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Australian Fanzine
Subcategory of Ditmar Awards
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History

Awarded from the inception of the Ditmars, this award eventually became 'Best Fan Website/Zine' and then 'Best Fan Production'.

In 1978 alone, it was called 'Australian Amateur Production'.

In 1987, an anonymous 'zine called Motional was shortlisted for this award: it is not listed here, because its publication details have not been traced.

This award was not presented between 1999 and 2003.

Winners

2006 winner y separately published work icon TiconderogaOnline Ticon4 Lyn Triffitt (editor), Russell B. Farr (editor), Liz Grzyb (editor), 1999 Narrogin : Ticonderoga Publications , Z1249487 1999 periodical science fiction fantasy (12 issues)

Australia's longest-running semi-professional science-fiction webzine, TiconderogaOnline was established in 1999 by Russell B. Farr, the founder and editor of Ticonderoga Publications (TP). Farr had founded TP as a traditional publishing house, but saw the potential in online publishing, and subsequently closed down its operations to focus on the webzine. A shortage of time and available funds meant that TiconderogaOnline only published four short stories in its first year. In 2000, Farr published a further two stories before personal circumstances forced him to temporarily suspend the webzine.

In late 2003, a collective comprising Lee Battersby, Liz Grzyb, Lyn Triffitt, and Farr re-established TiconderogaOnline. The revamped website went public in 2004 with a new volume/issue edition format: volume 1, no. 1 was published in March. The website went on to win Best Website at the prestigious Ditmar Awards in 2006, in addition to having one of its authors nominated for Best Short Story. Late the following year, however, the webzine was again temporarily suspended, following a number of incidents, including moving the operations from Bentley to Greenwood, the ill-health of one of the editors, a month's delay in publishing issue #12, and the loss of the entire previous issue (#11) due to technical problems. The site was operating again by February 2008 with the publication of a double issue (to make up for the previous year's lapses). Later that same year, Farr and his editorial team decided to create a fourth incarnation of TiconderogaOnline, relaunching the site with a new name: Ticon4. Problems with maintaining Ticon4 have continued to plague the editors, however, with the site being trashed by a hacker in October 2009. This was followed shortly afterwards by the accidental deletion of the entire site by the webhost. Despite these setbacks, Ticon4 was again operating in early 2010.

2004 winner Edwina Harvey With Ted Scribner for the Australian Science Fiction Bullsheet.
2003 winner y separately published work icon Fables and Reflections Lily Chrywenstrom (editor), 2001 Claremont : Fables and Reflections , 2001- Z1118363 2001 periodical (8 issues) An Australian fanzine publishing fiction and non-fiction in the genres of science fiction, fantasy and magic realism, Fables and Reflections was established in Perth in May 2001, with its first issue being published in November that year. Covering an array of forms, including short fiction, poetry, critical essays, art, cartoons, interviews, reviews and articles focusing on Australian writing, the magazine was cconceved by its founding editor as a forum for specualtive fiction that was "a bit different." It was initially published as a fanzine, paying contributor copies only, but by issue 8 had become a more professional-looking publication.

Among the artists to contribute covers to Fables and Reflections were Cat Sparks, Daryl Lindquist and Judy Canavan.
1999 winner y separately published work icon The Metaphysical Review Bruce Gillespie (editor), Collingwood : Bruce Gillespie , 1984 Z1761298 1984 periodical (3 issues)

Bruce Gillespie started the science fiction and fantasy fanzine, The Metaphysical Review, in 1984 as a means of providing news and comment in the related areas of music, film, books, travel and chatter.

1997 winner y separately published work icon Eidolon : The Journal of Australian Science Fiction and Fantasy Jonathan Strahan (editor), Jeremy G. Byrne (editor), Robin Pen (editor), Richard Scriven (editor), Keira McKenzie (editor), Chris Stronach (editor), 1990 Perth : Eidolon Publications , 1990-2000 Z965832 1990 periodical (26 issues)

Taking its name from the tiny winged creature found on ancient Greek vases, Eidolon: The Journal of Australian Science Fiction and Fantasy was conceived by a group of individuals who came together for the first time during Swancon XV, the fifteenth annual Western Australian Science Fiction and Fantasy Convention. Published out of North Perth, Western Australia by Eidolon Publications, itself founded by Jonathan Strahan and Jeremy G. Byrne, a total of 26 issues were published between 1990 and 2000.

