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Advertisement, The North Western Courier, 27 March 1916, p.3 (via Trove Australia)
form y separately published work icon How We Beat the Emden single work   film/TV  
Issue Details: First known date: 1915... 1915 How We Beat the Emden
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'It was a realistic picture, beginning with the training ship Tingara, on which Australian Jack Tars are made; there is a transfer of a draft from the training ship when war breaks out to the Sydney and Melbourne. One of the lads, coming home wounded from the Emden encounter, re-visiting the Tingara, tells the story of how the Emden was conquered, and the pictures which illustrate this yarn are true to the narrative, and undoubtedly afford a good idea of the fight. Pictures of the Emden after the fight which show how the pirate was smashed, were the last part.'

*Source:'

'Crown Pictures', South Coast Times and Wollongong Argus, 7 January 1916, p.12. (Via Trove Australia)

Exhibitions

7563031
7562457

Notes

  • Not to be confused with the slightly earlier documentary How We Fought the Emden, though this narrative film does incorporate some footage from that documentary.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Works about this Work

American Combine : Australasian Films Ltd., and Block Bookings Stephen Gaunson , 2015 single work criticism
— Appears in: Studies in Australasian Cinema , vol. 9 no. 3 2015; (p. 241-252)
'The 1927–1928 Commonwealth Royal Commission on the Moving Picture Industry in Australia followed a series of public inquiries into the Australian cinema. One agenda of the Commission was to examine the dominance of American movies in Australian film exhibition. By concentrating on how the Commission explored this issue, as it related to the exhibition and distribution of Hollywood movies in Australia, here I will consider the extent to which Australian exhibition has been guided by and dependent on American movies. With the Commission established, in part, to explore the accusation of an American combine ruling the exhibition industry, and stunting the local production sector, the real question was whether the Commissioners would be persuaded to make recommendations to wrest the powers from America, and consequently redirect the local exhibition industry's dependence on Hollywood movies.' (Publication abstract)
American Combine : Australasian Films Ltd., and Block Bookings Stephen Gaunson , 2015 single work criticism
— Appears in: Studies in Australasian Cinema , vol. 9 no. 3 2015; (p. 241-252)
'The 1927–1928 Commonwealth Royal Commission on the Moving Picture Industry in Australia followed a series of public inquiries into the Australian cinema. One agenda of the Commission was to examine the dominance of American movies in Australian film exhibition. By concentrating on how the Commission explored this issue, as it related to the exhibition and distribution of Hollywood movies in Australia, here I will consider the extent to which Australian exhibition has been guided by and dependent on American movies. With the Commission established, in part, to explore the accusation of an American combine ruling the exhibition industry, and stunting the local production sector, the real question was whether the Commissioners would be persuaded to make recommendations to wrest the powers from America, and consequently redirect the local exhibition industry's dependence on Hollywood movies.' (Publication abstract)
Last amended 9 Jul 2014 14:52:22
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  • Cocos (Keeling) Islands, Australian External Territories,
  • 1914
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