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Elizabeth Webby Elizabeth Webby i(A6186 works by) (birth name: Elizabeth Loder) (a.k.a. Elizabeth Anne Webby)
Also writes as: Elizabeth Loder
Born: Established: 1942 ;
Gender: Female
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Works By

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1 Elizabeth Webby Review of Adrian Mitchell, Where Shadows Have Fallen : The Descent of Henry Kendall Elizabeth Webby , 2022 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Journal of Biography and History , no. 6 2022; (p. 281-284)

— Review of Where Shadows Have Fallen : The Descent of Henry Kendall Adrian Mitchell , 2020 single work biography
'Since his retirement from the University of Sydney, Adrian Mitchell has remained busy writing biographies of a wide range of people. Some of them have been well known, like the early explorer William Dampier, others little known, such as the late nineteenth-century landscape painter George Collingridge de Tourcey. The subject of his latest work, nineteenth-century Australian poet Henry Kendall, falls somewhere in the middle. For many years his poems, especially ‘Bell Birds’, were widely known and recited by generations of schoolchildren. Now he and his work are largely forgotten.' (Introduction)
1 Alex Miller. Max Elizabeth Webby , 2021 single work review
— Appears in: JASAL , vol. 21 no. 2 2021;

— Review of Max Alex Miller , 2020 single work biography
1 “Proud of Contributing Its Quota to the Original Literature of the Colony” : An Introduction to Eliza Hamilton Dunlop and Her Writing Anna Johnston , Elizabeth Webby , 2021 single work criticism
— Appears in: Eliza Hamilton Dunlop : Writing from the Colonial Frontier 2021;
1 y separately published work icon Eliza Hamilton Dunlop : Writing from the Colonial Frontier Anna Johnston (editor), Elizabeth Webby (editor), Sydney : Sydney University Press , 2021 21649381 2021 anthology criticism poetry

'Eliza Hamilton Dunlop (1796–1880) arrived in Sydney in 1838 and became almost immediately notorious for her poem “The Aboriginal Mother,” written in response to the infamous Myall Creek massacre. She published more poetry in colonial newspapers during her lifetime, but for the century following her death her work was largely neglected. In recent years, however, critical interest in Dunlop has increased, in Australia and internationally and in a range of fields, including literary studies; settler, postcolonial and imperial studies; and Indigenous studies.

'This stimulating collection of essays by leading scholars considers Dunlop's work from a range of perspectives and includes a new selection of her poetry.'

Source: Publisher's blurb.

1 Review of Locating Australian Literary Memory, by Brigid Magner Elizabeth Webby , 2020 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Literary Studies , 29 October vol. 35 no. 2 2020;

— Review of Locating Australian Literary Memory Brigid Magner , 2019 multi chapter work criticism

'Locating Australian Literary Memory begins with a typically pithy quotation from Miles Franklin about its subject matter: ‘Such monuments, alas, too often are a saving of face by the living in regard to the neglected dead’. Many of the eleven Australian writers focused on by Brigid Magner were indeed neglected during their lifetimes, and most, even if achieving popularity at one time, are little read today. They include a number whose work would still be regarded as canonical, such as Joseph Furphy, Henry Handel Richardson, Henry Lawson, ‘Banjo’ Paterson, Katharine Susannah Prichard and Eleanor Dark, along with two best-known for their books for children, Nan Chauncy and P. L. Travers. Novelist Kylie Tennant, Indigenous author David Unaipon and poet Adam Lindsay Gordon make up the rest of the group, all of whom were writing mainly in the nineteenth through to the mid-twentieth centuries.' (Publication abstract)

1 Love for Our Child’s Child Elizabeth Webby , 2020 single work review
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 25 April 2020; (p. 16)

— Review of Grandmothers : Essays by 21st-century Grandmothers 2020 anthology autobiography ; A Lasting Conversation : Stories on Ageing 2020 anthology short story prose

'The past month has attracted more attention to older Australians, positive and negative, as those most at risk from the coronavirus. As the editors of these two anthologies note, people, especially women, have usually faded into the background once they reached old age.' (Introduction)

1 [Review] A World of Fiction: Digital Collections and the Future of Literary History Elizabeth Webby , 2018 single work review
— Appears in: Script and Print , vol. 42 no. 3 2018; (p. 183-188)