Issues 1-4 were edited by the Eidolon Editorial Committee comprising Byrne, Strahan, Robin Pen, Richard Scriven, Strahan, Keira McKenzie and Chris Stronach. Issues 5-24 were jointly edited by Scriven, Strahan and Byrne. Strahan and Byrne continued as editorial partners through issues 25/26-28, and Byrne was the sole editor of the final issue 25/26.

1997 winner y separately published work icon Thyme Andrew Brown (editor), Irwin Hirsh (editor), Roger Weddall (editor), Peter Burns (editor), South Yarra : Andrew Brown Irwin Hirsh , 1981-2003 7466701 1981 periodical science fiction

Melbourne-based science-fiction fanzine.

1996 winner y separately published work icon Eidolon : The Journal of Australian Science Fiction and Fantasy Jonathan Strahan (editor), Jeremy G. Byrne (editor), Robin Pen (editor), Richard Scriven (editor), Keira McKenzie (editor), Chris Stronach (editor), 1990 Perth : Eidolon Publications , 1990-2000 Z965832 1990 periodical (26 issues)

Taking its name from the tiny winged creature found on ancient Greek vases, Eidolon: The Journal of Australian Science Fiction and Fantasy was conceived by a group of individuals who came together for the first time during Swancon XV, the fifteenth annual Western Australian Science Fiction and Fantasy Convention. Published out of North Perth, Western Australia by Eidolon Publications, itself founded by Jonathan Strahan and Jeremy G. Byrne, a total of 26 issues were published between 1990 and 2000.

Issues 1-4 were edited by the Eidolon Editorial Committee comprising Byrne, Strahan, Robin Pen, Richard Scriven, Strahan, Keira McKenzie and Chris Stronach. Issues 5-24 were jointly edited by Scriven, Strahan and Byrne. Strahan and Byrne continued as editorial partners through issues 25/26-28, and Byrne was the sole editor of the final issue 25/26.

1995 winner y separately published work icon Thyme Andrew Brown (editor), Irwin Hirsh (editor), Roger Weddall (editor), Peter Burns (editor), South Yarra : Andrew Brown Irwin Hirsh , 1981-2003 7466701 1981 periodical science fiction

Melbourne-based science-fiction fanzine.

1994 winner y separately published work icon Ethel the Aardvark Melbourne : Melbourne Science Fiction Club , 1985- 7488763 1985 periodical science fiction

Fanzine run by the Melbourne Science Fiction Club.

1993 winner y separately published work icon Eidolon : The Journal of Australian Science Fiction and Fantasy Jonathan Strahan (editor), Jeremy G. Byrne (editor), Robin Pen (editor), Richard Scriven (editor), Keira McKenzie (editor), Chris Stronach (editor), 1990 Perth : Eidolon Publications , 1990-2000 Z965832 1990 periodical (26 issues)

Taking its name from the tiny winged creature found on ancient Greek vases, Eidolon: The Journal of Australian Science Fiction and Fantasy was conceived by a group of individuals who came together for the first time during Swancon XV, the fifteenth annual Western Australian Science Fiction and Fantasy Convention. Published out of North Perth, Western Australia by Eidolon Publications, itself founded by Jonathan Strahan and Jeremy G. Byrne, a total of 26 issues were published between 1990 and 2000.

Issues 1-4 were edited by the Eidolon Editorial Committee comprising Byrne, Strahan, Robin Pen, Richard Scriven, Strahan, Keira McKenzie and Chris Stronach. Issues 5-24 were jointly edited by Scriven, Strahan and Byrne. Strahan and Byrne continued as editorial partners through issues 25/26-28, and Byrne was the sole editor of the final issue 25/26.

1992 winner y separately published work icon Eidolon : The Journal of Australian Science Fiction and Fantasy Jonathan Strahan (editor), Jeremy G. Byrne (editor), Robin Pen (editor), Richard Scriven (editor), Keira McKenzie (editor), Chris Stronach (editor), 1990 Perth : Eidolon Publications , 1990-2000 Z965832 1990 periodical (26 issues)

Taking its name from the tiny winged creature found on ancient Greek vases, Eidolon: The Journal of Australian Science Fiction and Fantasy was conceived by a group of individuals who came together for the first time during Swancon XV, the fifteenth annual Western Australian Science Fiction and Fantasy Convention. Published out of North Perth, Western Australia by Eidolon Publications, itself founded by Jonathan Strahan and Jeremy G. Byrne, a total of 26 issues were published between 1990 and 2000.

