 93-94)

— Review of Blueback Tim Winton 1997 single work children's fiction
A Look at... Tim Winton's Places and People 1998 single work interview
— Appears in: Magpies : Talking About Books for Children , July vol. 13 no. 3 1998; (p. 20-21)
y Mind the Country : Tim Winton's Fiction Salhia Ben-Messahel , Crawley : University of Western Australia , 2006 Z1286107 2006 single work criticism
Fear, Voice, and the Environment in Sonya Hartnett's Forest and The Midnight Zoo Lesley Hawkes , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Papers : Explorations Into Children's Literature , vol. 21 no. 1 2011; (p. 67-76)
'Subtle is not a word that is normally associated with Sonya Hartnett's style. Rather, she is known for her stark, bold approach. However, when it comes to the Australian environment, Hartnett is indeed subtle in her approach. Hartnett has set in play a new, almost posthumanist style of writing about the nonhuman. The Australian landscape and environment has always figured prominently in Australian literature for both adults and children but Hartnett has taken this writing in a totally different direction. This article looks at two of Hartnett's novels, Forest and The Midnight Zoo, and examines how Hartnett offers new and exciting avenues of thought regarding the place of humans in that environment.' (Author's abstract)
Winton Revealed Murray Waldren , 1997 single work criticism biography
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 25-26 October 1997; (p. rev 26) Dining Out with Mr Lunch 1999; (p. 96-101)
Water Bill Ashcroft , 2014 single work criticism
— Appears in: Tim Winton : Critical Essays 2014; (p. 16-48)

'In Dirt Music, remembering the time before a car crash took the lives of his brother Darkie, Darkie's wife Sal, and their two children, Bird and Bullet, Luther Fox recalls Bird's question : 'Lu, how come water lets you through it?' Bird is the one who saw God, and 'if anyone saw God it would likely be her. Bird's the nearest thing to an angelic being.' Bird's question suggests the function of water in Winton's novels. Water is everywhere in his writing, as people sail on it, dive into it, live on the edge of it. Clearly the sea and the river are vital aspects of the writer's own experience. But water is more than an omnipresent feature of his writing and his life, the oceanscape of his stories. It is something that 'lets you through'. It lets you through because it is the passage to a different state of being, sometimes in dream, sometimes in physical extremity, but always offers itself as the medium of transformation. When it lets you through - whether to escape to a different life, as a rite of passage to adulthood, to see the world in a new way or to discover the holiness of the earth or the wonder of the world, whether it is the baptismal water of redemption to an opening to a world of silence - and it is all these things- you become different.' (Author's introduction 16)

Awards

Last amended 15 Sep 2017 08:55:28
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