— Review of A World of Fiction : Digital Collections and the Future of Literary History Katherine Bode , 2018 single work criticism
'So begins a journey of looking for the lost by learning from the Register about printed texts that no longer survive. Hill offers several examples of how the Register has informed research before revealing her own findings. A set of four chapters explores five different popular genres. One chapter is dedicated to ballads, many of which (even with the determination of some very enthusiastic collectors) have been lost; and this, despite ballads, of entertainment and news, making up nearly 43% of all entries in the Stationers’ Company Register in the 1560s (35). Another chapter is dedicated to news. This is an excellent contribution as many projects investigating printed news have focused primarily on foreign news. Hill’s work unpacks a “number of news markets in early modern England, both for publishers and consumers,” including “foreign news, domestic news, supernatural tales, serial publications and single-issue news items” (100). A third chapter examines religious print, acknowledging the complexities of such publishing in a period of religious upheaval (130). The last genres explored are those of learning and leisure. These two rich veins of enquiry are handled well and illustrate “the variety of print available for early modern readers in England” (166).' (Introduction)
1 [Review] Loving Words : Love Letters of Nettie and Vance Palmer, 1909-1914 Elizabeth Webby , 2018 single work review
— Appears in: Southerly , vol. 78 no. 2 2018; (p. 197-201)

— Review of Loving Words : Letters of Nettie and Vance Palmer, 1909 - 1914 Nettie Palmer , Vance Palmer , 2017 single work correspondence
'The Palmer Papers are one of the largest collections of Australian literary manuscripts currently preserved in the National Library of Australia. While they have been consulted by many researchers over the years, no one perhaps knows their contents as well as Deborah Jordan. In Loving Words, she introduces us to a less well-known aspect of the lives of Nettie and Vance Palmer: their lengthy courtship by correspondence. Given the major role the Palmers were to play in the development of Australian literature from the 1920s to 1960s, it is fascinating to learn how their personal and professional partnership began.' (Introduction)
1 Review of Colonial Australian Fiction: Character Types, Social Formations and the Colonial Economy, by Ken Gelder and Rachael Weaver Elizabeth Webby , 2018 single work essay
— Appears in: Australian Literary Studies , February vol. 33 no. 1 2018;

— Review of Colonial Australian Fiction : Character Types, Social Formations and the Colonial Economy Ken Gelder , Rachael Weaver , 2017 multi chapter work criticism

'Over the past decade, Ken Gelder and Rachael Weaver have been researching nineteenth-century Australian popular fiction with the aid of a succession of research grants. Associated publications have included a series of genre-based anthologies of gothic, romance, adventure and crime stories, as well as a selection of extracts from the local journals in which many of these stories were first published. While these books included introductions by Gelder and Weaver, Colonial Australian Fiction is their most sustained account of the field.' (Introduction)

1 Sydney in the Fiction of Elizabeth Harrower Elizabeth Webby , 2017 single work criticism
— Appears in: Elizabeth Harrower : Critical Essays 2017; (p. 28-37)
'The recent publication by Text of two new works by Elizabeth Harrower, along with their reissuing of all her earlier novels, some out of print for over fifty years, provides an ideal opportunity to study the development of various themes and preoccupations in her fiction. I have chosen here to focus on her fictional representations of Australia and Australians, and in particular how the city of Sydney, where she has spent most of her life, figures in her work. The previous difficulty of accessing Harrower’s novels has, no doubt, been one of the reasons why they have received little detailed critical study. Most essays published to date have discussed The Watch Tower (1966), using a variety of perspectives but rarely mentioning its Sydney setting. In 1990, when editor of Southerly, I published an essay on Down in the City (1957) by Rosie Yeo, based on her Honours thesis which I had supervised, to draw attention to this then largely forgotten novel. While the differences in class and attitude of those who live in various parts of Sydney are especially important in this novel, the city appears in all of Harrower’s works, even those not primarily set there.' (Introduction)
1 Editors' Introduction Elizabeth Webby , Graham Tulloch , 2017 single work essay
— Appears in: Humanities Australia , no. 8 2017; (p. 4-5)

'Once again it is a pleasure to welcome readers to a new issue of Humanities Australia and a sample of the outstanding research and writing being carried out by Australian humanities scholars. While the contributors to this issue come from a broad range of the disciplines represented in the Academy, including linguistics, philosophy, the arts, history and Asian studies, some common themes have emerged, especially in relation to questions of human rights, both in the past and today.' (Introduction)

