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y separately published work icon Jim and Wally single work   children's fiction   children's  
Is part of Billabong Books Mary Grant Bruce , 1910-1942 series - author children's fiction (number 5 in series)
Issue Details: First known date: 1916... 1916 Jim and Wally
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'Overcome by toxic enemy gas in the muddy trenches of Flanders, Jim and Wally are sent to hospital in London.  Mr Linton and Norah whisk them off to recuperate in the clean air and safety of Ireland – via a hazardous crossing of the Irish Sea.

'Ireland entrances them, and catching trout thrills them as they fish the lochs.  They encounter a crippled man who turns out to be a delightful wealthy landowner only too glad of their company.  They go touring the countryside with him, experiencing life in the villages and being enthralled by his knowledge and stories of old Ireland.

'Car troubles strand them at a seaside village for a few days, where the boys discover a sea cave with a hidden cache of fuel tins indicating the proximity of a German submarine. Risky plans are set afoot for enemy capture.  They succeed, but at great cost.'  (Publication summary)

Exhibitions

7553513
7457004

Works about this Work

y separately published work icon From Colonial to Modern: Transnational Girlhood in Canadian, Australian, and New Zealand Children's Literature, 1840-1940 Michelle J. Smith , Kristine Moruzi , Clare Bradford , Toronto : University of Toronto Press , 2018 15039944 2018 multi chapter work criticism

'Through a comparison of Canadian, Australian, and New Zealand texts published between 1840 and 1940, From Colonial to Modern develops a new history of colonial girlhoods revealing how girlhood in each of these emerging nations reflects a unique political, social, and cultural context.

'Print culture was central to the definition, and redefinition, of colonial girlhood during this period of rapid change. Models of girlhood are shared between settler colonies and contain many similar attitudes towards family, the natural world, education, employment, modernity, and race, yet, as the authors argue, these texts also reveal different attitudes that emerged out of distinct colonial experiences. Unlike the imperial model representing the British ideal, the transnational girl is an adaptation of British imperial femininity and holds, for example, a unique perception of Indigenous culture and imperialism. Drawing on fiction, girls’ magazines, and school magazine, the authors shine a light on neglected corners of the literary histories of these three nations and strengthen our knowledge of femininity in white settler colonies.'  (Publication summary)

