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Julia Clark Julia Clark i(A102425 works by)
Gender: Female
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Works By

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1 Julia Clark Reviews Dead Bolt by Ella Jeffery Julia Clark , 2020 single work review
— Appears in: Plumwood Mountain [Online] , November 2020;

— Review of Dead Bolt Ella Jeffery , 2020 selected work poetry
1 Julia Clark Reviews Acting Like a Girl by Sandra Renew Julia Clark , 2020 single work review
— Appears in: Plumwood Mountain [Online] , March 2020;

— Review of Acting Like a Girl Sandra Renew , 2019 selected work poetry
1 Julia Clark Reviews Alice Allan’s The Empty Show Julia Clark , 2020 single work review
— Appears in: Cordite Poetry Review , October no. 97 and 98 2020;

— Review of The Empty Show Alice Allan , 2019 selected work poetry
1 Poetry Against Neoliberal Capitalism in Ali Alizadeh and Melinda Bufton Julia Clark , 2020 single work criticism
— Appears in: Cordite Poetry Review , October no. 97 and 98 2020;

'Poetry has a long history of disruption, resistance, and revolution, overlapping the concerns of politics with literature and the boundaries of language. In globalised, late-stage capitalism, the place of language as a tool for propaganda, denial, and romanticisation is ever shifting to accommodate online engagement metrics and algorithms that alter and manipulate one’s lens onto the world. ‘Late’ as a qualifier for capitalism is used here to loosely encompass the end of the 20th and into the 21st century as a period over which the individualistic ideology of neoliberalism has grown and prospered. Rather than address inequity on a systemic or structural, neoliberal individualism instead charges the consumer with endless self-improvement tasks purported as a way to use systemic oppression to one’s advantage. For Australian poets Ali Alizadeh and Melinda Bufton, writing into and around capitalism means subverting the figure of the individual by positioning the lone poet against the systems of power that uphold inequity and oppression. Both Bufton and Alizadeh identify the hollowing out of language as a key component to capitalistic dominance whether through jargon as elitist gatekeeping or sexism in-built to corporate culture.' (Introduction)

1 A Mother's Love Julia Clark , 2014 single work poetry
— Appears in: Poetry D'Amour 2015 : Love Poems 2014; (p. 25)
1 Familiar Strangers, Strange Familiars Julia Clark , 2006 single work essay
— Appears in: The Sin Eaters : Post Colonial Convict Portraits from Van Diemen's Land 2006; (p. 3-7)
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