1 [Review] Yarn Spinners Elizabeth Webby , 2017 single work review
— Appears in: Southerly , vol. 77 no. 1 2017; (p. 236-240)

— Review of Yarn Spinners : A Story in Letters : Dymphna Cusack, Florence James, Miles Franklin Dymphna Cusack , Miles Franklin , Florence James , 2001 anthology correspondence biography

'Yarn Spinners was first published by the University of Queensland Press in 2001 with the much shorter subtitle of ' A Story of Letters'. Coming after over a decade of increased attention to the lives and work of Austrlai's earlier women writers, thanks to the impact of femenist literary history and criticism, it was perhaps less necessary then to spell out just what the story was about. In epilogue Marilla North noted some ofthe fruits of the revival of interest in cusack work. Her play Morning Sacrifice (1943) was about to be produced by the Sydney Theatre Company and there was to be a reprint of her novel Say No to Death (1951). During the 1988 Bicentenary there had been reprints of the novels she wrote with Miles Franklin, Pioneers on Parade (1939), and Florence James, Come in Spinner (1951). Many of the letters in Yarn Spinners relate to the writing and publication of these two jointly- authored works. Today, while some of Cusack's novels can be ordered from Allen and Unwin as print on demand titles, they are not readliy available in bookshops, and she has been largley forgotten again.' (Introduction)

1 Newspapers and Journals Linda Crowl , Susan Fisher , Elizabeth Webby , Lydia Wevers , 2017 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Oxford History of the Novel in English : The Novel in Australia, Canada, New Zealand, and the South Pacific Since 1950 2017; (p. 527-543)

'Literary journalism in Australia, Canada, New Zealand, and the South Pacific varies according to the populations, histories, and communications infrastructure of each location...' (Introduction)

1 The Short Story in Australia Elizabeth Webby , 2017 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Oxford History of the Novel in English : The Novel in Australia, Canada, New Zealand, and the South Pacific Since 1950 2017; (p. 269-283)

'Australia, like other white settler countries, has a long tradition of short story writing dating back to the mid-nineteenth century. In the days when Australian novels were mainly published in England, but a strong local newspaper and magazine culture was beginning to develop, many authors turned to the short story to achieve some income...' (Introduction)

1 [Review] Wild Bleak Bohemia: Marcus Clarke, Adam Lindsay Gordon and Henry Kendall. A Documentary Elizabeth Webby , 2016 single work review
— Appears in: JASAL , vol. 16 no. 1 2016;

— Review of Wild Bleak Bohemia : Marcus Clarke, Adam Lindsay Gordon and Henry Kendall - A Documentary Michael Wilding , 2014 single work biography
1 Editor's Introduction Elizabeth Webby , 2016 single work essay
— Appears in: Humanities Australia , no. 7 2016;

'Welcome to the 2016 edition of Humanities Australia which again aims to present a small sample of the outstanding research and writing being carried out by humanities scholars and arts practitioners in Australia and internationally. Several of the essays this year deal with interactions between the human and natural worlds, involving the hunting and collecting of animals and insects, across various times and cultures. Others deal with the hunting and collecting of information, whether in fifteenth-century Florence or contemporary Australia. This remains an essential part of humanities scholarship despite the vast difference between an illuminated manuscript and a computer database.' (Introduction)

1 The Evidence of the Archive Margaret Harris , Elizabeth Webby , 2015 single work criticism
— Appears in: Patrick White beyond the Grave : New Critical Perspectives 2015; (p. 17-34)

'Harris and Webby give an overview of the newly discovered notebooks and manuscripts enhanced by their long experience researching White's writing, and their thorough examination of the 'new' collection's breadth and scope.' (Introduction 7)

1 Literary Awards and Joan London’s The Golden Age Elizabeth Webby , 2015 single work column
— Appears in: The Conversation , 23 July 2015;
1 Review : David Syme Elizabeth Webby , 2015 single work review
— Appears in: Journal of the Royal Australian Historical Society , June vol. 101 no. 1 2015; (p. 101-102)

— Review of David Syme : Man of the Age Elizabeth Morrison , 2014 single work biography
1 Editor's Introduction Elizabeth Webby , 2015 single work essay
— Appears in: Humanities Australia , no. 6 2015; (p. 4-5)
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