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Tegan Schetrumpf Tegan Schetrumpf i(A140313 works by) (a.k.a. Tegan Jane Schetrumpf)
Gender: Female
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Works By

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1 'But with a General Groan' : Public and Private Voices in Jordie Albiston and Melinda Smith's Poetry Tegan Schetrumpf , 2018 single work criticism
— Appears in: Feeding the Ghost : 1 : Criticism on Contemporary Australian Poetry 2018; (p. 311-336)

'It is no easy task to construct a voice, or voices, that speak to contemporary Australian readers, given the micro-politics of the Australian millennial poetry scene. Since the inception of the Poetry Wars in 1968, many poetic subsets are encamped somewhere between the flags of more traditional lyrical poetry, and the avant-garde descendants of L=A=N=G=U=A=G=E poets. Keri Glastonbury describes these demarcations, bundled together to face the cultural, economic and digital pressures that seem always to be threatening poetry's existence, as "a UNESCO city of literature" (223). This analogy aptly conveys the range of voices, tones and registers that would be required to speak to Australian poetry audiences as a whole.'   (Introduction)

1 A Women's Place Is in the Workshop : On Community and Poetry Tegan Schetrumpf , 2016 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Poetry Journal , vol. 6 no. 1 2016; (p. 36-42)
'The idea of 'workshopping a poem' can be contentious among practicing poets. The trade and craft implications of the term can be a put-off, as though all unique imperfections of the poem will be sanded back on some production line. Donald Hall surely thought so; as early as the 1980s, the critic scathingly referred to the 'McPoems' made in creative writing workshops, and something of that greasy reputation has persisted ever since. While the biggest arguments against the collaborative writing and editing processes that take place within workshops are that they foster conventionality, timidity, and a loss of individuality, at least some of the concern is about the idea of property ownership - who owns a workshopped poem? What percentage did my colleagues' edit contribute? This process of writing unsettles older, Romantic notions about originality, inspiration and the 'lone artistic genius'. To be frank, it's not good for our creative egos.' (Introduction 37)
1 Terror Down Under? Tegan Schetrumpf , 2016 single work review
— Appears in: Philament , February no. 21 2016;

— Review of Woodsmoke Todd Turner , 2013 selected work poetry ; Drag Down to Unlock or Place an Emergency Call Melinda Smith , 2014 selected work poetry
1 “All You Need Is... ” : A Review of Tina Giannoukos’s Bull Days Tegan Schetrumpf , 2016 single work review essay
— Appears in: Philament , December no. 22 2016; (p. 141-149)
'The modern sonnet is a precarious poetic form. It is best recognised by its number of lines— twelve to fourteen—and its sense of being written “to” a person, animal, natural place, or even an abstract idea. It may or may not be conversational. It may or may not rhyme. It might be an argument, a dedication, or even an individual’s expression of intimacy. It either has its Petrachan-style volta pulled up around its midsection, or, more likely, offers a Shakespearean volta—its last couplet comprising a sting in its tail. Upon reading a modern sonnet, you might have to read it back over to check it is not merely a short poem, and then wonder how exactly you were able to tell the difference.' (Introduction)
1 Diminished but Never Dismissed : The Confessional Poetry of Sylvia Plath and Bruce Beaver Tegan Schetrumpf , 2015 single work criticism
— Appears in: Antipodes , June vol. 29 no. 1 2015; (p. 117-127)
'Using The Collected Poems (1981), Schetrumpf investigates Sylvia Plath's use of lyric address and her confrontation with patriarchal oppression, post-Holocaust existence, depression, and suicide. She also examines two of the recurring symbols that lead to the primal core of her poetry. She then compare Plath's content and methods with Bruce Beaver's experiments with various forms of lyric address, confrontation with mental illness, politicized war, and postmodern violence, and experiences of aging and death in Letters to Live Poets (1969). Finally, she examines two of the encoded symbols of the many that litter Beaver's landscapes of Manly.' (Publication abstract)
1 Canton Beach i "Sunrise. The musky scent of smoking fish", Tegan Schetrumpf , 2014 single work poetry
— Appears in: A Slow Combusting Hymn : Poetry from and About Newcastle and the Hunter Region in Newcastle 2014; (p. 262)
1 Budgewoi Bridge i "There has always been a bridge at Budgewoi.", Tegan Schetrumpf , 2014 single work poetry
— Appears in: A Slow Combusting Hymn : Poetry from and About Newcastle and the Hunter Region in Newcastle 2014; (p. 261)
1 A Big Blue Spectre, Top-Heavy i "We each have a pantheon of gods in our heads,", Tegan Schetrumpf , 2014 single work poetry
— Appears in: Australian Poetry Journal , vol. 4 no. 2 2014; (p. 132)
1 Do You Know? i "Each day that you swallow", Tegan Schetrumpf , 2014 single work poetry
— Appears in: Gangway : The On-Line Lit Mag , September no. 46 2014;
1 How Can You? i "With the pop, pop, of apoptosis in your ear", Tegan Schetrumpf , 2014 single work poetry
— Appears in: Gangway : The On-Line Lit Mag , September no. 46 2014;
1 The Value of Making : Traditional Form and Narrative in Australian Poetry since the Digital Revolution Tegan Schetrumpf , 2014 single work criticism
— Appears in: Axon : Creative Explorations , July vol. 4 no. 1 2014;
'In this essay I outline some broad structural and cultural aspects of the digital revolution which may contribute to the renewal of traditional form and narrative in Australian poetry as an expression of the millennial value of making. Firstly, that making traditional poetic forms is partly a response to the structural limitations of websites and e-readers, and culturally a response to the remediation of poetry to the perceived temporality and instability of the internet. I briefly associate Manovich’s argument that the database is the enemy of the narrative with the new ‘empirical turn’ in the humanities and suggest that strongly narrative poetry is reacting against the digital preference for the number. Finally I note the strategies of a smooth grammatical line and ‘bardic’ stance as a way for ‘professional’ authors to differentiate themselves from online amateurism.' (Publication abstract)
1 Flying Fish Cove i "You were so close.", Tegan Schetrumpf , 2013 single work poetry
— Appears in: SWAMP , October no. 13 2013;
1 The Darker Continent i "Step off the pier and into the unknown", Tegan Schetrumpf , 2013 single work poetry
— Appears in: Meanjin , Winter vol. 72 no. 2 2013; (p. 182)
1 At Kuranda i "When I was a girl, I won", Tegan Schetrumpf , 2012 single work poetry
— Appears in: Antipodes , December vol. 26 no. 2 2012; (p. 154)
1 A Beau for the Monster i "Nobody wants a sallow girl", Tegan Schetrumpf , 2012 single work poetry
— Appears in: Meanjin , Winter vol. 71 no. 2 2012; (p. 121-122)
1 The Cotton Mill i "Great spools of threaded white", Tegan Schetrumpf , 2012 single work poetry
— Appears in: Long Paddock , vol. 71 no. 3 2012;
1 The Mask of Tragedy Tegan Schetrumpf , 2007 single work short story
— Appears in: Phoenix : The University of Sydney Writers Journal 2007; (p. 58-65)
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