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Salvation single work   drama  
Issue Details: First known date: 2013... 2013 Salvation
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'Salvation is a realisation of Hassall’s creative research into themes associated with white inheritance of Australian landscape. The work transforms theoretical investigation of landscape from post-colonial and spatial positions into theatrical exploration and questions Euro-centric associations of historical and future place, asking ‘What will we leave behind?’ Salvation voices some uncomfortable national silences to investigate and provoke socio-cultural questions pertaining to identity, nation, race, class and gender. Salvation questions the ideological or mythological perceptions that may promote a sense of the significance of dominant (white) European society in the Australian landscape. Salvation may read as a metaphor that voices Australian racial, environmental and cultural tensions. Salvation claims the value of landscape as central to the themes investigated and to the cultural knowledge statements that are embedded within the fiction. ' (Author's abstract)

Production Details

  • Salvation had a season at The Brisbane Powerhouse in August/September 2012.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Works about this Work

Contemporary Theatrical Landscapes : The Legacy of Romanticism in Two Examples of Contemporary Australian Gothic Drama Linda Hassall , 2017 single work criticism
— Appears in: TEXT Special Issue Website Series , October no. 41 2017;

'At this time in history, climate change predicts that we are once again dwarfed by nature. Nature is as Massey (2008) suggests, understood as the classic foundations for our contemplation of place and our fascinations with belonging to place. As creative writers, artists and scholars respond to escalating temperatures, rising sea levels and natural disasters, on a daily basis, the threat of climate change events loom large in the contemporary imagination. Humankind’s pride in domination over all things natural is being put to the test, as we begin to anticipate the terrifying spectacle of our own damnation. From an ecological and eco-critical perspective, climate change may be considered, as the contemporary ‘abomination’ as it poses both a moral and a psychological paradox for us all. It is not an hallucinatory fantasy, nor is it a social pathology. Contemporary Australian Gothic drama explores the paradoxical relationship between perceptions of what is absent and what is present, between past and future, between climate, nature and disappearing landscapes and geographies. It is within this paradox of perception that Australian Gothic drama responds to literary legacies of Romanticism as we ‘lament the loss of spiritual connections’ to nature (Bate 1991: 17). This paper discusses the environmental and eco-critical themes embedded in two of my theatrical works, Dust 2016 and Salvation 2013, in which notions of evil in the Romantic sense are discovered in the ecologies of landscape, place and space from which we as humans are, in turn, becoming alienated.' (Publication abstract)

Contemporary Theatrical Landscapes : The Legacy of Romanticism in Two Examples of Contemporary Australian Gothic Drama Linda Hassall , 2017 single work criticism
— Appears in: TEXT Special Issue Website Series , October no. 41 2017;

'At this time in history, climate change predicts that we are once again dwarfed by nature. Nature is as Massey (2008) suggests, understood as the classic foundations for our contemplation of place and our fascinations with belonging to place. As creative writers, artists and scholars respond to escalating temperatures, rising sea levels and natural disasters, on a daily basis, the threat of climate change events loom large in the contemporary imagination. Humankind’s pride in domination over all things natural is being put to the test, as we begin to anticipate the terrifying spectacle of our own damnation. From an ecological and eco-critical perspective, climate change may be considered, as the contemporary ‘abomination’ as it poses both a moral and a psychological paradox for us all. It is not an hallucinatory fantasy, nor is it a social pathology. Contemporary Australian Gothic drama explores the paradoxical relationship between perceptions of what is absent and what is present, between past and future, between climate, nature and disappearing landscapes and geographies. It is within this paradox of perception that Australian Gothic drama responds to literary legacies of Romanticism as we ‘lament the loss of spiritual connections’ to nature (Bate 1991: 17). This paper discusses the environmental and eco-critical themes embedded in two of my theatrical works, Dust 2016 and Salvation 2013, in which notions of evil in the Romantic sense are discovered in the ecologies of landscape, place and space from which we as humans are, in turn, becoming alienated.' (Publication abstract)

Last amended 11 Jan 2021 15:26:28
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