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Issue Details: First known date: 1916... 1916 Sister Sorrow : A Story of Australian Life
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Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Works about this Work

'The One Jarring Note' : Race and Gender in Queensland Women's Writing to 1939 Belinda McKay , 2001 single work criticism
— Appears in: Queensland Review , May vol. 8 no. 1 2001; (p. 31-54)

'The literary production of women in Queensland from Separation to World War II records and reflects on various aspects of colonial life and Australian nationhood in a period when white women's participation in public life and letters was steadily increasing. Unease with the colonial experience underpins many of the key themes of this body of work: the difficulty of finding a literary voice in a new land, a conflicted sense of place, the linking of masculinity with violence, and the promotion of racial purity. This chapter will explore how white women writers – for there were no published Indigenous women writers in this era – responded to the conditions of living and writing in Queensland prior to the social and cultural changes initiated by World War II.' (Extract)
Rewriting Desire: Rosa Praed, Theosophy and the Sex Problem Kay Ferres , 1993 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Time to Write : Australian Women Writers 1890-1930 1993; (p. 238-255)
Rewriting Desire: Rosa Praed, Theosophy and the Sex Problem Kay Ferres , 1993 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Time to Write : Australian Women Writers 1890-1930 1993; (p. 238-255)
'The One Jarring Note' : Race and Gender in Queensland Women's Writing to 1939 Belinda McKay , 2001 single work criticism
— Appears in: Queensland Review , May vol. 8 no. 1 2001; (p. 31-54)

'The literary production of women in Queensland from Separation to World War II records and reflects on various aspects of colonial life and Australian nationhood in a period when white women's participation in public life and letters was steadily increasing. Unease with the colonial experience underpins many of the key themes of this body of work: the difficulty of finding a literary voice in a new land, a conflicted sense of place, the linking of masculinity with violence, and the promotion of racial purity. This chapter will explore how white women writers – for there were no published Indigenous women writers in this era – responded to the conditions of living and writing in Queensland prior to the social and cultural changes initiated by World War II.' (Extract)
Last amended 30 Jun 2017 11:22:27
Subjects:
  • Curtis Island, Gladstone area, Maryborough - Rockhampton area, Queensland,
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