Issues 1-4 were edited by the Eidolon Editorial Committee comprising Byrne, Strahan, Robin Pen, Richard Scriven, Strahan, Keira McKenzie and Chris Stronach. Issues 5-24 were jointly edited by Scriven, Strahan and Byrne. Strahan and Byrne continued as editorial partners through issues 25/26-28, and Byrne was the sole editor of the final issue 25/26.

1991 winner y separately published work icon Australian Science Fiction Review. Second Series Australian SF Review. Second Series Janeen Webb (editor), Lucy Sussex (editor), Yvonne Rousseau (editor), Russell Blackford (editor), Jenny Blackford (editor), John Foyster (editor), 1986 Melbourne : Ebony Books , 1986-1991 Z1810204 1986 periodical The second series of Australian Science Fiction Review began in 1986 following a period of hibernation that began in 1974. The first series, published between 1966 and 1969, was formerly known as the Australian Science Fiction Newsletter (1958-1966). In December 1969 the zine's editor John Bangsund relaunched it as Scythrop (1969-1973/74). In all 27 issues of series two were published by Ebony Books for the Science Fiction Collective in six volumes before its final issue in March/May 1991.

Contributors included: John Bangsund, John Baxter, John D. Berry, Martin Bridgstock, Damien Broderick, Bruce Gillespie, Mark Linneman, Rosaleen Love, Joanna Russ, Norman Talbot, Michael J. Tolley, George Turner, Cherry Wilder, and Jack Williamson.

Australian Science Fiction Review won the Ditmar Award for Best Fanzine in 1991.
1990 winner y separately published work icon Ethel the Aardvark Melbourne : Melbourne Science Fiction Club , 1985- 7488763 1985 periodical science fiction

Fanzine run by the Melbourne Science Fiction Club.

1989 winner y separately published work icon Get Stuffed Jacob Blake (editor), Brunswick West : Ditmar Deserving Publications , 1988- 7488335 1988 periodical science fiction fantasy

Science-fiction fanzine published out of Melbourne.

1988 winner y separately published work icon Science Fiction : A Review of Speculative Literature Van Ikin (editor), Terry Dowling (editor), 1977 Sydney : 1977-1980 Z953236 1977 periodical (48 issues)

In 1976 the only magazine devoted to science fiction in Australia was SF Commentary, but little space was given to sustained literary analysis. Aiming to demonstrate that science fiction could stand as literature, Van Ikin, then a young academic at Sydney University, established Science Fiction: A Review of Speculative Literature in 1977.

Co-edited with Terry Dowling, Science Fiction eventually replaced SF Commentary as the prominent Australian journal of science fiction, hosting the latter's final issue in 1983. When Ikin moved to Western Australia to pursue his academic career, the editorial duties moved with him and Dowling's influence subsided. However, he and a board of editors continue to play an advisory role in the production of the magazine.

Contributors to Science Fiction have been primarily, but not exclusively, academics. Early issues included discussion on Australian authors such as Damien Broderick, Peter Carey, Lee Harding, Frank Bryning, George Turner and film-maker Peter Weir. Interviews and analyses of the work of international authors such as Roger Zelazny, Stanislaw Len and Frank Herbert were also included. Subsequent issues have maintained the early aims of Science Fiction, but exploration of new areas such as gender have been encouraged in recent years.

Although the frequency of Science Fiction has decreased to its annual appearances since 1999, it remains one of the most significant contributors to current debates on Australian science fiction.

1987 winner y separately published work icon Thyme Andrew Brown (editor), Irwin Hirsh (editor), Roger Weddall (editor), Peter Burns (editor), South Yarra : Andrew Brown Irwin Hirsh , 1981-2003 7466701 1981 periodical science fiction

Melbourne-based science-fiction fanzine.

1986 winner y separately published work icon The Metaphysical Review Bruce Gillespie (editor), Collingwood : Bruce Gillespie , 1984 Z1761298 1984 periodical (3 issues)

Bruce Gillespie started the science fiction and fantasy fanzine, The Metaphysical Review, in 1984 as a means of providing news and comment in the related areas of music, film, books, travel and chatter.

1985 winner y separately published work icon Australian SF News Australian Science Fiction &​ Fantasy News Mervyn Binns (editor), Melbourne : Australian SF News , 1978-1990 7463406 1978 periodical science fiction fantasy

Science-fiction and fantasy fanzine.

1984 joint winner y separately published work icon Ornithopter Leigh Edmonds (editor), Canberra : Leigh Edmonds , 1980-1989 7467140 1980 periodical

Science-fiction fanzine.