“Whichever and Whatever It Was” : Rendering War and Peace in Australian WWI Narratives Clare Rhoden , 2016 single work essay
— Appears in: Long Paddock , vol. 75 no. 3 2016;
'Australian narratives of World War I (WWI) reflect a different but characteristic commemoration of that event. While the best (to modern eyes) novels of WWI present a comprehensive picture of disillusionment, futility and waste, Australian stories proffer the view that the war was worthwhile, and that the sacrifices of the Anzacs were honourable and justified. In placing WWI as a salient marker denoting the origin of the nation, Australian texts diverge from the revered WWI canon’s convincing portrayal of the war as a symbol of civilisation’s demise. Even accepting this divergence, however, there is much in Australian narratives that amplifies the memorialisation of the war in Australian society.' (Introduction)
Britishness and Australian Popular Fiction : From the Mid-Nineteenth to the Mid-Twentieth Centuries Hsu-Ming Teo , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: Sold by the Millions : Australia's Bestsellers 2012; (p. 46-66)
'The analysis offered here is [...], a panoptic perspective of the tangled skeins of literary imagination and imitation, gender and genre requirements, editorial control, market considerations and the sheer economics of the international book trade that knotted Australian popular literature into the cultural and economic fabric of the British empire.' (47)
Attitudes to War in Australian Children's Literature Anne M. O'Sullivan , 1994 single work criticism
— Appears in: Papers : Explorations into Children's Literature , April vol. 5 no. 1 1994; (p. 34-48)
O'Sullivan seeks to 'identify attitudes to war in Australian children's literature' in the period 1914-1994, noting in particular the movement from identification with Britain and the Empire in the early decades of this period to an affinity with Asia and the Pacific in the latter decades (34). The discussion begins with a literature review of Australian and overseas critical research in this field and then surveys a large number of (mainly Australian) novels with war as the central/pivotal theme. O'Sullivan concludes that there has been a change in attitudes to war in Australian children's literature, whereby 'once Australia was part of the British Empire and prepared to fight for that anywhere in the world, now multicultural Australia takes a broader view and sees herself as part of a global family' (47).
y separately published work icon War, Women and the Bush : The Novels of Mary Grant Bruce and Ethel Turner David Robert Walker , St Lucia : AustLit: The Australian Literature Resource , 2009 Z962022 1978 single work criticism Comments on the portrayal of women, men and the bush in the novels of Mary Grant Bruce and Ethel Turner which were set during World War I. Walker draws particular attention to the disadvantages of being a woman and the qualities a woman should possess as portrayed in these novels. In their general behaviour, the characters of both sexes in the novels are permitted to be 'mildly unconventional' provided they still abide by the major social conventions of 'loyalty, decency [and] fair play'. Walker also points out the manner in which the bush is clearly depicted as a superior living environment, 'enhancing good health and wholesome attitudes to authority' and negating the 'socially harmful behaviour' engendered by life in the city.
Britishness and Australian Popular Fiction : From the Mid-Nineteenth to the Mid-Twentieth Centuries Hsu-Ming Teo , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: Sold by the Millions : Australia's Bestsellers 2012; (p. 46-66)
'The analysis offered here is [...], a panoptic perspective of the tangled skeins of literary imagination and imitation, gender and genre requirements, editorial control, market considerations and the sheer economics of the international book trade that knotted Australian popular literature into the cultural and economic fabric of the British empire.' (47)
Attitudes to War in Australian Children's Literature Anne M. O'Sullivan , 1994 single work criticism
— Appears in: Papers : Explorations into Children's Literature , April vol. 5 no. 1 1994; (p. 34-48)
O'Sullivan seeks to 'identify attitudes to war in Australian children's literature' in the period 1914-1994, noting in particular the movement from identification with Britain and the Empire in the early decades of this period to an affinity with Asia and the Pacific in the latter decades (34). The discussion begins with a literature review of Australian and overseas critical research in this field and then surveys a large number of (mainly Australian) novels with war as the central/pivotal theme. O'Sullivan concludes that there has been a change in attitudes to war in Australian children's literature, whereby 'once Australia was part of the British Empire and prepared to fight for that anywhere in the world, now multicultural Australia takes a broader view and sees herself as part of a global family' (47).
y separately published work icon War, Women and the Bush : The Novels of Mary Grant Bruce and Ethel Turner David Robert Walker , St Lucia : AustLit: The Australian Literature Resource , 2009 Z962022 1978 single work criticism Comments on the portrayal of women, men and the bush in the novels of Mary Grant Bruce and Ethel Turner which were set during World War I. Walker draws particular attention to the disadvantages of being a woman and the qualities a woman should possess as portrayed in these novels. In their general behaviour, the characters of both sexes in the novels are permitted to be 'mildly unconventional' provided they still abide by the major social conventions of 'loyalty, decency [and] fair play'. Walker also points out the manner in which the bush is clearly depicted as a superior living environment, 'enhancing good health and wholesome attitudes to authority' and negating the 'socially harmful behaviour' engendered by life in the city.
“Whichever and Whatever It Was” : Rendering War and Peace in Australian WWI Narratives Clare Rhoden , 2016 single work essay
— Appears in: Long Paddock , vol. 75 no. 3 2016;
'Australian narratives of World War I (WWI) reflect a different but characteristic commemoration of that event. While the best (to modern eyes) novels of WWI present a comprehensive picture of disillusionment, futility and waste, Australian stories proffer the view that the war was worthwhile, and that the sacrifices of the Anzacs were honourable and justified. In placing WWI as a salient marker denoting the origin of the nation, Australian texts diverge from the revered WWI canon’s convincing portrayal of the war as a symbol of civilisation’s demise. Even accepting this divergence, however, there is much in Australian narratives that amplifies the memorialisation of the war in Australian society.' (Introduction)
y separately published work icon From Colonial to Modern: Transnational Girlhood in Canadian, Australian, and New Zealand Children's Literature, 1840-1940 Michelle J. Smith , Kristine Moruzi , Clare Bradford , Toronto : University of Toronto Press , 2018 15039944 2018 multi chapter work criticism

'Through a comparison of Canadian, Australian, and New Zealand texts published between 1840 and 1940, From Colonial to Modern develops a new history of colonial girlhoods revealing how girlhood in each of these emerging nations reflects a unique political, social, and cultural context.

'Print culture was central to the definition, and redefinition, of colonial girlhood during this period of rapid change. Models of girlhood are shared between settler colonies and contain many similar attitudes towards family, the natural world, education, employment, modernity, and race, yet, as the authors argue, these texts also reveal different attitudes that emerged out of distinct colonial experiences. Unlike the imperial model representing the British ideal, the transnational girl is an adaptation of British imperial femininity and holds, for example, a unique perception of Indigenous culture and imperialism. Drawing on fiction, girls’ magazines, and school magazine, the authors shine a light on neglected corners of the literary histories of these three nations and strengthen our knowledge of femininity in white settler colonies.'  (Publication summary)

Last amended 12 Mar 2018 12:54:50
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