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y separately published work icon N single work   novel   fantasy  
Issue Details: First known date: 2014... 2014 N
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'The accidental death of MP Norman Cole precipitates a hung parliament allowing a core of extreme right-wing politicians to seize power. Telford, a high ranking but unworldly public servant is approached by Cole's wife who believes her husband was murdered and asks him to investigate on her behalf. The reward for this, he hopes, will be her love. Despite the bizarre and threatening nature of his investigations, he remains convinced that the "scribbled note" about the meeting with "N" holds the key to what he seeks.' (Publisher's blurb)

Notes

  • Dedication:

    To Doug Muecke

    and to the memory of

    Ben Frater (1979-2007), Australian poet

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • Blackheath, Blue Mountains, Sydney, New South Wales,: Brandl and Schlesinger , 2014 .
      image of person or book cover 768230259298544962.jpg
      Image courtesy of publisher's website
      Extent: 599p.
      Note/s:
      • Release date: March 2014
      ISBN: 9781921556203 (paperback) :

Works about this Work

Rereadings III: John A. Scott: N Martin Duwell , 2019 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Poetry Review , no. 14 2019;

'John A. Scott’s N belongs, at least on a superficial reading, to the genre of alternative histories. The death of an independent, Norman Cole, in 1942 leads to the replacement of the Curtin government by one lead by Warren Mahony. The Japanese invade, the American forces, only newly arrived, depart and the Australian government retreats southward, making Melbourne the centre of “free” Australia and forming a new base for government at Mt Macedon. But readers expecting a conventional, realistic exploration of this new “reality-possibility”, will quickly register surprise since N is also a compendium of different styles and, more importantly, a compendium of imaginative, non-realistic scenarios.' (Introduction)

Review : N Aasish Kaul , 2014 single work review
— Appears in: Long Paddock , vol. 74 no. 3 2014;

— Review of N John Scott , 2014 single work novel
Australia at War, But Not in Any Way We Know It Peter Craven , 2014 single work review
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 12-13 July 2014; (p. 35) The Age , 12 July 2014; (p. 35) The Canberra Times , 12 July 2014; (p. 25)

— Review of N John Scott , 2014 single work novel
OTT Don Anderson , 2014 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , June-July no. 362 2014; (p. 25)

— Review of N John Scott , 2014 single work novel
Artists Against Fascism Susan Lever , 2014 single work review
— Appears in: Sydney Review of Books , June 2014;

— Review of N John Scott , 2014 single work novel
Artists Against Fascism Susan Lever , 2014 single work review
— Appears in: Sydney Review of Books , June 2014;

— Review of N John Scott , 2014 single work novel
OTT Don Anderson , 2014 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , June-July no. 362 2014; (p. 25)

— Review of N John Scott , 2014 single work novel
Australia at War, But Not in Any Way We Know It Peter Craven , 2014 single work review
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 12-13 July 2014; (p. 35) The Age , 12 July 2014; (p. 35) The Canberra Times , 12 July 2014; (p. 25)

— Review of N John Scott , 2014 single work novel
Review : N Aasish Kaul , 2014 single work review
— Appears in: Long Paddock , vol. 74 no. 3 2014;

— Review of N John Scott , 2014 single work novel
Rereadings III: John A. Scott: N Martin Duwell , 2019 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Poetry Review , no. 14 2019;

'John A. Scott’s N belongs, at least on a superficial reading, to the genre of alternative histories. The death of an independent, Norman Cole, in 1942 leads to the replacement of the Curtin government by one lead by Warren Mahony. The Japanese invade, the American forces, only newly arrived, depart and the Australian government retreats southward, making Melbourne the centre of “free” Australia and forming a new base for government at Mt Macedon. But readers expecting a conventional, realistic exploration of this new “reality-possibility”, will quickly register surprise since N is also a compendium of different styles and, more importantly, a compendium of imaginative, non-realistic scenarios.' (Introduction)

Last amended 15 Jul 2015 16:08:10
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