Won with Edmonds' other 'zine, Rataplan.
1984 joint winner y separately published work icon Rataplan Leigh Edmonds (editor), Diane Bangsund (editor), Victoria : U-Boat Publishers , 1969-1984 7460327 1969 periodical science fiction

A science-fiction zine, Rataplan included editorials, fiction, fanzine and book reviews, convention reports, and letters.

It published works by, among others, Justin Ackroyd, Christine Ashby, Diane Bangsund, John Bangsund, Rory Barnes, Bernie Bernhouse, Damien Broderick, Ed Cagle, Elton Elliot, Leanne Frahm, Bob Gerrand, Bruce Gillespie, Ron Graham, Lee Harding, Jack Herman, Lesleigh Luttrell, Marc Ortlieb, Russell Parker, R.D. Symons, and George Turner.

Won with Edmonds' other 'zine, Ornithopter.
1983 winner y separately published work icon Q36 Marc Ortlieb (editor), Marden : Peppermint Frog Press , 1979-1983 7463357 1979 periodical science fiction

Australian genzine.

1982 winner y separately published work icon Q36 Marc Ortlieb (editor), Marden : Peppermint Frog Press , 1979-1983 7463357 1979 periodical science fiction

Australian genzine.

1981 winner y separately published work icon Q36 Marc Ortlieb (editor), Marden : Peppermint Frog Press , 1979-1983 7463357 1979 periodical science fiction

Australian genzine.

1980 winner y separately published work icon SF Commentary : The Independent Magazine About Science Fiction Bruce Gillespie (editor), 1969 Bacchus Marsh : Bruce Gillespie , Z965181 1969 periodical (15 issues) 'SF Commentary sits at the high end of the 'sercon,' or serious discussion of SF, group of fanzines, a position it has occupied for many years now. In this SFC is following a proud Australian tradition first established by John Bangsund in the mid-60s with his Australian SF Review. Both fanzines engaged SF's literati from throughout the world, and both have offered important venues to some of the major voices in SF criticism, who in turn have written seminal pieces on some of the most important authors to emerge in the field in the second half of the 20th century, starting with Phil Dick and Ursula LeGuin.

What's most impressive about the way Gillespie (now) and Bangsund (then) have accomplished this is that neither gave in to the academic stuffed-shirt navel-gazing which has grown up over the past forty years around SF and all but smothered SF criticism. SFC maintains a civilized and literate tone throughout, but draws more upon the British tradition of letters and the ties of fannish community to accomplish its purposes. It is not by accident that Gillespie has long called his editorial in SFC "I Must Be Talking To My Friends."'

[Ted White. 'Fanzines.' WSFA Journal April 2002 (sighted 8/01/2013]
1979 winner y separately published work icon Chunder! John Foyster (editor), 1978 Melbourne : John Foyster , Z1923161 1978 periodical (1 issues) The winner of the 1979 Ditmar for Best Fanzine, Chunder! was edited and published by John Foyster from around 1978.
1978 winner y separately published work icon Enigma Van Ikin (editor), 1970 Sydney : Sydney University Science Fiction Association , Z1096327 1970 periodical

Quarterly fanzine published by the Sydney University SF Association, in which a number of science fiction writers published their first stories, including Terry Dowling and Rick Kennett.

Given this year only to 'Australian Amateur Production'.
1977 winner y separately published work icon SF Commentary : The Independent Magazine About Science Fiction Bruce Gillespie (editor), 1969 Bacchus Marsh : Bruce Gillespie , Z965181 1969 periodical (15 issues) 'SF Commentary sits at the high end of the 'sercon,' or serious discussion of SF, group of fanzines, a position it has occupied for many years now. In this SFC is following a proud Australian tradition first established by John Bangsund in the mid-60s with his Australian SF Review. Both fanzines engaged SF's literati from throughout the world, and both have offered important venues to some of the major voices in SF criticism, who in turn have written seminal pieces on some of the most important authors to emerge in the field in the second half of the 20th century, starting with Phil Dick and Ursula LeGuin.

What's most impressive about the way Gillespie (now) and Bangsund (then) have accomplished this is that neither gave in to the academic stuffed-shirt navel-gazing which has grown up over the past forty years around SF and all but smothered SF criticism. SFC maintains a civilized and literate tone throughout, but draws more upon the British tradition of letters and the ties of fannish community to accomplish its purposes. It is not by accident that Gillespie has long called his editorial in SFC "I Must Be Talking To My Friends."'

