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Stephen Measday Stephen Measday i(A18481 works by) (a.k.a. Stephen John Cleveland Measday)
Born: Established: 1950 ;
Gender: Male
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BiographyHistory

Measday's professional career began as a cadet journalist with the Australian Broadcasting Corporation, where he worked as a reporter, sub-editor and news director. He was an ABC/freelance journalist (1969-1978); co-editor of Stelarc (1976) and Administrator/Production Manager of the Troupe Theatre Company (1978-1979). He then became a freelance writer. Measday wrote for both adults and children in film, television and radio, and worked for three series as script editor on the Logie Award-winning Channel 9 program, HI 5. He also wrote for Australia's highest rating drama, Blue Heelers, the adaptation of the Paul Jennings/Morris Gleitzman books, Wicked, the 10 network children's series, Mirror and Mirror 2, ABC TV's The Ferals, Channel 9's Ship to Shore; as well as an original telefeature, The Time Game; and the ACTF series, Skytrackers 2. His novels have been published in Australia, the United States, France, the United Kingdom, Indonesia and South Korea. Measday conducted a range of workshops, talks and readings throughout Australia for primary, secondary and tertiary students as well as adult groups. He also taught scriptwriting at the University of Western Sydney.

Most Referenced Works

Awards for Works

form y separately published work icon Blue Heelers ( dir. Mark Callan et. al. )agent 1994 Sydney Australia : Hal McElroy Southern Star Seven Network , 1994-2006 Z1367353 1994 series - publisher film/TV crime

A character-based television drama series about the lives of police officers in the fictitious Australian country town of Mt Thomas, this series began with the arrival of Constable Maggie Doyle (Lisa McCune) to the Mt Thomas station in the episode 'A Woman's Place'. Doyle and avuncular station boss Senior Sergeant Tom Croydon (John Wood) were the core characters of the series until the departure of Lisa McCune.

Immensely popular for a decade, Blue Heelers was cancelled in 2006 after thirteen seasons. The announcement was front-page news in Australia's major newspapers including The Sydney Morning Herald, Sydney's Daily Telegraph, The Herald Sun and The Age in Melbourne, and Brisbane's Courier Mail.

On June 8, 2006 Ross Warneke wrote in The Age:

'It's over and, to be perfectly blunt, there's no use lamenting the demise of Blue Heelers any more. When the final movie-length episode aired on Channel Seven on Sunday night, 1.5 million Australians tuned in, a figure that was big enough to give the show a win in its timeslot but nowhere near big enough to pay the sort of tribute that this writer believes Heelers deserved after more than 500 episodes.It is unlikely there will be anything like it again. At almost $500,000 an hour, shows such as Blue Heelers are quickly becoming the dinosaurs of Australian TV.'

1998 winner Logie Awards Most Popular Series
1997 winner Logie Awards Most Popular Series
form y separately published work icon A Country Practice ( dir. Igor Auzins et. al. )agent Sydney Australia : JNP Films Seven Network , 1981-1993 Z1699739 1981-1994 series - publisher film/TV

Set in a small, fictional, New South Wales country town called Wandin Valley, A Country Practice focused on the staffs of the town's medical practice and local hospital and on the families of the doctors, nurses, and patients. Many of the episodes also featured guest characters (frequently patients served by the practice) through whom various social and medical problems were explored. Although often considered a soap opera, the series was not built around an open-ended narrative; instead, the two one-hour episodes screened per week formed a self-contained narrative block, though many of the storylines were developed as sub-plots for several episodes before becoming the focus of a particular week's storyline. While the focus was on topical issues such as youth unemployment, suicide, drug addiction, HIV/AIDS, and terminal illness, the program did sometimes explore culturally sensitive issues, including, for example, the Aboriginal community and their place in modern Australian society.

Among the show's principal characters were Dr Terence Elliott, local policeman Sergeant Frank Gilroy, Esme Watson, Shirley Dean Gilroy, Bob Hatfield, Vernon 'Cookie' Locke, and Matron Margaret 'Maggie' Sloan. In addition to its regularly rotating cast of characters, A Country Practice also had a cast of semi-regulars who would make appearances as the storylines permitted. Interestingly, while the series initially targeted the adult and older youth demographic, it became increasingly popular with children over the years.

1992 nominated Logie Awards Most Popular Drama Series
1986 winner Logie Awards Most Popular Drama Series
1985 winner Logie Awards Most Popular Drama Series
1984 winner Logie Awards Most Popular Drama Series
Last amended 10 Oct 2006 16:55:58
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