[Ted White. 'Fanzines.' WSFA Journal April 2002 (sighted 8/01/2013]
1976 winner y separately published work icon Fanew Sletter Leigh Edmonds (editor), Balaclava : Leigh Edmonds , 1974 7462053 1974 periodical

Science-fiction fanzine / newsletter.

1973 winner y separately published work icon SF Commentary : The Independent Magazine About Science Fiction Bruce Gillespie (editor), 1969 Bacchus Marsh : Bruce Gillespie , Z965181 1969 periodical (15 issues) 'SF Commentary sits at the high end of the 'sercon,' or serious discussion of SF, group of fanzines, a position it has occupied for many years now. In this SFC is following a proud Australian tradition first established by John Bangsund in the mid-60s with his Australian SF Review. Both fanzines engaged SF's literati from throughout the world, and both have offered important venues to some of the major voices in SF criticism, who in turn have written seminal pieces on some of the most important authors to emerge in the field in the second half of the 20th century, starting with Phil Dick and Ursula LeGuin.

What's most impressive about the way Gillespie (now) and Bangsund (then) have accomplished this is that neither gave in to the academic stuffed-shirt navel-gazing which has grown up over the past forty years around SF and all but smothered SF criticism. SFC maintains a civilized and literate tone throughout, but draws more upon the British tradition of letters and the ties of fannish community to accomplish its purposes. It is not by accident that Gillespie has long called his editorial in SFC "I Must Be Talking To My Friends."'

[Ted White. 'Fanzines.' WSFA Journal April 2002 (sighted 8/01/2013]
1972 winner y separately published work icon SF Commentary : The Independent Magazine About Science Fiction Bruce Gillespie (editor), 1969 Bacchus Marsh : Bruce Gillespie , Z965181 1969 periodical (15 issues) 'SF Commentary sits at the high end of the 'sercon,' or serious discussion of SF, group of fanzines, a position it has occupied for many years now. In this SFC is following a proud Australian tradition first established by John Bangsund in the mid-60s with his Australian SF Review. Both fanzines engaged SF's literati from throughout the world, and both have offered important venues to some of the major voices in SF criticism, who in turn have written seminal pieces on some of the most important authors to emerge in the field in the second half of the 20th century, starting with Phil Dick and Ursula LeGuin.

What's most impressive about the way Gillespie (now) and Bangsund (then) have accomplished this is that neither gave in to the academic stuffed-shirt navel-gazing which has grown up over the past forty years around SF and all but smothered SF criticism. SFC maintains a civilized and literate tone throughout, but draws more upon the British tradition of letters and the ties of fannish community to accomplish its purposes. It is not by accident that Gillespie has long called his editorial in SFC "I Must Be Talking To My Friends."'

[Ted White. 'Fanzines.' WSFA Journal April 2002 (sighted 8/01/2013]
1971 winner y separately published work icon The Somerset Gazette Noel Kerr (editor), Melbourne : Melbourne Science Fiction Club Melbourne Fantasy Film Group , 1970-1971 7460616 1970 periodical science fiction

Science-fiction fanzine.

1970 winner y separately published work icon The Journal of Omphalistic Epistemology John Foyster (editor), Mulgrave : John Foyster , 1969-1973 7460436 1969 periodical science fiction

Science-fiction fanzine, which succeeded John Foyster's fanzine Exploding Madonna.

1969 winner y separately published work icon Australian Science Fiction Review Australian SF Review John Bangsund (editor), Melbourne : John Bangsund , 1966-1969 Z813110 1966-1969 periodical (4 issues) An Australian science fiction fanzine edited and published by John Bangsund the Australian Science Fiction Review started out as the Australian Science Fiction Newsletter. Twenty issues were published between 1966 and the end of 1969, at which time Bangsund relaunched it as Scythrop. Production of that zine ended in the summer of 1974, leading to a period of hibernation which lasted until Bangsund started a second series of the Australian Science Fiction Review in 1986.

Among the contributors to the first series of Australian Science Fiction Review were: Brian Aldiss, John Baxter, James Blish, A. Bertram Chandler, George Turner, Jim Ellis (as 'Jay Wallis'), John Foyster, Bruce Gillespie, Lee Harding, Langdon Jones, Ursula Le Guin, Michael Moorcock, Sam Moskowitz, Bernard O'Dowd, Thomas Love Peacock, Franz Rottensteiner, Bob Sessions (as 'Scribarius'), and Bob Toomey.

The Australian Science Fiction Review won the inaugural Ditmar Award for Best Fanzine (1969).
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